Special Issue "Sustainable Economy for the Common Good"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vanessa Campos-Climent
Website
Guest Editor
Business Administration Dept., Universitat de València, Chair in Economy for the Common Good, València, Spain
Interests: economy for the common good; corporate sustainability; sustainability strategy; sustainable entrepreneurship; social businesses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise papers covering a wide range of aspects related to the Economy for the Common Good (ECG) as a framework to operationalize sustainability in the business context.

Sustainability and corporate sustainability are topics that have gained lots of attention in the business sphere. The debate has moved from corporate social responsibility to corporate sustainability. Consequently, there is a growing interest in management frameworks that allow us to integrate and monitor corporate sustainability into the business strategy.

Likewise, the 2030 agenda set by the United Nations (UN) advocates for the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the corporate level following a multistakeholder approach. Some sustainability frameworks (e.g., SDG Compass, among others) have demonstrated its usability and effectiveness in large businesses. However, their applicability to micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) is under scrutiny. Therefore, the availability of sustainability frameworks suitable for MSMEs, such as the ECG, may be crucial to the successful implementation of the SDGs in most firms.

Thus, papers addressing the contribution of the ECG framework to the integration of sustainability and, SDGs into the business strategy from an empirical point of view are especially welcome. Papers selected for this issue may also address theoretical and methodological developments.

Dr. Vanessa Campos-Climent
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • economy for the common good
  • SDGs
  • sustainability strategy
  • sustainability management
  • sustainability framework
  • sustainable supply chain
  • sustainable businesses
  • sustainable innovation
  • MSMEs
  • multistakeholder

