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Sustainable Transportation Planning and Policy

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 11740

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Guest Editor
Urban and Regional Studies and Planning Program, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
Interests: urban planning; transportation planning and modeling; geographic information systems; sustainability; public policy and administration
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Due to the Age Wave, we have experienced a fast growth of the number of senior citizens in the past few decades. This situation has also been compounded by the existence of a large number of individuals with disabilities and individuals with low income. The transportation-disadvantaged population is bound to increase in the U.S., China, and around the world. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated that in 2010, there were about 40 million Americans aged 65 years and over and about 46 million Americans in poverty. 

The transportation-disadvantaged population typically cannot drive or do not have access to private automobiles and also have different degrees of difficulty when using public transportation. However, travel is essential to maintain these people’s living independence. Therefore, the transportation-disadvantaged population require more human service transportation or specialized transportation, which include a broad range of transportation service options such as dial-a-ride paratransit, the use of bus tokens and/or transit passes for fixed-route scheduled services, access to taxi vouchers and/or mileage reimbursement for volunteers or program participants, and many others. This particular population also need an integrated set of public policies and planning measures to accommodate their special mobility requirements. 

This Special Issue will include a collection of high-quality papers on specific and comparative research on policies, laws and regulations, planning, management, operations, and financing associated with sustainable transportation planning and policy for seniors, individuals with disabilities, and individuals with low income. In addition, papers examining financing mechanisms, social security, senior-friendly neighborhood and community planning, and impacts of the recent coronavirus epidemic on senior transportation and well-being,  as well as sustainable transportation planning and policy in general will be particularly welcomed. 

All submissions must be original and not be under review by any other journals. For Instructions for Authors and manuscript submission guidelines, please check: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability/instructions

Since this Special Issue is planned to be published in May 2021, please submit your manuscripts by January 31, 2021. 

To submit your manuscript, register and log in to the submission website: https://susy.mdpi.com/

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of the guest editors:

Xueming (Jimmy) Chen, [email protected]

