Circum-Neutral Mine Waters and Mine Wastes Geochemistry

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2020) | Viewed by 8235

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Fluid Mechanics, Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Colón 7–11, 08222 Terrassa, Spain
Interests: groundwater; contamination; environmental engineering; modeling; geochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Circum-neutral mine waters (CNMW) are commonly of environmental concern because of the possible mobilization of As, Sb, Se, Mo, Cd, Zn, and other metals, in the pH–Eh conditions of these mine waters.

Special Issue will explore all the major processes resulting from the weathering of mine wastes related to circum-neutral mine drainage. Thus, this Special Issue invites work on the geochemical processes concerning CNMW generation mechanisms, microbiological activity, and its relevance to mineral weathering and main water and gas flow and solute transport processes.

Furthermore, water quality prediction based on laboratory static and kinetic leaching tests will also be considered.

Predictive modeling tools (inverse modeling geochemical and reactive transport models) and available predictive mathematical models will be considered.

In addition, metal removal from CNMW may be considered, taking into account that mine drainage from abandoned surface and underground mines may be treated in several ways including passive remediation systems. The use of alternative reactive materials to lime and caustic soda for hydroxide precipitation has been proposed in some studies.

Dr. Andrés Navarro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Circum-neutral mine waters microanalytical techniques
  • Mine wastes
  • Metals
  • Geochemistry
  • pH
  • Environmental

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 5835 KiB  
Article
Influence of Hydrofluoric Acid Leaching and Roasting on Mineralogical Phase Transformation of Pyrite in Sulfidic Mine Tailings
by Babak Koohestani, Ahmad Khodadadi Darban, Pozhhan Mokhtari, Esmaeel Darezereshki, Erol Yilmaz and Elif Yilmaz
Minerals 2020, 10(6), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10060513 - 01 Jun 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3512
Abstract
Under the oxidative roasting process, pyrite, as a major mineral in sulfidic mine tailings, can transform to iron oxides. Generated iron oxides, if exhibiting enough magnetic properties, can be recovered via magnetic separation resulting in partial mine tailings valorization. However, due to the [...] Read more.
Under the oxidative roasting process, pyrite, as a major mineral in sulfidic mine tailings, can transform to iron oxides. Generated iron oxides, if exhibiting enough magnetic properties, can be recovered via magnetic separation resulting in partial mine tailings valorization. However, due to the presence of various minerals and sintering possibility, it is advantageous to remove impurities and increase the pyrite content of mine tailings prior to the roasting procedure. In this case, hydrofluoric acid that has no influence on pyrite can be used to leach most inorganic minerals, including aluminosilicates. Therefore, this study investigated and compared the influence of the roasting process with and without hydrofluoric acid leaching pretreatment on mineralogical phase transformation of pyrite and magnetic properties of thermally generated minerals. Several tests and analyses were performed to study mineralogical phase transformation, morphology, elemental composition, surface characterization, and magnetic properties. Results of this study indicated that without acid leaching pretreatment, pyrite was mainly transformed to hematite. However, via acid leaching, fluorine, as a more electronegative element over oxygen, entered the compound and neglected the role of oxygen in thermal oxidation, instead reducing sulfur content of pyrite to only form pyrrhotite. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circum-Neutral Mine Waters and Mine Wastes Geochemistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1688 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Distribution of Some Potentially Harmful Elements (PHEs) in the Krugersdorp Game Reserve, Gauteng, South Africa
by Michael Shapi, Maryam Amra Jordaan, Devandren Subramoney Nadasan, Theophilus C. Davies, Emmanuel Chirenje, Mpumelelo Dube and Mammusa R. Lekoa
Minerals 2020, 10(2), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020151 - 10 Feb 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4127
Abstract
The Mintails Mogale Gold (MMG) and the Rand Uranium (RU) are two large-scale mining consortiums active in re-mining old tailings dams and dumps in Krugersdorp and are a source of mine discharge feed into the Krugersdorp Game Reserve (KGR). This has resulted in [...] Read more.
The Mintails Mogale Gold (MMG) and the Rand Uranium (RU) are two large-scale mining consortiums active in re-mining old tailings dams and dumps in Krugersdorp and are a source of mine discharge feed into the Krugersdorp Game Reserve (KGR). This has resulted in a noticeable accumulation of potentially harmful elements (PHEs) over a number of years. Efforts were implemented to interpret the concentration levels of PHEs in soils of the study areas of which a total of 36 georeferenced soil samples were collected (in triplicate) from the MMG, RU and KGR, including samples from farmlands and waterways adjacent to the mining sites. Samples were then analysed by both inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for 36 elements. From the 36 elements of this study, detailed evaluations of the occurrence of 12 selected elements were discussed. The geochemical landscape at the KGR is shown to be in flux. The major mediating influences on the behaviour of As, Co, Cu, Hg and Pb, as they enter the KGR largely in the form of acid mine drainage (AMD), are the geological substrate (mostly in carbonate form). Analysis of the soils showed high levels of contamination for As and Co in ppm. The mean maximum of As ranged from (5.00–170.30) with the highest level found in the Krugersdorp site. The mean maximum of Co ranged from (46.00–102.30) with the highest level found in MMG. All of these values were well above the recommended maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) values, i.e., As (15–20) and Co (20–50). The mean maximum values for Pb (12.40–92.30); Cu (18.50–115.30) and Hg (12.40–92.30) content in surface soils of all four segments studied falls well within the MAC range for agricultural soils i.e., Cu (60–150); Hg (0.5–5) and Pb (20–300). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circum-Neutral Mine Waters and Mine Wastes Geochemistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop