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Sustainable Groundwater Remediation and Management

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2023) | Viewed by 3456

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Fluid Mechanics, Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Colón 7–11, 08222 Terrassa, Spain
Interests: groundwater; contamination; environmental engineering; modeling; geochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sustainability of groundwater remediation is a complex issue which covers three aspects: environmental impacts, economic viability, and social impacts. The environmental aspects of sustainability in remediation focus on maximizing the net environmental benefit of cleanup preserving remedy effectiveness and protecting human health and the environment.

“In situ” remediation techniques are, almost, innovative sustainable technologies widely accepted as an alternative to the “pump and treat” and other classical limited sustainable groundwater treatment technologies. The main objectives of this Special Issue are to evaluate the application and effectiveness of sustainable groundwater treatment technologies, especially air sparging, bioremediation, biostimulation, monitored natural attenuation (MNA), permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), reactive zones, in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), wetlands, and passive “in situ” mine water treatment systems.

In addition, groundwater transport models and management modeling used for decision-making in remediation case studies are of great interest.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but not limited to) the following: hydrogeology, contaminant hydrology, environmental engineering, groundwater modelling, management modelling, environmental fluid mechanics, geochemistry, and sustainable  remediation.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Andrés Navarro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable remediation
  • groundwater treatment
  • contamination
  • modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1534 KiB  
Article
Application of Magnesium Oxide for Metal Removal in Mine Water Treatment
by Andrés Navarro and María Izabel Martínez da Matta
Sustainability 2022, 14(23), 15857; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142315857 - 28 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1710
Abstract
In this study low-grade magnesium oxide (MgO) produced by calcinations of natural magnesite was used in mine water treatment using a laboratory-column device. The treatment of mine water from the abandoned Osor mine (NE Spain) with MgO showed the removal of metals from [...] Read more.
In this study low-grade magnesium oxide (MgO) produced by calcinations of natural magnesite was used in mine water treatment using a laboratory-column device. The treatment of mine water from the abandoned Osor mine (NE Spain) with MgO showed the removal of metals from both mine water and tailing leachates. The PHREEQC numerical code and the Geochemist’s Workbench code (GWB) were used to evaluate the speciation of dissolved constituents and calculate the saturation state of the effluents. The analysis of the treated mine water showed the removal of As (from 1.59 to 0.31 μg/L), Cd (from 1.98 to <0.05 μg/L), Co (from 19.1 to <0.03 μg/L), F (from 2730 to 200 μg/L), Mn (from 841 to 0.6 μg/L), Ni (from 17.9 to <2 μg/L, U (from 9.16 to 0.08 μg/L), and Zn (from 2900 to 68.5 μg/L). Pb was also removed (from 98 to 35.2 μg/L) in the treatment of contaminated leachates from the mine waste. The mixing of MgO and water at room temperature may promote the formation of a stabilizing agent composed of hydroxides, carbonates, and magnesium-silicate-hydrates (MSH), which may remove Cd, Zn, and similar metals by sorption on MSH, substitution on the MSH lattice, and precipitation or co-precipitation with some of the hydrated phases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Groundwater Remediation and Management)
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8 pages, 1953 KiB  
Article
Interelectrode Distance Analysis in the Water Defluoridation by Electrocoagulation Reactor
by Jesús Fernando Martínez-Villafañe, Juan Carlos Ortiz-Cuellar, Jesús Salvador Galindo-Valdés, Francisco Cepeda-Rodríguez, Josué Gómez-Casas, Nelly Abigaíl Rodríguez-Rosales, Oziel Gómez-Casas and Carlos Rodrigo Muñiz-Valdez
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12096; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912096 - 24 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1099
Abstract
In this research, the effect of the interelectrode distance (d) in the electrocoagulation (EC) reactor was studied. The experiments were carried out with varying d in values of 3, 5, and 9 mm during the treatment of water contaminated with fluoride (F [...] Read more.
In this research, the effect of the interelectrode distance (d) in the electrocoagulation (EC) reactor was studied. The experiments were carried out with varying d in values of 3, 5, and 9 mm during the treatment of water contaminated with fluoride (F). The response variables analyzed were the treatment time necessary to reduce the residual concentration of F to 1.5 mg L−1, the number of aluminum hydroxides formed, the potential drop in the reactor terminals, and the electric power consumption of the reactor. The software FLUENT version 6.3 was employed to simulate the liquid velocity profiles achieved in the reactor chamber. The results obtained show that the liquid velocity increases in the interelectrode spaces to 0.48, 0.65, and 0.86 m s−1 for interelectrode distances of 9, 5, and 3 mm, respectively, which favors not only the formation of flocs but also the elimination of fluoride. With a shorter interelectrode distance, the EC reactor not only consumes less electrical energy but also fewer electrodes, and the dispersion of generated flocs in the reactor chamber is major, which is more important than the quantity of flocs generated in it. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Groundwater Remediation and Management)
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