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Special Issue "Sustainability in Sensory Analysis and New Food Product Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Food".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 4812

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Attila Gere
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Science, Institute of Food Technology, Department of Postharvest Science, Trade and Sensory Evaluation, Szent István University, H-1118 Budapest, Hungary
Interests: eye-tracking; sensometrics; sensory analysis; virtual reality; chemometrics; consumer sensory analysis; food product development; sensometrics; entomophagy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past decades, sustainability gained more and more space in food sciences and therefore in food sensory analysis and product development, too. In order to feed the ever-growing population of planet Earth, not only new food ingredients must be developed but new, greener food technologies, raw materials, sensory testing methods and deeper understanding of consumer minds regarding innovations are needed. There are several promising research directions including cultured meats, insects as food, plant-based protein sources, minimal processing technologies, food waste reduction, new sensory methods suitable for testing children’s food preferences, rapid sensory methods, and consumer attitude evaluations, all pointing to the global aim of preserving Earth’s resources while providing quality food for the population.

This Special Issue will comprise a selection of papers presenting original and innovative contributions to the sustainability in sensory analysis and new food product development in areas related to new food ingredients, greener food technologies, raw materials, sensory testing methods and deeper understanding of consumer minds regarding innovations in food sciences that will contribute to a more sustainable future of food industry. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer-review process with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Attila Gere
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • new food ingredients
  • greener food technologies
  • new raw materials
  • sensory testing methods
  • understanding of consumer minds

