Special Issue "Cultural, Creative and Sustainable Cities"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 March 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Mrs. Valentina Montalto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra, Italy
Interests: cultural statistics; cultural indicators; cultural economics and policy; small and medium-sized cities; sustainable tourism; urban strategies
Prof. Dr. Pier Luigi Sacco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Humanities, IULM University Milan, Via Carlo Bo, 1, 20143 Milano Italy; RLL Department, Harvard University Cambridge MA, Boylston Hall, Cambridge MA 02138 USA; FBK-IRVAPP, Via S. Croce 77, 38122 Trento, Italy
Interests: cultural economics and policy; behavioral science and public policy; evolutionary game theory and social behavior; social cognition; social neuroscience and economics; computational social sciences
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Michaela Saisana
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra, Italy
Interests: composite indicators; scoreboards and monitoring tools to feed into a wide range of policy fields (social rights, fairness, innovation, competitiveness, enterprises and firms, state aid, employment, culture and creativity, cohesion and sustainable development …)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor has been developed by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission to help policy makers identify local strengths and opportunities and benchmark their cities against similar urban centres. The Monitor offers a fully accessible database of 29 carefully selected indicators covering 190 cities in Europe. The analysis shows the polycentric pattern of Europe’s cultural assets, which offers local authorities the opportunity to design diverse and context-specific strategies. In particular, medium-sized cities appear to have, on average, more cultural facilities per inhabitant than larger cities. The paper presenting these findings is among the top social media articles in 2019–20.

The last two decades have recorded a massive increase of interest in culture as a major resource for sustainable development. Nevertheless, the practical implementation of culture-led strategies remains a challenge. The varied impacts of culture are indeed difficult to monitor, as they cover many different domains of the economy, society and individuals’ lives. While the Monitor succeeds in breaking from a narrow economic perspective of culture by including, for instance, indicators of cultural participation, diversity and openness, its full potential to address relevant policy research questions is yet to be explored.

This Special Issue welcomes theoretical and empirical contributions that aim to provide deeper insight in all aspects of culture and sustainable development in cities, e.g., inclusiveness, reduced inequalities, green growth/tourism and health and wellbeing. Empirical analyses showing the relationship between the Cultural and Creative Cities’ performance and sustainability goals/green indicators will be particularly appreciated. Applications of the Cultural and Creative Cities model to other geographical contexts or units are also welcome. Theoretical contributions with a sound conceptual basis on the future scope of the Monitor, with a focus on cultural sustainability metrics, are of interest as well.

Mrs. Valentina Montalto
Prof. Dr. Pier Luigi Sacco
Dr. Michaela Saisana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • culture and environmental sustainability
  • culture and green growth
  • culture and social cohesion
  • culture and social inclusion
  • culture and health and wellbeing
  • culture and sustainable tourism
  • creative and sustainable cities

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploring Creative Tourism Based on the Cultural and Creative Cities (C3) Index and Using Bootstrap Confidence Intervals
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5145; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095145 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 254
Abstract
Creative tourism is a novel segment of the tourism market that may turn into a great opportunity for small cities to attract visitors. Thus, it can be a possible economic and social driver for local development. Despite its potentiality, not much empirical research [...] Read more.
Creative tourism is a novel segment of the tourism market that may turn into a great opportunity for small cities to attract visitors. Thus, it can be a possible economic and social driver for local development. Despite its potentiality, not much empirical research has been conducted to explore the specific strengths and weaknesses of developing creative tourism in small cities, probably due to the lack of reliable data. Our study aims to fill this gap by using the C3 Index, a composite indicator developed by the Joint Research Center-European Commission, as the data source, and the bootstrap method as a statistical tool to detect significant differences between small and large cities. Our findings reveal that the smallest cities show positive features to foster creative tourism (e.g., they have at least as good cultural infrastructures and cultural participation as the largest cities). However, in some other aspects, small cities still have room to improve (e.g., improvements in local and international connections or further development of the cultural and creative sector). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural, Creative and Sustainable Cities)
Back to TopTop