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Special Issue "Urban Agriculture and Sustainable Urban Development Planning"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 2072

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jana Šiftová
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Social Geography and Regional Development, Charles University, 128 43 Prague, Czechia
Interests: food geography; urban agriculture; urban gardening; sustainable development; sustainable consumption; food systems; sustainable food planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The scope of growing activities within the city is still expanding, documenting a huge potential of urban agriculture (UA). A fast-growing body of literature documents the benefits of UA from improving individual health, increasing access to fresh fruits and vegetables, creating opportunities for community building, and fostering civic engagement and social learning to critical pieces of the sustainability movement providing green infrastructure, edible landscapes, and political spaces attached to issues of food security and food justice, etc. Food connects the questions of health, well-being, social equity, environmental justice, and sustainable development.

Practitioner-oriented scholars also reflected these trends and indulged themselves in the study of this phenomenon. In particular, the planning and public health scholars made a considerable effort to appraise UA´s possible contributions to the urban food systems and identify the best practices for policy and planning. The American Planning Association published the first Policy Guide on Community and Regional Food Planning in 2007. Within the Association of European Planning Schools, a Sustainable Food Planning group was established in 2009. Indeed, urban food production and planning are close allies. Transforming urban spaces into productive landscapes for UA became a key concern for many urban planning agendas. Supported by UA´s positive contribution to many urban sustainability issues, municipal officials across the world are drafting policies to foster urban food production. The first “global” food policy document (the Milano Food Charter) was signed in 2015. Despite all these efforts to create a suitable policy environment, there is still a lack of structural, political, and legislative tools for this goal in urban spatial planning. This Special Issue should identify the key challenges confronting UA in the realms of practice, policy, and planning, and where possible, propose solutions to these challenges.

For this Special Issue, we invite papers that explore new dimensions—both practical and theoretical—of the emerging field of urban food planning and urban agriculture. We welcome a great variety of empirical work, including case and comparative studies, documenting the effective work towards the inclusive, just, and environmentally friendly transition to a sustainable urban food system with the help of urban agriculture in any geographical context. We also encourage conceptual papers which reveal new aspects of hybrid food-governance arrangements and experiment with alternative policies and approaches to sustainable urban development and urban agriculture´s role within food planning.

Example of potential paper topics:

- diverse forms of urban agriculture involved within local and regional planning policies (community gardens, home gardens, urban farms, therapeutic gardens, vertical farms, rooftop gardens, etc.)

- the role of a range of local actors and agents of change in the urban food system planning (citizens, consumers, NGOs, communities, grassroot activists, scientists, educators, influencers, food-service providers, food producers, retailers, etc.)

- stories around shorter food chains and circular economies within the approaches to sustainable urban food systems (sharing; bartering; food banks; zero-waste; community supported agriculture; community kitchens; cooperatives)

- evidence of urban planning and design tools which facilitate urban (and periurban) agriculture

- unintended consequences of urban agriculture and greening efforts through alternative food initiatives (green gentrification; unequal access to productive land; exclusive character of some UA movements)

Dr. Jana Šiftová
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban agriculture
  • sustainable development
  • food planning
  • food system
  • policy
  • equity
  • justice
  • environment
  • community

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Towards a More Sustainable Urban Food System—Carbon Emissions Assessment of a Diet Transition with the FEWprint Platform
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1797; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031797 - 04 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 797
Abstract
The production, processing, and transportation of food, in particular animal-based products, imposes great environmental burden on the planet. The current food supply system often constitutes a considerable part of the total carbon emissions of urban communities in industrialised cities. Urban food production (UFP) [...] Read more.
The production, processing, and transportation of food, in particular animal-based products, imposes great environmental burden on the planet. The current food supply system often constitutes a considerable part of the total carbon emissions of urban communities in industrialised cities. Urban food production (UFP) is a method that can potentially diminish food emissions. In parallel, a shift towards a predominantly plant-based diet that meets the nutritional protein intake is an effective method to curtail carbon emissions from food. Considering the high land use associated with the production of animal-based products, such a shift will prompt a community food demand that is more inclined to be satisfied with local production. Therefore, during the design process of a future low-carbon city, the combined application of both methods is worth exploring. This work introduces, describes, and demonstrates the diet shift component of the FEWprint platform, a user friendly UFP assessment platform for designers that is constructed around the broader three-pronged strategy of evaluation, shift, and design. For three neighborhoods, in Amsterdam, Belfast, and Detroit, the contextual consumption and country-specific environmental footprint data are applied to simulate a theoretical community-wide diet shift from a conventional to a vegan diet, whilst maintaining protein intake equilibrium. The results show that in total terms, the largest carbon mitigation potential awaits in Detroit (−916 kg CO2eq/cap/year), followed by Belfast (−866 kg) and Amsterdam (−509 kg). In relative terms, the carbon reduction potential is largest in Belfast (−25%), followed by Amsterdam (−15%) and Detroit (−7%). The FEWprint can be used to generate preliminary figures on the carbon implications of dietary adaptations and can be employed to give a first indication of the potential of UFP in urban communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agriculture and Sustainable Urban Development Planning)
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Article
Vindication of Linking Social Capital Capacity to Urban Agriculture: A Paradigm of Participation Based on Social Empowerment in Klang Valley, Malaysia
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1509; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031509 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 673
Abstract
With the rise of urbanization, the Malaysian government faces a tough challenge in ensuring food and nutrition security, especially for the disadvantaged urban populations. Urban agriculture (UA) seems to be a feasible approach to be undertaken by the government to overcome urban food [...] Read more.
With the rise of urbanization, the Malaysian government faces a tough challenge in ensuring food and nutrition security, especially for the disadvantaged urban populations. Urban agriculture (UA) seems to be a feasible approach to be undertaken by the government to overcome urban food insecurity. In distinguishing UA as a vital element of sustainable urban development, the primary challenge is to develop effective programs that engage urban dwellers and organizations through good design and implementation. Additionally, empowering communities through UA programs is challenging. Hence, the major aim of this study is to ascertain the assigned and underlying values of UA participation amongst communities that contribute to aspects of community social empowerment in Klang Valley, Malaysia. The dataset for the study was taken from the respondents (180) who were the participants of UA community programs authorized by the Department of Agriculture in Klang Valley area, and a Structural Equation Modelling using Partial Least Square (PLS-SEM) was utilized to integrate the interdependencies between multiple variables. The findings revealed the important role of participation in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of UA programs to ensure success. Participation should be seen through the roles of agencies, NGOs, and communities in order to build a strong network crucial to the enhancement of social empowerment among participants of UA programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Agriculture and Sustainable Urban Development Planning)
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