Prof. Dr. Xueming (Jimmy) Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Transportation-disadvantaged population
  • Specialized and human service transportation
  • Senior transportation planning and policy
  • Coronavirus impacts
  • Financing and social security
  • Sustainable transportation planning and policy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 329 KiB  
Article
Electrifying Tourist Mobility in Bali, Indonesia: Setting the Target and Estimating the CO2 Reduction Based on Stated Choice Experiment
by Muhamad Rizki, Jeanly Syahputri, Prawira Fajarindra Belgiawan and Muhammad Zudhy Irawan
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11656; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111656 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2903
Abstract
The Bali Government has made the implementation of the electric vehicle (EV) policy a high priority considering its attractiveness for emission and air pollution reduction to maintain the sustainability of Bali’s nature and tourism sector. Considering the uniqueness of the tourism sector in [...] Read more.
The Bali Government has made the implementation of the electric vehicle (EV) policy a high priority considering its attractiveness for emission and air pollution reduction to maintain the sustainability of Bali’s nature and tourism sector. Considering the uniqueness of the tourism sector in Bali and the mobility it generates, this study aims to investigate the factors that influence EV use by tourists based on several scenarios for estimating EV share target and the emission reduction contributed. For those purposes, the stated choice questionnaire was distributed online and offline to tourists in Bali and analyzed using the multinomial logit (MNL) model. While the study done during pandemic times, where the number of the tourist is significantly decreasing and the travel behavior influenced by mobility restriction imposed by the government, the data collection still covered mobility of both international and domestic tourist. The survey found that rental cost and accessibility, as well as the quality of charging stations are factors that affect EV use by tourists. Motorcycle parking cost was also found to influence EV use. These findings align with previous studies, and interventions such as fiscal incentives for rental companies and infrastructure development are suggested similar to EV incentives implemented in China, India, or the US. The development of the low emission zone (LEZ) is also proposed to manage parking fares similar to what was implemented in London, specifically to push the shift from internal combustion engine (ICE) to EV. Based on emission inventory calculation, 1.9 million kg of potential annual CO2 can be prevented with the implementation of these policies by the government. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation Planning and Policy)
18 pages, 3045 KiB  
Article
Measuring the Urban Forms of Shanghai’s City Center and Its New Districts: A Neighborhood-Level Comparative Analysis
by Lin Lin, Xueming (Jimmy) Chen and Anne Vernez Moudon
Sustainability 2021, 13(15), 8481; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13158481 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 2875
Abstract
Rapid urban expansion has radically transformed the city centers and the new districts of Chinese cities. Both areas have undergone unique redevelopment and development over the past decades, generating unique urban forms worthy of study. To date, few studies have investigated development patterns [...] Read more.
Rapid urban expansion has radically transformed the city centers and the new districts of Chinese cities. Both areas have undergone unique redevelopment and development over the past decades, generating unique urban forms worthy of study. To date, few studies have investigated development patterns and land use intensities at the neighborhood level. The present study aims to fill the gap and compare the densities of different types of developments and the spatial compositions of different commercial uses at the neighborhood level. We captured the attributes of their built environment that support instrumental activities of daily living of 710 neighborhoods centered on the public elementary schools of the entire Shanghai municipality using application programming interfaces provided in Baidu Map services. The 200 m neighborhood provided the best fit to capture the variations of the built environment. Overall, city center neighborhoods had significantly higher residential densities and housed more daily routine destinations than their counterparts in the new districts. Unexpectedly, however, the total length of streets was considerably smaller in city-center neighborhoods, likely reflecting the prominence of the wide multilane vehicular roads surrounding large center city redevelopment projects. The findings point to convergence between the city center’s urban forms and that of the new districts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation Planning and Policy)
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17 pages, 9774 KiB  
Article
Identifying the Daily Activity Spaces of Older Adults Living in a High-Density Urban Area: A Study Using the Smartphone-Based Global Positioning System Trajectory in Shanghai
by Jiatian Bu, Jie Yin, Yifan Yu and Ye Zhan
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5003; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095003 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2486
Abstract
The characteristics of the built environment and the configuration of public facilities can affect the health and well-being of older adults. Recognizing the range of daily activities and understanding the utilization of public facilities among older adults has become essential in planning age-friendly [...] Read more.
The characteristics of the built environment and the configuration of public facilities can affect the health and well-being of older adults. Recognizing the range of daily activities and understanding the utilization of public facilities among older adults has become essential in planning age-friendly communities. However, traditional methods are unable to provide large-scale objective measures of older adults’ travel behaviors. To address this issue, we used the smartphone-based global positioning system (GPS) trajectory to explore the activity spaces of 76 older adults in a high-density urban community in Shanghai for 102 consecutive days. We found that activity spaces are centered around older adults’ living communities, with 46.3% within a 1.5 km distance. The older adults’ daily activities are within a 15 min walking distance, and accessibility is the most important factor when making a travel choice to parks and public facilities. We also found that the travel range and spatial distribution of points of interest are different between age and gender groups. In addition, we found that using a concave hull with Alpha shape algorithm is more applicable and robust than the traditional convex hull algorithm. This is a unique case study in a high-density urban area with objective measures for assessing the activity spaces of older adults, thus providing empirical evidence for promoting healthy aging in cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation Planning and Policy)
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13 pages, 4378 KiB  
Article
Transport for the Elderly: Activity Patterns, Mode Choices, and Spatiotemporal Constraints
by Yang Zhou, Quan Yuan and Chao Yang
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10024; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310024 - 1 Dec 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2366
Abstract
The rapid aging of the population has posed significant challenges to society and raised new demand for transportation services. Understanding travel needs of the elderly is crucial to making effective strategies for accommodating their demand in many newly motorized cities in developing countries [...] Read more.
The rapid aging of the population has posed significant challenges to society and raised new demand for transportation services. Understanding travel needs of the elderly is crucial to making effective strategies for accommodating their demand in many newly motorized cities in developing countries such as China. Using a Markov-chain-based mixture model, we identify two main activity patterns of the elderly: recreation-shopping-oriented (RS-oriented) pattern and schooling-drop-off/pick-up-oriented (SDP-oriented) pattern. Elderly people in the RS-oriented pattern enjoy a cozy life with much time spent on recreation and shopping activities, while those in the SDP-oriented pattern take responsibility of sending grandchildren to school and taking them back home. The RS-oriented elderly people are faced with spatial constraints to access the sparsely distributed recreational sights; however, the SDP-oriented group is subject to temporal constraints when making daily trips. These results would encourage policy makers to reconsider the role of transportation in aged people’s lives and better accommodate their demand through designing safer walking and cycling environment and improving the quality of transit services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Transportation Planning and Policy)
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