sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

New Advanced Techniques for Assessing Soil Chemistry

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Chemical Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 1977

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil and Environment, Soil Chemistry, Campus Ultuna, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lomma, Sweden
Interests: trace metal speciation in soil and water; X-ray absorption spectroscopy; geochemical equilibrium modeling; contaminated soil, soil chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A good knowledge of the soil chemistry status is of great interest regarding important topics such as soil fertility, contamination problems, eutrophication, acidification, and climate change. Lately, more advanced tools for assessing soil chemistry have been developed. These include X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for studying the speciation of nutrients (e.g., phosphourus and calcium) and potentially toxic elements (PTE) (metals and metalloids). New techniques that use the micro- and nanosized mapping of elements including synchrotron µ-XRF (microfocused X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy), which can show spatial distribution patterns in the soil and correlations of elements in space. Furthermore, this technique can be coupled with speciation methods such as µ-XAS and µ-XRD (X-ray diffraction). Another set of valuable tools for evaluating soil chemistry include geochemical models for speciation, solubility prediction, weathering, nutrient cycling, acidification, eutrophication, and the transport of elements.

Since soils often have a complex composition and can be highly heterogenous, it is seldom enough with only one technique for a full view, therefore studies with a combination of techniques are highly valuable.

The scope of this Special Issue is to highlight new, state-of-the-art research regarding these topics, in order to better evaluate the soil chemistry status of soils around the world.

Dr. Carin Sjöstedt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil chemistry
  • analytical chemistry
  • element speciation
  • trace elements
  • phosphorus
  • soil fertility
  • contaminated soil
  • eutrophication
  • acidification
  • climate change
  • eutrophication
  • weathering
  • µ-XRF
  • XANES
  • EXAFS
  • XRD
  • geochemical equilibrium models
  • transport models

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 4840 KiB  
Article
New Methodologies for the Surface Application of Limestone and Gypsum in Different Crop Systems
by Wander Luis Barbosa Borges, Pedro Henrique Gatto Juliano, Isabela Malaquias Dalto de Souza, Letícia Nayara Fuzaro Rodrigues, Jorge Luiz Hipólito and Marcelo Andreotti
Sustainability 2022, 14(14), 8926; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14148926 - 21 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1451
Abstract
To address the problems of soil acidity (pH values below 4.4) in surface and subsurface soil layers and improve soil chemical fertility, this study evaluated three methodologies for surface application of limestone (LS) (ensuring that calcium (Ca)2+ occupied 70%, 60% or 50% [...] Read more.
To address the problems of soil acidity (pH values below 4.4) in surface and subsurface soil layers and improve soil chemical fertility, this study evaluated three methodologies for surface application of limestone (LS) (ensuring that calcium (Ca)2+ occupied 70%, 60% or 50% of cation exchange capacity (CEC) at a depth of 0.0–0.2 m) and gypsum (GP, phosphogypsum) (ensuring that Ca2+ occupied 60%, 50% or 40% of effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) at a depth of 0.2–0.4 m). LS and GP were applied in a conventional pasture system (CPS), no-till system (NTS), and agropastoral system (APS) in an Arenic Hapludult in Brazil. Surface application of LS and GP using these three methodologies corrected surface and subsurface acidity and improved soil chemical fertility. Specifically, Ca2+ content increased in the CPS, NTS, and APS at a depth of 0.0–0.2 m and in the CPS and APS at a depth of 0.2–0.4 m; sulfur (S)-SO42− content and Ca2+/ECEC increased in the CPS, NTS, and APS at a depth of 0.2–0.4 m; base saturation (BS) increased and aluminum (Al)3+ content decreased in the NTS and APS at depths of 0.0–0.2 m and 0.2–0.4 m; and pH, magnesium (Mg)2+ content, CEC, Ca2+/CEC, and Mg2+/CEC increased and total acidity decreased in the NTS and APS at a depth of 0.0–0.2 m. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advanced Techniques for Assessing Soil Chemistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop