Special Issue "Integrating Agricultural and Tourism Supply Chains for Fostering Sustainable Development in Inner Areas"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Geography and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Stefano Duglio
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Guest Editor
Department of Management, University of Torino, 10134 Turin, Italy
Interests: sustainable tourism; mountain tourism; sport tourism; environmental management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giampiero Lombardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences, University of Torino, Torino 10124, Italy
Interests: sustainable agriculture; mountain agriculture; mountain farming; environmental management
Dr. Hans Olav Bråtå
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Eastern Norway Research Institute, School of Business and Social Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer 2318, Norway
Interests: beer and food in mountain communities; cultural heritage in mountain regions; sustainable tourism in mountain regions; national parks; spatial development planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Presently, tourism undoubtedly represents a key driver for the development of many inner areas; consider, for example, that mountains account for 15%–20% of worldwide tourism [1] and only the Alps are able to attract around 120 million tourists each year [2].

Compared to the tourism industry, agriculture often plays a marginal economic role but, since mountain landscapes have been shaped by agricultural activities for centuries [3], it still has a primary role in their conservation.

However, when considering inner areas, especially mountainous ones, it is worth noting that economic activities are strongly characterized by fragmentation, small business size, and lack of communication among tourism and food chain actors, local administrators, and other stakeholders [4]. This situation may affect the competitiveness of both agricultural and tourism holdings, the former being unable to promote their high-quality products and find an appropriate placement on markets, and the latter unable to propose an offer tightly tied to territories.

The need of integrating the agriculture and tourism chains results from these considerations and has to be pondered as a tool for boosting the local economies. In fact, even if the interconnections between the two sectors are clear—farms produce many local foods used by tourism holdings, and agritourism is a well-known tourist accommodation facility linked to agriculture [5]—not much has been explored to date in order to integrate the two chains in a common development vision.

This Special Issue proposal aims at discussing the real feasibility of integrating agriculture and tourism as a strategy for boosting the economic development of inner mountain areas; is the integration of agriculture and tourism supply chains possible? Will such an integration trigger innovation processes and result in productions supporting the local community development? The contributions in this Special Issue will answer these questions by providing theoretical and methodological approaches as well as research results, applications, and experiences on the integration between agriculture and tourism, with a special focus on mountainous areas.

Papers selected for this Special Issue are subjected to a peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Prof. Stefano Duglio
Prof. Giampiero Lombardi
Dr. Hans Olav Bråtå
Guest Editors

References

  1. Debarbieux, B.; Oiry Varacca, M.; Rudaz, G.; Maselli, D.; Kohler, T.; Jurek, M. (Eds.). Tourism in Mountain Regions: Hopes, Fears and Realities. Sustainable Mountain Development Series. UNIGE, CDE, SDC: Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.
  2. World Wide Fund for Nature – WWF (2019). The European Alps. Available online: http://wwf.panda.org/knowledge_hub/where_we_work/alps/ (accessed on 15 November 2019)
  3. Bätzing, W. Le Alpi. Una regione unica al centro d’Europa. Bollati Boringhieri: Torino, Italy,
  4. Duglio, S.; Bonadonna, A.; Letey, M.; Peira, G.; Zavattaro, L.; Lombardi, G. Tourism Development in Inner Mountain Areas—The Local Stakeholders’ Point of View through a Mixed Method Approach. Sustainability 2019, 11, 5997.
  5. Lupi, C.; Giaccio, V.; Mastronardi, L.; Giannelli, A.; Scardera, A. Exploring the features of agritourism and its contribution to rural development in Italy, Land Use Policy, 2017, 64, 383–390.

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rural tourism
  • mountain tourism
  • sustainable tourism
  • local communities
  • sustainable agriculture
  • food quality
  • agriculture and tourism chains integration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Perception of Ecosystem Services of Mountain Farming and of a Local Cheese: An Analysis for the Touristic Valorization of an Inner Alpine Area
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8017; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198017 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 626
Abstract
Mountain husbandry systems and their related products may directly or indirectly provide either ecosystem services (ESs) or disservices to humanity. The present study aims to evaluate the perception that a local mountain community has towards animal husbandry in the Lanzo Valleys (Piedmont, Italy) [...] Read more.
Mountain husbandry systems and their related products may directly or indirectly provide either ecosystem services (ESs) or disservices to humanity. The present study aims to evaluate the perception that a local mountain community has towards animal husbandry in the Lanzo Valleys (Piedmont, Italy) and towards the typical local dairy product, Toma di Lanzo, as well as to investigate the consumers’ habits and preferences, to detect possible positive impacts on mountain tourism. A questionnaire was delivered to 233 respondents. The perception of the impact was scored using a five-point Likert scale. The results show a very positive perception of the product Toma di Lanzo because of its origin and type of processing, with different perceptions of the local society depending on age (p < 0.01), residence (p < 0.01), and education level (p < 0.05). The respondents had a very positive awareness of the impact of mountain livestock farming in the Lanzo Valleys. The most important perceived ESs are cultural identity and maintenance of local breeds. Women, non-residents, and respondents with an intermediate education level generally had a more positive perception of ESs. There was a very low perception of disservices derived from mountain animal farming. The main perceived obstacles to the spread of benefits derived from these farming systems were the scarce presence of specific supporting politics and the low income generated by mountain farming activities. The coexistence of touristic activities and extensive livestock farming systems has to be associated with a better promotion of mountain products like Toma di Lanzo to improve the sustainability of mountain regions. Full article
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Article
The Attractive Power of Rural Destinations and a Synergistic Community Cooperative Approach: A “Tourismability” Case
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 7233; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177233 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1110
Abstract
The recent climate change, food scandals, pollution and work-related stress, are affecting life in big cities and tourism is suffering changes expanding its typical boundaries. The past decades were characterized by the tourism choice of exotic destinations; nowadays, a route inversion would be [...] Read more.
The recent climate change, food scandals, pollution and work-related stress, are affecting life in big cities and tourism is suffering changes expanding its typical boundaries. The past decades were characterized by the tourism choice of exotic destinations; nowadays, a route inversion would be visible and remote and inner destinations are acquiring value and attractiveness. According to this perspective, administrators and event organizers are planning and structuring strategies ensuring memorable experiences for the tourists. In the sense of sustainable development, important aspects are cooperative approaches and capability to integrate traditions and expectations. The proposed research work focuses the attention on the analysis of 15 semi-structured interviews through SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) and perception analysis on an event called “Dream of a night…to that town” provided by the Municipality of Colobraro, Basilicata Region (Italy). The proposition of the research would focus the attention on a case study able to form not a top-down/bottom-up, but a horizontal strategy, a sharable best practice for the whole tourism sector in rural areas that would make truly effective the State decentralization, in which the small communities’ activism configures crucial source of competitiveness. The case proposed, contrasting modern lifestyles and common tourism choice, would be able to redirect the concept of attractiveness in privileging remote places that could offer memorable tourism experiences. So, a promotional “tourismability” strategy, integrating agricultural connotates of the territory with heritage, traditions, myths and legends, through a synergistic community cooperative approach, would be necessary to constitute an identitary, attractive, memorable and immersive tourism experience in rural areas. Full article
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