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Special Issue "RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 5777

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Thrassyvoulos Manios
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Hellenic Mediterranean University, 71410 Heraklion, Greece
Interests: sustainable management of waste and natural resources
Prof. Dr. Katia Lasaridi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Geography and Applied Economics, Department of Geography Harokopio University, 176 71 Athens, Greece
Interests: sustainable management of waste and natural resources
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ioannis N. Daliakopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Hellenic Mediterranean University, 71410 Heraklion, Greece
Interests: sustainable management of waste and natural resources
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Christina Chroni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Geography and Applied Economics, Department of Geography Harokopio University, 176 71 Athens, Greece
Interests: sustainable management of waste and natural resources

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global food chain system is the single largest source of greenhouse gasses in the world, and the largest cause of biodiversity loss, terrestrial ecosystem destruction, freshwater consumption, and waterway pollution due to the mismanagement of biocides and nutrients. On top of these deficiencies, approximately 40% of all produced food is wasted throughout the farm to fork processes, while more than 900 million people remain undernourished.

Thus, the margin for improvement of the global food chain system is huge and may unlock pathways towards the stability of the Earth system and the future of humanity. Against this background, the RETASTE Conference has initiated a dialogue on innovative solutions and optimization schemes that exploit significant opportunities for food waste reduction, reuse, and recycling at all stages of the food life cycle, as well as their scalability and commercial translatability. In parallel, RETASTE aims to address the social aspects of food waste issues, as well as to highlight ways to tackle social and perception barriers against reducing our environmental footprint, thus shifting the evolving future of social, market, and global megatrends.

Through the conservation of resources, the strengthening of the social fabric, and the development of new value chains, RETASTE supports the implementation of the Circular Economy concept. This Special Issue presents contributions from the RETASTE Conference.

Join us to Rethink Food Waste!

Prof. Dr. Thrassyvoulos Manios
Prof. Dr. Katia Lasaridi
Dr. Ioannis N. Daliakopoulos
Dr. Christina Chroni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food waste
  • circular economy
  • prevention
  • valorization
  • utilization
  • reclamation