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
High-Commitment Work Practices and the Social Responsibility Issue: Interaction and Benefits
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020459 - 06 Jan 2021
Abstract
Human Resource Management (HRM) has a potentially vital role to play in addressing the new challenges that companies have to face and in delivering initiatives in the framework of corporate sustainability. Our work attempts to shed light on the strategic role of High-Commitment [...] Read more.
Human Resource Management (HRM) has a potentially vital role to play in addressing the new challenges that companies have to face and in delivering initiatives in the framework of corporate sustainability. Our work attempts to shed light on the strategic role of High-Commitment Work Practices (HCWP) as a Corporate Sustainability (CS) partner and, more specifically, to analyze the implications of their integration on the competitiveness of the firm. With this purpose, we apply a qualitative methodology, using a single case study, to explore and explain why and how the interaction between HCWP and CS takes place. The results show how this interaction encourages the formulation and implementation of new socially responsible organizational initiatives that help the firm to improve its competitive position in the market through the development of employees’ innovative behavior. HCWP integrate with CS initiatives when CS values form part of the mission and strategy of the firm. Also, HCWP support CS deployment, primarily in its internal dimension. In addition, our work reveals that cultural factors such as organizational values and management style, and structural factors like empowerment and teamwork must be jointly considered when adopting a CS strategy aimed at developing innovative behavior and competitive advantage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Economy for the Common Good)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Economy for the Common Good Measurement Theory Ability to Integrate the SDGs into MSMEs
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10305; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410305 - 10 Dec 2020
Abstract
Over the past decades, sustainability and corporate sustainability have gained a lot of attention. Currently, the focus of attention has shifted to the integration of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into businesses operation. The extant literature points to the proposed frameworks as not [...] Read more.
Over the past decades, sustainability and corporate sustainability have gained a lot of attention. Currently, the focus of attention has shifted to the integration of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into businesses operation. The extant literature points to the proposed frameworks as not fitting micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSME) reality and, also, to a lack of empirical evidence in this field. With research at the intersection of business and SDGs still being scarce, the Economy for the Common Good (ECG) model allows operationalizing the SDGs employing its novel measurement theory. The present study is aimed at completing the statistical validation process of the ECG measurement theory using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on a sample of 206 European firms. Thus, after having performed an exploratory factor analysis (EFA), this study takes as a starting point the previously published knowledge and proceeds with the second step of the statistical validation process. The results of CFA confirm the conclusions of the EFA and allow to redefine the measurement scales included in the ECG framework to achieve a sufficient level of goodness of fit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Economy for the Common Good)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Alliances between For-Profit and Non-Profit Organizations as an Instrument to Implement the Economy for the Common Good
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9511; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229511 - 15 Nov 2020
Abstract
The model of the Economy for the Common Good (ECG) has cooperation as one of its main principles. This alternative economic model proposes to prioritize cooperation over competition to favor the creation of social value. From this point of view, strategic alliances between [...] Read more.
The model of the Economy for the Common Good (ECG) has cooperation as one of its main principles. This alternative economic model proposes to prioritize cooperation over competition to favor the creation of social value. From this point of view, strategic alliances between organizations can be used as an instrument that supports implementation of the ECG model. In recent years, alliances between for-profit and non-profit entities have been strengthened as a method to facilitate actions focused on social responsibility and sustainability. Moreover, the ECG model has become an adequate management framework for corporate sustainability. This work aims to connect alliances between for-profit and non-profit organizations with the ECG model. First, this connection is manifested in a theoretical way. This paper is going to analyze how such alliances can contribute to increasing the values of the ECG model: human dignity, solidarity and social justice, environmental sustainability, and transparency and codetermination. Afterwards, this work analyzes two cases of this type of alliance—Grupo Vips-Fundación Hazlo Posible and Danone Foods-Grameen Bank—to determine the benefits that this type of cooperation can provide to society. We study their motives and the benefits that they bring to the organizations and the community. Therefore, this work assesses how these types of alliances influence the different topics included in the Common Good Matrix. Moreover, we conduct a comparative analysis between both cases. This work demonstrates that, by implementing this type of strategic alliances, the creation of social value is favored, thus contributing to implementation of the ECG model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Economy for the Common Good)
Open AccessArticle
Do Stakeholders Modulate Philanthropic Strategy? Corporate Philanthropy as Stakeholders’ Engagement
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7242; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187242 - 04 Sep 2020
Abstract
Corporate philanthropy, as an expression of commitment to the common good, can contribute to the creation of social value in companies. This corporate philanthropy can be managed in various ways. The choice of how to channel corporate philanthropy could be, in accordance with [...] Read more.
Corporate philanthropy, as an expression of commitment to the common good, can contribute to the creation of social value in companies. This corporate philanthropy can be managed in various ways. The choice of how to channel corporate philanthropy could be, in accordance with stakeholder theory, the result of companies’ interactions with key stakeholders and, in accordance with the theory of signaling, a signal that companies use to respond to their demands. This approach contributes to the literature on bottom-up initiatives (stakeholder–managers) as opposed to top-down strategies (board–stakeholders) in relation to corporate social responsibility, which is becoming increasingly important in a society where networks of communication, cooperation and interaction are established. To this end, a study was conducted on 221 European companies indexed in the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices in the year 2018. The findings have several practical implications: The management of corporate philanthropy should take into account the stakeholders’ requirements, and stakeholders show greater affinity and trust with the company when philanthropy is channeled through foundations. By contrast, donations are not associated with stakeholder attitudes. As a theoretical implication, this paper supports the theories of stakeholders and signaling by explaining the role of philanthropy in the relationship with stakeholders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Economy for the Common Good)
Open AccessArticle
Covid-19 and the Search for the Common Good: The Case of Parmon Spa (Italy)
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6657; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166657 - 18 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The Covid-19 pandemic marks an extraordinary global crisis unseen in this last century, with its rapid spread worldwide and associated mortality burden, which is leading to profound economic consequences. In such an unprecedented scenario, most firms were not ready to deal with the [...] Read more.
The Covid-19 pandemic marks an extraordinary global crisis unseen in this last century, with its rapid spread worldwide and associated mortality burden, which is leading to profound economic consequences. In such an unprecedented scenario, most firms were not ready to deal with the resulting significant large-scale perturbations. Challenges for firms in the sector of the production of essential medical devices were among the most urgent. This study aims to investigate the behavior of a medium-size Italian enterprise that during this crisis, by converting part of its production line to the production of masks, undertook a path characterized by an ethics mindset, showing how its potentialities can also be used for the aim of common good. The case study is also presented to demonstrate that leadership ethical values and constant connection to the entrepreneurial ecosystem, maintaining a positive culture therein, have contributed toward a common good choice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Economy for the Common Good)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop