Special Issue "Physical Education, Health Promotion, and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Pedro Antonio Sánchez-Miguel
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Teacher Training College, University of Extremadura, Avd. de la Universidad S/N, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: promoting physical activity; body image; interventions program; physical education
Mr. Miguel Ángel Tapia Serrano
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Teacher Training College, University of Extremadura, Avd. de la Universidad S/N, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: promoting physical activity; body image; interventions program; physical education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main aim of the current Special Issue is to show the different cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intervention programs that are developed in the context of physical education, and physical activity and sports in children, adolescents, and adults. In this regard, the purpose is to show relevant associations between promoting physical activity in physical education domain and physiological, psychological, cognitive, and affective consequences. Moreover, this Special Issue aims to show different intervention programs in the promotion of physical activity in different contexts (extracurricular context, physical education context, etc.) and ages. New methodological researches and instruments are welcome.

The Special Issue will be situated in the existing literature emphasizing new studies and results with different instrument and designs. In this regard, it is important to note the importance and novelty of the treatment of physical activity and different consequences, such as cognitive achievement, body image, bully behavior, etc., which deal with some interesting topics that are being studied at the moment. Moreover, the study of the environment in physical education context, in order to promote physical activity in and out of schools is of interest for researchers and readers. Finally, sustainability in physical activity for adults is continuously studied, which gives this Special Issue a wide range of interest for investigators from all over the world.

Dr. Pedro Antonio Sánchez-Miguel
Mr. Miguel Ángel Tapia Serrano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical education
  • Physical activity
  • Intervention program
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Adults
  • Fitness
  • Sustainability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Children’s Physical Self-Concept and Body Image According to Weight Status and Physical Fitness
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 782; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030782 - 21 Jan 2020
Abstract
Previous researchers have found that low body satisfaction may be a barrier to engaging in physical activity. Therefore, this research examines the association between self-concept, body dissatisfaction, fitness, and weight status in adolescents. The sample was formed by 303 students from primary schools, [...] Read more.
Previous researchers have found that low body satisfaction may be a barrier to engaging in physical activity. Therefore, this research examines the association between self-concept, body dissatisfaction, fitness, and weight status in adolescents. The sample was formed by 303 students from primary schools, (males (n = 150) and female (n = 153)) aged 10 to 13 years (M = 11.74; SD = 0.86). Initially, participants’ BMIs, as well as waist-to-hip ratio were assessed. Later, all individuals answered a questionnaire about their perception of self-concept and body image perception. Moreover, agility run test and 6-min walking test were developed to assess children’s physical fitness. Results showed self-concept differences according to different fitness level. Moreover, some factors from self-concept emerged as relevant to explain body dissatisfaction. Finally, outcomes suggest the importance of physical fitness and the perception of competence and self-esteem in adolescent boys and girls, so these two issues might be promoted in primary school classes to improve body satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Health Promotion, and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Physical Activity and Commuting to School in Spanish Nine-Year-Old Children: Differences by Gender and by Geographical Environment
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7104; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247104 - 11 Dec 2019
Abstract
Children’s health status is related to their physical activity levels. Active commuting is associated with higher physical activity and reduced risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease incidence, and diabetes. The objective of this research was to study the levels of physical activity and [...] Read more.
Children’s health status is related to their physical activity levels. Active commuting is associated with higher physical activity and reduced risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease incidence, and diabetes. The objective of this research was to study the levels of physical activity and the commuting to school (active vs. passive) in Spanish nine-year-old children, analyzing the differences by gender and by the geographical environment where they live (rural or urban environment). Accelerometry was used for the measurement of physical activity: Sedentary time (min/day), vigorous physical activity (min/day), moderate to vigorous physical activity (min/day), intensity (counts/min), steps (number). The questionnaire of the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) was used to determine the geographical environment (city/urban, residential area/outside city, rural/village) and the modes of transport (active: Walking and bicycle, passive: Car, motorcycle, public transport). A total of 455 Spanish nine-year-old children (247 girls and 208 boys) belonging to the EYHS participated in this study. The results showed that boys were significantly more physically active than girls (p ≤ 0.001). Results also showed that active commuting to school was positively correlated with the levels of physical activity (r = 0.324, p ≤ 0.001). The geographical environment influenced the way in which children went to school, being active commuting to school significantly (p ≤ 0.001) less frequent in those children who lived in a rural environment (22.4%) than in those who lived in the city (57.1%) or in a residential area (62.7%). As active commuting to school means increasing levels of physical activity in both sexes, strategies should be implemented in order to encourage active commuting to schools, contributing at the same time to better health and sustainability of future generations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Health Promotion, and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Cooperative Learning and Students’ Motivation, Social Interactions and Attitudes: Perspectives from Two Different Educational Stages
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7005; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247005 - 08 Dec 2019
Abstract
The goal of the study was to contrast the effects that a Cooperative Learning implementation in Physical Education can produce in two different Educational stages: Primary and Secondary Education. A total of 179 students agreed to participate: 96 (44 boys, 52 girls) were [...] Read more.