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Autonomous Home Composting Units for Urban Areas in Greece: The Case Study of the Municipality of Rhodes
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12362; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912362 - 28 Sep 2022
Viewed by 209
Abstract
A significant issue is reducing the amount of biological waste that is disposed of in landfills, particularly in high-density residential areas. The Wastes Framework Directive (98/2008), in particular, sets forward the legal requirements for source separation in the European Union’s (EU) environmental legislation. [...] Read more.
A significant issue is reducing the amount of biological waste that is disposed of in landfills, particularly in high-density residential areas. The Wastes Framework Directive (98/2008), in particular, sets forward the legal requirements for source separation in the European Union’s (EU) environmental legislation. The directive sets a target for separate collection of 10% of the organic waste produced in each municipality by 2030, especially with regard to organic waste. The pilot experience of an integrated biowaste management system that supports source separation and urban composting in an Autonomous Composting Unit (ACU) was presented in this study. The Municipality of Rhodes installed five ACUs in various locations. Used food and green waste are the two types of waste that are deposited in the ACUs. The development of a system for the collection of produced biowaste and its treatment at the source, without producing a nuisance, within an urban area, is the goal of this innovation. Since landfilling of mixed municipal solid waste has long been a common practice on the island of Rhodes, as well as in many other locations of insular and mainland Greece, this technique was introduced as a novel implementation and innovation for the region. The results showed that biowaste source separation was successfully carried out by citizens, resulting in high-purity feed. All ACUs produce compost that is of a standard quality. In accordance with the principles of the circular economy, this study showed that ACUs are a sustainable solution for taking a closed unit approach to the biowaste management problem in urban areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
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Article
Μeat Quality Traits as Affected by the Dietary Inclusion of Food Waste in Finishing Pigs
Sustainability 2022, 14(11), 6593; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116593 - 27 May 2022
Viewed by 469
Abstract
An increasing world population along with increasing human needs have raised demand for animal origin products. Moreover, high prices of conventional animal feeds have led to a demand for alternative feedstuff. Food waste can be an alternative feed ingredient. The aim of the [...] Read more.
An increasing world population along with increasing human needs have raised demand for animal origin products. Moreover, high prices of conventional animal feeds have led to a demand for alternative feedstuff. Food waste can be an alternative feed ingredient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dietary inclusion of dried hotel residues (DHR) on the growth performance, blood biochemical parameters and meat quality traits in finishing pigs. In each of the 2 trials conducted, 20 castrated male pigs were allotted into 2 treatments. In both trials, control treatment pigs were fed a corn-soybean meal-based diet without hotel residues. In the first trial, a DHR1 treatment contained 100 g DHR1/kg with meat residues (approximately 5%). In the second trial, a DHR2 treatment, contained 80 g DHR2/kg with no meat residues. Average daily feed intake tended to be lower and average daily weight gain was lower in DHR1 compared to control pigs in the first trial, while in the second no differences were detected. However, final body weight, FCR and dressing percentage were not affected in any of the two trials. Minor differences in several meat physical traits, hematological parameters were observed among treatments and trials. In conclusion, the results indicate that the dietary addition of DHR did not affect the feed utilization and the quality of the produced meat; hence, the use of DHR in pig feeding can be supported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
Article
Investigating the Impacts of Behavioural-Change Interventions and COVID-19 on the Food-Waste-Generation Behaviours of Catered Students in the UK and India
Sustainability 2022, 14(9), 5486; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14095486 - 03 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 578
Abstract
A food-waste initiative was conducted at two university canteens in the UK and India to examine food-waste attitudes and opportunities for food-waste reduction. Interventions were carried out to reduce food waste in both canteens. In the Indian canteen, postintervention data also included COVID-19-related [...] Read more.
A food-waste initiative was conducted at two university canteens in the UK and India to examine food-waste attitudes and opportunities for food-waste reduction. Interventions were carried out to reduce food waste in both canteens. In the Indian canteen, postintervention data also included COVID-19-related changes, such as a change from self-service to table service, as well as reduced menu choices and an improved estimation of the number of students requiring meals. Surveys and focus groups were conducted with students to better understand their food-waste-related attitudes, while interviews were carried out with university staff to better understand food-waste management. The study in the UK university canteen found that introducing table cards, posters, and signs led to food-waste reductions of 13%. Meanwhile, the study in the Indian university canteen found that the interventions and COVID-19 impacts led to food-waste reductions of 50%. Concerning food-waste-related differences between the UK and India, culture and food preferences were key reasons for food waste in India, with 40.5% more participants in India stating that they wasted food because the ‘food didn’t taste good’. Students in India were more concerned about social issues and food poverty related to food waste, with around 9% more participants stating that the ‘food could be used by others’. Meanwhile, students in the UK were more bothered by the economic and environmental impacts of food waste, with around 31% more participants stating food waste is ‘a waste of money’, and is ‘bad for the environment’ when compared to India. Key opportunities for both countries included adopting food-sharing initiatives, informed menu choices, and meal planning, as well as student-led engagement projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
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Article
The Food for Feed Concept: Redefining the Use of Hotel Food Residues in Broiler Diets
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3659; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063659 - 21 Mar 2022
Viewed by 645
Abstract
The large quantities of food waste that are generated every year have raised management concerns. Animal diets might be a feasible strategy for utilizing food waste and partially replacing commercially available feedstuffs. The present study examined the potential use of food waste originating [...] Read more.
The large quantities of food waste that are generated every year have raised management concerns. Animal diets might be a feasible strategy for utilizing food waste and partially replacing commercially available feedstuffs. The present study examined the potential use of food waste originating from hotels for broiler chickens’ diets. Two hundred and forty (240) one-day-old broilers were allocated into four treatment groups, namely, control (C), non-meat treatment (NM), non-sterilized treatment (NS) and sterilized treatment (S), each with 5 replicate pens of 12 broilers. The experimental period lasted 42 days. Several parameters were recorded throughout the experiment, such as the initial and final body weight, the feed conversion ratio (FCR), the traits, some biochemical and hematological parameters, the weight of internal organs and selected breast meat quality indices. The results showed no major differences in health parameters and the carcass quality traits. There was also no difference in growth rate between the three groups (C, NS, S), but broilers fed the NM diet (without meat remnants) had a significantly lower growth rate by 11.4% compared to the control. Food waste residues can be an alternative feedstuff for broiler chickens and can maintain performance at acceptable levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
Article
The “A2UFood Training Kit”: Participatory Workshops to Minimize Food Loss and Waste
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2446; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042446 - 21 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 705
Abstract
The A2UFood project aspires to design and implement a holistic scheme for the management of food loss and waste, covering all aspects of the ‘reduce–reuse–recycle’ philosophy. An integral part of an efficient strategy to combat food wastage is raising awareness and informing the [...] Read more.
The A2UFood project aspires to design and implement a holistic scheme for the management of food loss and waste, covering all aspects of the ‘reduce–reuse–recycle’ philosophy. An integral part of an efficient strategy to combat food wastage is raising awareness and informing the public. For this reason, among the designed direct, in person, communication activities of the A2UFood project, the ‘A2Food training kit’ has a key role. The kit includes a short theoretical background and nine sets of participatory activities, and it is the first of its kind implemented in Greece. After their evaluation through workshops, all proposed activities were included in an e-book for further use. Activities are based on the Education for Sustainable Development framework and the Sustainable Development Goals. The dissemination model employed draws on adult education theory, in the form of participatory workshops and also follows the ‘train the trainers’ principle. All the workshops are based on the principles of active learning, related to real life experience and cooperative learning. Following these principles, the activities designed for the workshops aimed to bring participants’ pre-existing experience, values, and beliefs into confrontation with a new context. Responding to COVID-19 pandemic limitations, necessary adjustments to distant training requirements were also implemented. Through the training kit, we have trained 270 trainers and, by the end of June 2021, 19 of them had implemented selected workshops for about 600 students, all over Greece. In conclusion, the multiplicative power of the kit is considered satisfactory under the given pandemic-induced social-distancing conditions, and it will have a lasting footprint alongside the informative campaign, since it will be available for use in the future, either as a tool for the training of trainers, or as material to be used by the trainers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
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Article
Valorization of the Olive Oil Production Residue: Healthy Ingredient for Developing High Value-Added Spread
Sustainability 2021, 13(24), 13984; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132413984 - 17 Dec 2021
Viewed by 682
Abstract
This study focused on the development of a new olive-based product enriched with proteins, antioxidant compounds and functional properties, aiming at valorization of the olive residue from the typical olive oil extraction process. Olive oil was extracted using a patented cold pressing machine, [...] Read more.
This study focused on the development of a new olive-based product enriched with proteins, antioxidant compounds and functional properties, aiming at valorization of the olive residue from the typical olive oil extraction process. Olive oil was extracted using a patented cold pressing machine, resulting in a valuable source of bioactive compounds in the form of olive residue (pulp ~70%, pit- and skin-free). Conventional (solid: water ratio 1:4, 25 °C, 2 h) and HP-assisted (200 MPa, solid:water ratio 1/4, 10 min) de-bittering processes were carried out in order to remove oleuropein content (up to 50%) from olive residue, thus decreasing its bitter taste. The olive spread was prepared with olive residue (50%) and honey (25%), enriched with proteins (24.5%) from nuts. Quality parameters, nutritional attributes, microbiological analysis, phenolic compounds and oxidative stability as well as sensory evaluation of the olive spread were conducted during storage. Its shelf-life was estimated (prediction through accelerated tests) as 9.5 months when stored at 4 °C. The organoleptic evaluation showed that the proposed olive spread had a texture similar to peanut butter and could potentially be consumed as a health-promoting spread due to its high content of proteins (~10 g/100 g), crude fibers (>6 g/100 g) and essential fatty acids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
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Article
Investigations on the Use of Dried Food Residues as a Potential Dietary Ingredient for Cats
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11603; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111603 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 642
Abstract
The potential use of food residues for pet food could significantly contribute to food waste reduction. In the present study, the effects of the inclusion of dried food residues (DFR) (0, 5, 10 and 15%) in a complete diet were evaluated in seven [...] Read more.
The potential use of food residues for pet food could significantly contribute to food waste reduction. In the present study, the effects of the inclusion of dried food residues (DFR) (0, 5, 10 and 15%) in a complete diet were evaluated in seven healthy adult cats. At the end of each three-week feeding period, feces were collected. The analysis of the fecal microbiota by 16S rDNA sequencing demonstrated a marked increase of the bacterial alpha-diversity with increasing dietary inclusion levels of DFR. In addition, an increase in the relative abundance of Coriobacteriales, Collinsella and Lachnoclostridum, as well as of propionate and n-valerate in the feces of the cats, was detected. The dietary inclusion of DFR decreased the apparent crude protein digestibility and tended to decrease the apparent crude fat digestibility. Overall, the DFR seemed to be highly fermentable in the intestine of cats, which markedly affected the diversity of the fecal microbiota. As this effect might be critical for a balanced gut microbiota, but also along with the observed depressing effects of DFR on the apparent crude protein and crude fat digestibility, lower inclusion levels are recommended if used as a potential ingredient for cat food in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RETASTE: Rethink Food Waste)
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