Special Issue "Instruments for Measuring Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): The Special Case of Human Resource Management (HRM)"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Macarena Lopez-Fernandez
Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciendas Ecónomicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain
Interests: Strategic Human Resource Management (HRM); Socially Responsible HRM (SR-HRM); organizational behaviour; managerial skills
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Pedro M. Romero-Fernández
Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciendas Ecónomicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Cadiz, Cadiz, Spain
Interests: Strategic Human Resource Management (HRM); Socially Responsible HRM (SR-HRM); intellectual capital; organizational behavior; sustainable HRM

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

CSR is an innovative and promising area that generates great interest not only among academics but also among the companies themselves due to, among other aspects, the influence that it has on both internal and external effects of the organization—that is, in the day to day management of the company and in achieving greater organizational performance, as well as in the contribution that it makes to sustainability (with the triple bottom line—economic, social and environmental results) (Aguilera et al., 2007; Stankevičiūtė and Savanevičienė, 2018; Svensson and Wood, 2011).

This growing field of research presents important challenges for academics to work on. One of the most important of these involves the measurement of CSR, since the literature on this topic is inconsistent and lacks practical maturity (Jamali et al., 2015; Voegtlin and Greenwood, 2016). That is why many authors point out the need to promote the discipline by establishing mechanisms that allow an objective and effective evaluation and comparison of the contributions that are made in the different (functional) areas of the company to the CSR approach and the value that is added to its different stakeholders (e.g., Blowfield, 2005; Jamali et al., 2015). This contribution would help firms to identify how Socially Responsible they are in different organizational areas and to what extent they contribute to sustainability.

This Special Issue is focused on filling this gap in the research. Specifically, it is focused on socially Responsible Human Resource Management (SR-HRM). Although efforts to define and specify the particular actions covered by SR-HRM can be found in the literature (e.g., Barrena-Martínez et al., 2017; Diaz-Carrion et al., 2018; Dupont et al., 2013; Jamali et al., 2015), there is a need to improve understanding of this discipline by establishing mechanisms that effectively allow its evaluation and comparison in a systematic way (Aust et al., 2018). In this sense, we invite you to send your contributions on measurement instruments to evaluate aspects including but not limited to:

  • The contribution of talent management to CSR;
  • The relationship between organizational behaviour (leadership, motivation, satisfaction, team management, culture, etc.) and CSR;
  • The measurement of Social Responsibility within HRM;
  • SR-HRM as a process to promote employees’ well-being;
  • Evaluation of environmental, economic, and social aspects of SR-HRM;
  • Analysis of the main deficiencies of the current SR-HRM and sustainable indicators;
  • The relationship between employee relations and SR-HRM.

All manuscripts will be reviewed by experts in the field and must be submitted no later than the end of 31st January 2020.

References:

Aguilera, R.V.; Rupp, D.E.; Williams, C. A.; Ganapathi, J. Putting the S back in corporate social responsibility: A multilevel theory of social change in organizations. Academy of Management Review 2007, 32(3), 836-863.

Aust, I.; Muller-Camen, M.; Poutsma, E. SR-HRM: A comparative and international perspective. In Handbook of Research in Comparative Human Resource Management, 2nd ed; Brewster, C., Farndale, E., Mayrhofer, W., Eds.; Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, pp. 358-369.

Barrena-Martínez, J.; López-Fernández, M.; Romero-Fernández, P.M. Towards a configuration of socially responsible human resource management policies and practices: findings from an academic consensus. The International Journal of Human Resource Management 2017, 1-37.

Blowfield, M. Corporate Social Responsibility: reinventing the meaning of development?. International Affairs 2005, 81(3), 515-524.

Díaz-Carrión, R.; López-Fernández, M.; Romero-Fernández, P.M. Evidence of different models of Socially Responsible HRM in Europe. Business Ethics: A European Review 2018, 18(1), 1-18.

Dupont, C.; Ferauge, P.; Giuliano, R. The impact of corporate social responsibility on human resource management: GDF SUEZ’s case. International Business Research 2013, 6(12), 145- 155.


Jamali, D.; Safieddine, A.M.; Rabbath, M. Corporate governance and corporate social responsibility synergies and interrelationships. Corporate Governance: An International Review 2008, 16(5), 443-459.

Stankevičiūtė, Z.; Savanevičienė, A. Designing Sustainable HRM: The Core Characteristics of Emerging Field. Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4798.

Svensson, G.; Wood, G. A model of cause-related marketing for “profit-driven” and “non-profit” organizations. European business review 2011, 23(2), 203-214.

Voegtlin, C.; Greenwood, M. Corporate social responsibility and human resource management: A systematic review and conceptual analysis. Huma Resource Management Review 2016, 26(3): 181-197.

Dr. Macarena Lopez-Fernandez
Dr. Pedro M. Romero-Fernández
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Measurement
  • Socially Responsible Human Resource Management (SR-HRM)
  • Sustainability
  • Instruments

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Corporate Social Responsibility and Employees’ Negative Behaviors under Abusive Supervision: A Multilevel Insight
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2647; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072647 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
This study attempts to advance the current research debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the micro-level by empirically examining the effect of perceived CSR on employee behaviors such as turnover intention and workplace deviance with the mediation mechanism of organizational identification. The [...] Read more.
This study attempts to advance the current research debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the micro-level by empirically examining the effect of perceived CSR on employee behaviors such as turnover intention and workplace deviance with the mediation mechanism of organizational identification. The boundary condition of group-level abusive supervision also enhances the novelty of this research. Social identity theory is used for hypotheses development. Multilevel data is collected from 410 middle managers working in thirteen commercial banks in Pakistan by conducting three surveys with temporal breaks. Our results suggest that employees’ perceived CSR is statistically and inversely related to their turnover intention and deviant behavior, along with the mediation mechanism of organizational identification. Further, this relationship is weakened with the moderation of abusive supervision. Specifically, our findings indicate that employees’ positive CSR perceptions minimize their undesired workplace behaviors through the mediation of organizational identification. But this effect becomes less effective with the contingency of abusive supervision. Our results reveal several means by which organizations can manage their CSR initiatives and human resources, for instance by concentrating on abusive supervision while evaluating their employees’ behavior. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Mapping the Link between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Human Resource Management (HRM): How Is This Relationship Measured?
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1678; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041678 - 24 Feb 2020
Abstract
Despite the relevance of human resources in the management of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), confusion and theoretical chaos are still evident in the area. This manuscript provides a systematic review of the link between CSR and Human Resource Management (HRM), stressing the main [...] Read more.
Despite the relevance of human resources in the management of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), confusion and theoretical chaos are still evident in the area. This manuscript provides a systematic review of the link between CSR and Human Resource Management (HRM), stressing the main topics along with the evolution and tendencies founded in this field. SciMAT was used to conduct a conceptual science mapping analysis based on co-word bibliographic networks. From 2006 to 2019, 194 documents were retrieved from the Web of Science. Considering the last period (2017–2019), the motor themes (those which are well-developed and relevant for the structure of the research field) were environmental management (including green HRM), sustainable HRM and pro-environmental behaviour. Socially responsible HRM (SR-HRM) was a basic theme (important, although not developed). Perceived organisational support was a specialised theme (well-developed, although less important), and employee commitment was an emerging theme (both weakly developed and marginal). In addition, a review of the measurement tools used in the main topics extracted from the previous analysis was carried out. Our analysis will help inform researchers and practitioners on the future of CSR and HRM and the previous efforts in the creation of measurement instruments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Resource Management: Towards Sustainable Business Organizations
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030841 - 22 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Today’s organizations are immersed in a global market, where any detail can provide a competitive advantage over rival companies and condition their sustainability. Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Resource Management have become very powerful tools within companies. However, the potential, development, and measurement [...] Read more.
Today’s organizations are immersed in a global market, where any detail can provide a competitive advantage over rival companies and condition their sustainability. Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Resource Management have become very powerful tools within companies. However, the potential, development, and measurement of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Human Resource Management (HRM) have not been sufficiently explored. The literature has developed multiple case studies on CSR and HRM and has studied the combination of both factors and their link to economic, environmental, and social sustainability, but has not yet found a solid basis from which to address the new functionality of CSR, HRM, and sustainable business management. This work aims to investigate trends in scientific production related to Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Resource Management. Bibliometric techniques and SciMAT software have been used for this purpose. A total of 314 articles from Web of Science (WOS) indexed journals were analyzed. The results obtained confirm that the interest in the study of these concepts has grown exponentially in the last decade. It should be noted that the definitions of CSR and HRM, and even the relationship between the two, continue to be subject to multiple interpretations. The contribution of this work lies in the fact that, through the longitudinal analysis carried out, light is shed on the groups of issues that emerge with special projection, such as green-management, stakeholders, commitment, competitive-advantage, satisfaction, performance, sustainability, or research-methods-analysis, and which must continue to be explored in order to respond to the demands that business organizations have in this respect, and to help the total integration of the different approaches related to CSR and HRM. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Social Responsibility toward the Employees and Career Development Sustainability during Manufacturing Transformation in China
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4778; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174778 - 02 Sep 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
In an era of industrial transformation, manufacturing employees have faced significant threats (e.g., Artificial Intelligence technologies). Against such a backdrop, this study empirically examined the relationship between social responsibility toward the employees (CSRe) and career development sustainability, since non-contractual organizational supports are as [...] Read more.
In an era of industrial transformation, manufacturing employees have faced significant threats (e.g., Artificial Intelligence technologies). Against such a backdrop, this study empirically examined the relationship between social responsibility toward the employees (CSRe) and career development sustainability, since non-contractual organizational supports are as important for employees’ career development as those outlined within contracts. We examined relevant issues in the Chinese manufacturing industry by using decision tree analysis coupled with grey relation processing. CSRe was conceptualized by four dimensions: working benefit, working environment, working hours, and training, while career development sustainability was captured from the perspectives of career growth and employability. The results indicated that four factors of social responsibility toward employees were positively associated with career growth and employability under career development sustainability. In addition, the strongest correlation was between training and career growth as well as employability. This study contributes by enriching the current research on corporate social responsibility from the standpoint of employees, and also generates implications for career development sustainability. Studying in a context of timely importance, this paper has practical implications for manufacturers to respond to the human resource dilemma under the impact of new technology, and thus could help employees embark on a long-term career path, which is conducive to socially sustainable development. Full article
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