sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Cognitive Studies Related to Sustainable, Resilient and Regenerative Design for Architecture and Environments"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 2253

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jae Kyung Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea
Interests: algorithmic design; digital fabrication; material practice
Prof. Dr. Eun Joo Park
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Korea
Interests: urban and architectural design; sustainable architecture; community participation planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are living in an era of uncertainty, experiencing unexpected transformations due to critical issues related to climate, particulates and viruses threatening people’s safety and health. The role of design in architecture and the environment is becoming more crucial for the quality of people’s life in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, since architecture and environment are supposed to be a shelter for people who are undergoing such changes.

This Special Issue is interested in how sustainable, resilient and regenerative design for architecture and the environment can be achieved for supporting people's wellness and wellbeing. It is expected that people’s physical and mental health would be restored and their chronic stress would be resolved in such architecture and environment. Cognitive studies for it should be performed with a user-centered approach to the design of architecture and environment.

This Special Issue welcomes research contributions on cognitive studies related to the sustainable, resilient and regenerative development of our environments, in which the role of design is emphasized. We solicit interdisciplinary articles including environmental psychology, architecture, engineering, social sciences and technologies to share approaches to the proposed topic. 

Prof. Dr. Mi Jeong Kim
Prof. Jae Kyung Kim
Prof. Dr. Eun Joo Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable architecture
  • resilient environment
  • regenerative design
  • cognitive studies to design and environment
  • biophilic design
  • social distancing
  • post-pandemic
  • tactical urbanism

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Greenness Index and Preferences for Interior Landscapes in Residential Spaces
Sustainability 2022, 14(9), 5183; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095183 - 25 Apr 2022
Viewed by 333
Abstract
Modern people have limited opportunities to experience the natural environment due to reduced outdoor activity time and are not provided with enough opportunities to encounter landscape, even in indoor spaces. Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, the time spent indoors is getting longer. [...] Read more.
Modern people have limited opportunities to experience the natural environment due to reduced outdoor activity time and are not provided with enough opportunities to encounter landscape, even in indoor spaces. Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, the time spent indoors is getting longer. As the number of health-conscious people increases, interest in the introduction of indoor plants, which help purify the air and improve emotional stability, has increased. This study aimed to identify the direction of creating interior landscapes in residential spaces by examining the Greenness Index (GI) and resident preferences. This study targeted 65 households in residential spaces with over two rooms and growing plants. Pictures and descriptions of interior spaces were collected and analyzed. Case studies were conducted to analyze interior landscape planning preferences. The results indicated that public spaces (72.3%) contained foliage plants (98.5%) and containers using soil (93.8%). Residents perceived all components, from plants to containers, considering the GI. Residents’ subjective perceived GI (15% on average) was higher than the objective GI (10% on average) calculated from photos. Psychological stability and visual beauty were high for all items. Preferred locations for interior landscapes were living rooms (55.4%), which are public spaces, and living room verandas (38.5%), which are functional spaces, with foliage plants (52.3%) being predominant. These findings indicated that interior landscape could link the indoor environment in residential spaces and external spaces using nature, creating aesthetic and environmental effects indoors. Furthermore, this study is meaningful, as it identified residents’ preferences for interior landscape planning in residential spaces. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Residents’ Spatial-Usage Behavior and Interaction According to the Spatial Configuration of a Social Housing Complex: A Comparison between High-Rise Apartments and Perimeter Block Housing
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1138; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031138 - 20 Jan 2022
Viewed by 405
Abstract
It has been claimed that high-rise apartments, unlike perimeter block housing, cause social pathology; however, no studies have quantitatively proven this. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the difference between space-use behavior and social interactions with a focus on high-rise apartments, the main [...] Read more.
It has been claimed that high-rise apartments, unlike perimeter block housing, cause social pathology; however, no studies have quantitatively proven this. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the difference between space-use behavior and social interactions with a focus on high-rise apartments, the main residential mode in South Korea, and the newly created perimeter block housing. This was done by first comparing and analyzing the spatial configurations of high-rise apartments and perimeter block housing using the space syntax methodology. Second, the space-use behaviors that affect interaction were explained by regression analysis after analyzing correlations among the spatial configurations of individual residence locations, the frequency of use of community facilities, and interaction. Third, differences in interaction for people living in complexes with different spatial configurations were analyzed using t-tests. The main finding was that people whose living arrangements include a good spatial configuration or that often use children’s playgrounds interact more. Additionally, when the spatial configuration of a complex is systematic and the complex is closely connected to the city, the interaction between neighbors appears better. The results of this study demonstrate that block housing promotes interaction, which will be helpful for establishing new planning standards for sustainable apartments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Identifying Health Care Environment Contradictions in Terms of Infection Control during a Pandemic with a Focus on Health Workers’ Experience
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9964; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179964 - 06 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 847
Abstract
During the past year, health care environments have struggled to cope with the various impacts of COVID-19 around the world. Health care facilities need to help strengthen resistance to pathogen threats and provide care for patients and health workers in the safest possible [...] Read more.
During the past year, health care environments have struggled to cope with the various impacts of COVID-19 around the world. Health care facilities need to help strengthen resistance to pathogen threats and provide care for patients and health workers in the safest possible way. Architectural design strategies can play a significant role in infection prevention and control. The current study aims to examine the experiences of health workers with hospital spaces during the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying the difficulties they face, the present study attempts to shed light on the role of the health care layout configuration in combating pandemics. The authors conducted observations at four hospitals and a series of online semi-structured interviews with 162 health care staff from March to May 2020. The study indicated that space configuration and the hospitalization of patients, layout and circulation of the environment, operation services such as indoor environment conditions, maintenance of health care system, and organizational support for health care staff were the most critical factors affecting infection control in health care environments. The initial zoning and separation of patients were the most effective methods of controlling infection. Hospitals with clustered plan layouts were found to be the most effective buildings for the zoning of COVID-19 patients during the pandemic and for infection control. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop