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Special Issue "Nearly Zero Energy Buildings and their Viability under current and Future Climate Conditions"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ali Bahadori Jahromi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor in Civil Engineering, University Of West London, UK
Interests: building simulation; building energy efficiency; climate change; sustainable engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Fourth Assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has declared that 30 percent of anticipated emissions (within the building sector) can be prevented by 2030 with economic benefits.

Whilst the recast Energy Performance Building Directive (EPBD) has mandated that all new buildings should be nearly zero-energy buildings (NZEBs) by 2020, including buildings that will undergo refurbishment/ renovations, the interpretation of how this will be implemented has been left for member states to decide. This open interpretation includes what is a NZEB, how to achieve this, how much energy input and output exactly is ‘nearly zero’ (i.e. the standard of ‘nearly zero’).

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect and present innovative research results, advancements and established methodologies directed towards the improvement of building performance, occupants’ thermal comfort of buildings and the reduction of building emissions. In this context, this Special Issue aims at collecting contributions that include:

  • investigate the current practices for designing NZEBs
  • studies of how existing buildings can be retrofitted to achieve these standards, e.g. NZEBs
  • negative implication of energy-efficient measures
  • establish a method platform to discern an adequate design solution
  • consider the operationality of design solutions under current and future climate conditions
  • identify cost-optimal design solutions for building emissions
  • develop a framework to identify which energy-efficient measures (EEMs) and scenarios have the lowest life cycle costs (LCCs)
  • generate greater awareness within the built environment sector on the social, economic, and environmental importance of improving energy efficiency within buildings
  • enhance and support current knowledge on building simulation
  • Provide applicable knowledge and develop a framework that can contribute to the successful adoption of NZEBs or similar standards on a commercial and residential level
  • climate change and its implications for building design

References:

Lykartsis, A.; B-Jahromi, A.; and Mylona, A. (2018) Investigating risk of overheating for school buildings under extreme hot weather conditions, Advances in Energy Research, An International Journals,  Vol. 5, No. 4 (2018) 65-77. Techno-Press, ISSN: 2287-6316 (Print), 2287-6324 (Online)

Rotimi, Abdulazeez; Bahadori-Jahromi, Ali; Mylona, Anastasia; Godfrey, Paulina and Cook, Darren. (2018) Optimum Size Selection of CHP Retrofitting in Existing UK Hotel Building. Journal of Sustainability, Volume 10, Issue 6, 2044, June 2018. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10062044

Salem, R; Bahadori-Jahromi, A; Mylona, A; Godfrey, P and Cook, D. (2018) Retrofit of a UK residential property to achieve nearly zero energy building standard, Advances in Environmental Research, An International Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1 (2018) 13-28, Techno-Press, ISSN: 2234-1722 (Print), 2234-1730 (Online)

Salem, R; Bahadori-Jahromi, A; Mylona, A; Godfrey, P; Cook, D. 2018. Comparison and evaluation of the potential energy, carbon emissions, and financial impacts from the incorporation of CHP and CCHP systems in existing UK hotel buildings. Energies, Vol.11, No. 5: 1219, 2018,  EISSN 1996-1073 DOI:10.3390/en11051219

Rotimi, Abdulazeez; Bahadori-Jahromi, Ali; Mylona, Anastasia; Godfrey, Paulina; Cook, Darren. (2017) Estimation and Validation of Energy Consumption in UK Existing Hotel Building Using Dynamic Simulation Software. Journal of Sustainability, Volume 9, Issue 8, 1391, August 2017. doi:10.3390/su9081391

Rotimi, A., Bahadori-Jahromi, A., Mylona, A., Godfrey, P. and Cook, D. (2017) Impact of cavity extract fans on the thermal and energy performance of existing UK hotel. Journal of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering Sustainability. DOI:10.1680/jensu.17.00017

Lykartsis, A.; B-Jahromi, A.; and Mylona, A. (2017) Evaluation of thermal comfort and cooling loads for a multistory building, Advances in Energy Research, An International Journals,  Vol. 5, No. 1 (2017) 65-77. Techno-Press, ISSN: 2287-6316 (Print), 2287-6324 (Online) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12989/eri.2017.5.1.065

Bahadori-Jahromi, Ali; Rotimi, Abdulazeez; Mylona, Anastasia; Godfrey, Paulina; Cook, Darren. (2017) Impact of Window Films on the Overall Energy Consumption of Existing UK Hotel Buildings. Journal of Sustainability, Volume 9, Issue 5, 731-754, May 2017. doi:10.3390/su9050731

Amoako-Attah, Joseph and Bahadori-Jahromi, Ali (2016) Impact of different weather files on London detached residential building performance – deterministic, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis on CIBSE TM48 and CIBSE TM49 future weather variables using CIBSE TM52 as overheating criteria. Journal of Sustainability, Volume 8, Issue 11, Page 1194, 22nd November 2016; doi:10.3390/su8111194

Amoako-Attah, J. and B-Jahromi, A. (2015) Method-comparison analysis of dwellings temperatures in the UK. Institution of Civil Engineers Journal of Engineering Sustainability, Volume 168, Issue 1, February 2015.

Amoako-Attah, J. & B-Jahromi, A. (2014) Impact of Standard Construction Specification on Thermal Comfort in UK Dwellings. Advances in Environmental Research (AER): An International Journal of interdisciplinary research in environmental science, technology, and management 3(3); September 2014.