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Use of Preference Analysis to Identify Early Adopter Mind-Sets of Insect-Based Food Products
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1435; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031435 - 26 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 770
Abstract
Insects may potentially provide an alternative protein source. However, consumers may not easily accept insects due to feelings of disgust. Therefore, identifying early adopters of insect-based food products may determine their future acceptance. This study was conducted to (1) identify early adopter Mind-Sets [...] Read more.
Insects may potentially provide an alternative protein source. However, consumers may not easily accept insects due to feelings of disgust. Therefore, identifying early adopters of insect-based food products may determine their future acceptance. This study was conducted to (1) identify early adopter Mind-Sets of insect-based food products, (2) determine product features early adopters would prefer in an insect-based food product, and (3) determine differences in Mind-Sets in different countries. Two studies were distributed online in the US and the Philippines. The first study included information about insects, while the second study had no information on insects. The experimental design included elements, or product features, regarding insect-based products that participants evaluated. Preference Analysis was used to segment the participants into Mind-Sets. Based on the results, participants neither liked nor disliked the elements used. Participants in the studies without insect information were found to have higher liking when comparing liking. Participants who were aware of the study being about insects may have had less interest when evaluating the elements, as the response times between the US studies were significantly different (p < 0.05). The role of information and segmentation of the participants demonstrates the importance of experimental design when using Preference Analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Sensory Analysis and New Food Product Development)
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Article
Utilization of Carrot Pomace to Grow Mealworm Larvae (Tenebrio molitor)
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9341; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169341 - 20 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 773
Abstract
Edible insects are a sustainable food source to help feed the growing population. Mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) can survive on a variety of food wastes and alter their composition based on the feed source. Commercial carrot production produces an abundance of carotenoid-rich [...] Read more.
Edible insects are a sustainable food source to help feed the growing population. Mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) can survive on a variety of food wastes and alter their composition based on the feed source. Commercial carrot production produces an abundance of carotenoid-rich carrot pomace, which may be beneficial for mealworm larvae growth. This study uses an I-optimal response surface design to assess the effect of dehydrated carrot pomace concentrations (made up with wheat bran as the control) in the substrate and wet carrot pomace as the moisture source (potato and carrot as control moisture sources) in a mealworm-larvae-growing system. Using this design, statistical models were fit to determine the relationship between the substrate and moisture and dependent variables, which include mealworm larvae mortality, days to maturity, weight, protein content, fat content, moisture content, ash content, and total carotenoid content. An optimum diet was proposed, in which the best diet for improving commercial mealworm growth was found to contain 36% dehydrated carrot pomace in the substrate, with wet carrot pomace as the moisture source. This research provides an application for a commercial waste stream and provides insight to help improve the growth of a sustainable protein source. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Sensory Analysis and New Food Product Development)
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Article
Development of a Novel Gluten-Free Egg Pie Product: Effects of Sensory Attributes and Storage
Sustainability 2020, 12(24), 10389; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122410389 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
In the last few decades, convenience has become one of the most important factors for consumers. Therefore, food products that take a short time to prepare are gaining in popularity. The aim of this study was to develop a gluten-free egg-pie product which [...] Read more.
In the last few decades, convenience has become one of the most important factors for consumers. Therefore, food products that take a short time to prepare are gaining in popularity. The aim of this study was to develop a gluten-free egg-pie product which is quick-frozen in pre-baked form and remains usable for a long time. Besides, it satisfies various consumer needs while remaining sustainable by not having a great impact on the environment. A dough containing rice, millet, and buckwheat flour was developed. The fillings also appeared in unflavored and flavored form (spinach onion, cheese) with and without increased egg white content. Acceptance of the product was measured by sensory test. Texture and dry matter content measurement, triangular test, and color measurement were performed to track changes through six months of frozen storage. The stored pies’ hardness declined for three months, then doubled the original value at the end of the frozen storage. The stored pies hardness declined for three months (from 10.76 ± 1.78 and 11.22 ± 1.47 N to 8.52 ± 1.74 and 9.91 ± 1.16 N), then doubled the original value at the end of the frozen storage (21.69 ± 2.55 and 19.62 ± 1.67 N). The dry matter content showed increasing tendency. Results of the triangular tests showed that the stored flavored pies were less distinguishable from freshly baked ones than the unflavored egg-pies. Color measurement showed that the fillings of the pies were darkening during the frozen storage. Consumer liking test showed values between 6.52 ± 1.76 and 7.56 ± 1.2 on a 9-point hedonic scale. Color measurement showed that the fillings of the pies were darkening during the frozen storage, and the lightness values decreased from 90.17 ± 0.06 and 90.53 ± 0.11 to 81.43 ± 0.41 and 83.22 ± 0.87 in six months. Results generated in this study suggest that consumers’ acceptance was high, though results of penalty analysis showed that more flavorings would increase the overall acceptability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Sensory Analysis and New Food Product Development)
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Article
Creating a Mind Genomics Wiki for Non-Meat Analogs
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5352; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135352 - 02 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1342
Abstract
In the past few decades, several negative aspects of excess meat consumption have been identified, ranging broadly from health to environment to consumer rejections of meat analogs. At the same time, however, several new meat alternatives have emerged such as algae, insects, and [...] Read more.
In the past few decades, several negative aspects of excess meat consumption have been identified, ranging broadly from health to environment to consumer rejections of meat analogs. At the same time, however, several new meat alternatives have emerged such as algae, insects, and cultured meat, which all present a sustainable option to reduce meat consumption. The paper assesses the psychology of the “everyday” for meat-free products, focusing on how consumers in two specific markets in the USA (California, New York) respond to messages about four specific topics involving meat-free products. These four are sensory characteristics, possible usage in products, health aspects, and environmental aspects, respectively. Each study with 100 or more respondents used experimental design of messages (Mind Genomics) to understand the degree to which the respondents reacted positively or negatively to the 16 messages in each of the four studies. The data suggest that focusing on the Total Panel or on geography, gender, or age will not reveal the dramatically different mind-sets existing in each of the four topics. We introduce the notion of the PVI, personal viewpoint identifier, to help the researcher uncover these mind-sets, and help communicate effectively with each mind-set about meat analogs or help recruit these individuals to participate in further studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Sensory Analysis and New Food Product Development)
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