The goal of the study was to contrast the effects that a Cooperative Learning implementation in Physical Education can produce in two different Educational stages: Primary and Secondary Education. A total of 179 students agreed to participate: 96 (44 boys, 52 girls) were enrolled in four Year 7 Primary Education groups (11.37 ± 0.89 years) and 83 students (38 boys, 45 girls) were enrolled in three Year 11 Secondary Education groups (15.42 ± 1.12 years). Convenience sampling was used. All groups experienced three consecutive learning units (23 sessions). At post-test, motivation increased significantly in the two groups (p = 0.031, p = 0.029), while social interaction only in the Secondary Education group (p = 0.024), and a significant difference between groups was also obtained in the post-test (p = 0.034). All effect sizes exceed the value of 0.87, which is considered large. Qualitative data showed that the teacher highlighted the importance of cooperation in Physical Education in order to promote respect for others and joint thinking in Primary Education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Health Promotion, and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Physical Activity and Health Habits of 17- to 25-Year-Old Young People during Their Free Time
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6577; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236577 - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
The objective was to examine daily health-related habits and physical activity during free time in a group of young people, with the aim of analysing what types of habits are developed and the associations existing between these habits. A cross-sectional and observational study [...] Read more.
The objective was to examine daily health-related habits and physical activity during free time in a group of young people, with the aim of analysing what types of habits are developed and the associations existing between these habits. A cross-sectional and observational study was carried out. The sample was composed of 1132 young people from Castilla-La Mancha (Spain), 53.4% women and 46.6% men, between 17 and 25 years old (M = 20.63; DT = 2.01). The instrument used in this study was the questionnaire of assessment of health-related habits (QAHH). Different ranges of age and gender were taken into account in the analyses. The results showed low rates of physical activity, with only 25% of the participants practicing physical activity in their free time. Regarding gender, no differences were observed between boys and girls in terms of the level of physical activity practice. The inferential analyses revealed several significant relationships between the habits of leisure time and the practice of physical activity. The analyses also revealed that alcohol consumption, tobacco consumption and Internet were used as means to escape from everyday life. The most frequent free-time activities of the participants during the week were the use of new technologies and the consumption of harmful substances. During the weekends the most frequent ones were physical activity and consumption of harmful substances. While the relationship between physical activity, health-related habits and leisure time in young people is complex, these results indicate that physical activity should be promoted in young people, especially during the week and as a healthy alternative to the consumption of harmful substances. To do this, professionals of different fields (education, psychology, sports sciences, nutrition and medicine, among others) should work together. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Health Promotion, and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Sport: Cardio-Differentiated Planning of Fitness Programs for High School Boys Engaged in Speed Skiing
Sustainability 2019, 11(21), 6077; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11216077 - 01 Nov 2019
Abstract
In speed skiing, an athlete’s functional readiness is tested by means of a bicycle ergometer (EGM). The purpose of this research is to make various mesocycle plans for high school boys, engaged in speed skiing, with due account for their cardio-functional indicators obtained [...] Read more.
In speed skiing, an athlete’s functional readiness is tested by means of a bicycle ergometer (EGM). The purpose of this research is to make various mesocycle plans for high school boys, engaged in speed skiing, with due account for their cardio-functional indicators obtained by means of the EGM. The study was attended by the 16–17 years old, first-category and sub-master racing skiers, included in the junior regional teams of the Russian Federation (Republic of Tatarstan and Udmurtia). The total number of subjects included eight men. In training young racing skiers, a differentiated approach combined with leg muscle testing will allow an improvement in sports results more effectively at different stages, as well as monitoring the young athlete’s response to the cardiovascular load. Low cardiac capacity indices have a negative impact on the racing skier’s performance. EGM testing allows determining the maximum cardiac capacity by measuring the amount of oxygen delivered to the working muscles at the HR of 190 beats per minute. Therefore, case-specific aerobic load was planned for each mesocycle according to these data. Based on the cardiac capacity growth, such means of physical training as interval, high-speed, and tempo training were planned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Education, Health Promotion, and Sustainability)
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