Dr. Ali Bahadori Jahromi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy Efficient Measures
  • Life Cycle Costs
  • Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings
  • Building Simulation
  • Building Performance

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Investigating the Potential Impact of Future Climate Change on UK Supermarket Building Performance
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010033 - 22 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1062
Abstract
The large-scale shifts in weather patterns and an unprecedented change in climate have given rise to the interest in how climate change will affect the carbon emissions of supermarkets. This study investigates the implications of future climatic conditions on the operation of supermarkets [...] Read more.
The large-scale shifts in weather patterns and an unprecedented change in climate have given rise to the interest in how climate change will affect the carbon emissions of supermarkets. This study investigates the implications of future climatic conditions on the operation of supermarkets in the UK. The investigation was conducted by performing a series of energy modelling simulations on a LIDL supermarket model in London, based on the UK Climate Projections (UKCP09) future weather years provided by the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE). Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were used to perform the experiment, and the baseline model was validated against the actual data. This investigation ascertains and quantifies the annual energy consumption, carbon emissions, and cooling and heating demand of the supermarket under different climatic projections, which further validate the scientific theory of annual temperature rise as a result of long-term climatic variation. The maximum percentage increase for the annual energy consumption for current and future weather data sets observed was 7.01 and 6.45 for the 2050s medium emissions scenario, (90th) percentile and high emissions scenario, (90th) percentile, respectively, and 11.05, 14.07, and 17.68 for the 2080s low emissions scenario, (90th) percentile, medium (90th) percentile and high emissions scenario (90th) percentile, respectively. A similar inclining trend in the case of annual CO2 emissions was observed where the peak increase percentage was 6.80 and 6.24 for the 2050s medium emissions scenario, (90th) percentile and high (90th) percentile, respectively and 10.84, 13.84, and 17.45 for the 2080s low emissions scenario, (90th) percentile, medium emissions scenario (90th) percentile and high emissions scenario (90th) percentile, respectively. The study also analyses the future heating and cooling demands of the three warmest months and three coldest months of the year, respectively, to determine future variance in their relative values. Full article
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Article
Impact of Adding Comfort Cooling Systems on the Energy Consumption and EPC Rating of an Existing UK Hotel
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2950; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072950 - 07 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 914
Abstract
In light of the recent launch of the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard and its expected impact on the commercial buildings sector, this study investigated the impact of adding cooling systems on the annual energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and energy performance certificate (EPC) [...] Read more.
In light of the recent launch of the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard and its expected impact on the commercial buildings sector, this study investigated the impact of adding cooling systems on the annual energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and energy performance certificate (EPC) rating of an existing UK hotel. Thermal Analysis Software (TAS) was used to conduct the study, and the baseline model was validated against the actual data. As is the current accepted procedure in EPC generating in the UK, the cooling set points of the guest rooms were set to 25 °C, resulting in a small increase in the annual energy consumption and emission rates, but not enough to change the energy performance certificate rating. Also, it was found that an improvement in energy consumption and energy performance certificate rating of the hotel would be achieved if the new systems replaced the existing heating systems in the guest rooms. Further simulations investigated more realistic situations, in which occupants may decide to keep their rooms at cooler temperatures. The results from this round of simulations showed considerable increase in the energy consumption and emissions of the building; however, these results would not be considered in the current approved procedure for EPC generating. Full article
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Article
Near Zero-Energy Buildings in Lebanon: The Use of Emerging Technologies and Passive Architecture
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2267; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062267 - 13 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1522
Abstract
Architecture always aims to find solutions for problems around the world. One of the major trends at present relates to energy consumption and climate change. Construction is responsible for 18% of CO2 emissions. However, continuing to use fuel as a main source [...] Read more.
Architecture always aims to find solutions for problems around the world. One of the major trends at present relates to energy consumption and climate change. Construction is responsible for 18% of CO2 emissions. However, continuing to use fuel as a main source of energy consumption for economic reasons, as it is the cheapest raw material and most easily available material for most of the Arab countries, results in a negative environmental impact on the quality of life in these countries. This paper investigates a new design concept and decision-supporting tools for zero-energy buildings. Based on critical thinking as a new mechanism to create a hierarchy of designing a building, the research presents the experience of the author in teaching architecture courses for postgraduates for five years (ARCH 662: Architecture Design and Decision-Supporting Tools and Arch 663: Advanced Sustainable Architecture). The result of this research could be new methodologies that help and guide the architect in creating more zero-energy buildings in their countries. In addition, the spread of knowledge in the future generation of architects in architecture schools will mean that new designers believe in protecting and taking care of their environment, which will increase awareness of environmental issues and improve the quality of life in these countries. Full article
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Article
Impact of Low-E Window Films on Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions of an Existing UK Hotel Building
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4265; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164265 - 07 Aug 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1669
Abstract
In order to fulfil the UK government’s ambitious goal of 80% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 compared to the levels of 1990s, unprecedented measures for improving the energy efficiency of buildings are needed. This study investigates the impact of a specific [...] Read more.
In order to fulfil the UK government’s ambitious goal of 80% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 compared to the levels of 1990s, unprecedented measures for improving the energy efficiency of buildings are needed. This study investigates the impact of a specific type of Low-emissivity (Low-E) window film—Thinsulate Climate Control 75—on the holistic energy consumption of an existing United Kingdom (UK) hotel building. Building modelling and energy simulation software EDSL TAS is used to conduct the study. The result of the simulations demonstrates that by applying Thinsulate films, savings in heating, cooling, and total energy consumptions are achieved by 3%, 20%, and 2.7%, respectively. Also 4.1% and 5.1% savings are achieved in annual CO2 emissions and total energy costs, respectively, while the initial costs may be an issue. This study found that application of Low-E window films results in slightly better energy performance of the hotel regarding its heating-dominant climate. The study also recommends using average annual actual energy consumption data for a time range, instead of picking a single year’s data for validating purposes. Full article
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