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Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021) | Viewed by 58422

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Quantitative Economics, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Oviedo, Oviedo 33006, Spain
Interests: multiple criteria decision making; fuzzy set theory; socially responsible and sustainable development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Mathematics for Economics and Business, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
2. Avda de Tarongers s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: multiple criteria decision making; fuzzy logic; sustainability; corporate social responsibility; socially responsible investment; diversity and inclusion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2015 United Nations adopted a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to “end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity of all as part of a new sustainable development agenda”. These goals include:

  • No poverty
  • Zero hunger
  • Good Health and Well-Being
  • Quality Education
  • Clean Water and Sanitation
  • Affordable and Clean Energy
  • Decent Work and Economic Growth
  • Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
  • Reduced Inequalities
  • Sustainable Cities and Communities
  • Responsible Consumption and Production
  • Climate Action
  • Life Below Water
  • Life on Land
  • Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
  • Partnerships

The achievement of all these goals requires decision making taking into account multiple decision criteria usually complex and in conflict. This Special Issue is devoted to the proposal and development of multidimensional approaches for decision making which can contribute to the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. This includes but it is not only limited to the proposal of new Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods, applied works where problems are formulated in an innovative way showing the suitability of MCDM techniques and approaches for their resolution, literature reviews contributing to enrich the actual knowledge about the problem and any other quantitative approach analyzing and treating different situation related with sustainable development goals using a multidimensional framework.

Dr. Blanca Pérez Gladish
Dr. Vicente Liern Carrión
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • diversity and inclusion
  • environment
  • development
  • multidimensional measurement framework
  • multiple criteria decision making

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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21 pages, 18760 KiB  
Article
Using a Multi-Criteria Model to Assess the Suitability of Potential Sites to Implement Off-Grid Solar PV Projects in South America
by Laura M. Hinestroza-Olascuaga, Pedro M. S. Carvalho and Célia M. S. Cardoso de Jesus
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7546; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13147546 - 6 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2206
Abstract
The role of the private sector is essential in providing energy access to all by 2030. However, private investors often face the decision problem of deciding where to implement off-grid projects. This selection process can be considered a multifactorial task because it requires [...] Read more.
The role of the private sector is essential in providing energy access to all by 2030. However, private investors often face the decision problem of deciding where to implement off-grid projects. This selection process can be considered a multifactorial task because it requires accounting not only for local conditions, technical constraints, and economic-financial feasibility but also for socio-cultural dynamics and environmental consequences. In this paper, we implemented a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) method based on the Measuring Attractiveness by a Categorical Based Evaluation Technique (MACBETH) to assist in the selection of the most suitable location to implement off-grid solar PV projects in South America. Following a participatory process with the input of a decision-maker representing the private sector, we combined 13 criteria, within 5 dimensions, to evaluate the performance of three potential sites, namely Bolivia, Peru and Colombia. Based on an overall score associated with each alternative, we grouped them into three categories: highly sustainable, sustainable, and unsustainable. As a result, Colombia represents the highest sustainable option for a potential private investor. This methodology provides guidance not only to investors but also to local utility companies and policymakers assessing off-grid locations with electricity access deficits, in developing countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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14 pages, 1498 KiB  
Article
Measuring Sustainability with Unweighted TOPSIS: An Application to Sustainable Tourism in Spain
by José Vicens-Colom, Joe Holles and Vicente Liern
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5283; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095283 - 9 May 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1996
Abstract
The measurement of sustainability is complex due to its multiple dimensions of different relative importance and different natures. From the perspective of sustainability, three types of tourism can be established: traditional tourism, sustainable tourism, and sustainable impact tourism. In the context of multiple-criteria [...] Read more.
The measurement of sustainability is complex due to its multiple dimensions of different relative importance and different natures. From the perspective of sustainability, three types of tourism can be established: traditional tourism, sustainable tourism, and sustainable impact tourism. In the context of multiple-criteria decision analysis, this paper presents a flexible method for assess and rank decision alternatives based on their sustainability. The proposal does not require the relative importance of each criterion to be precisely assigned beforehand, which reduces the subjectivity of the decision making and yields results that can be of interest for decision makers. To show the difference between these three sustainability options in tourism and the benefits of the method, the proposal is applied to public and private tourism management in Spain—in particular, to hotel booking and the evaluation and management of sustainability in the autonomous regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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19 pages, 779 KiB  
Article
MRP-PCI: A Multiple Reference Point Based Partially Compensatory Composite Indicator for Sustainability Assessment
by Francisco Ruiz and José Manuel Cabello
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031261 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2234
Abstract
Assessing different types of sustainability is a complex procedure, which implies considering aspects of very different nature. One way to do this is using a system of single indicators measuring all these different aspects and aggregating them in an overall composite indicator. In [...] Read more.
Assessing different types of sustainability is a complex procedure, which implies considering aspects of very different nature. One way to do this is using a system of single indicators measuring all these different aspects and aggregating them in an overall composite indicator. In line with the concepts of weak and strong sustainability, the compensability degree among the indicators allowed by the aggregation procedure is a crucial issue. There exist methods that allow for full compensability, zero compensability, or partial compensability. In most of them, the compensation degree is established in a global way, that is, it is the same for all the indicators. In this paper, we develop the Multiple Reference Point Partially Compensatory Indicator (MRP-PCI), where a different compensation index can be established for each indicator. The resulting method can be applied to any system of indicators, and successfully considers the compensation indices given. Some examples and comparisons are used to illustrate its behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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19 pages, 1007 KiB  
Article
Harnessing the Four Horsemen of Climate Change: A Framework for Deep Resilience, Decarbonization, and Planetary Health in Ontario, Canada
by Vidya Anderson and William A. Gough
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010379 - 4 Jan 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 6950
Abstract
Widespread implementation of nature-based solutions like green infrastructure, provides a multi-functional strategy to increase climate resilience, enhance ecological connectivity, create healthier communities, and support sustainable urban development. This paper presents a decision-support framework to facilitate adoption of green infrastructure within communities using the [...] Read more.
Widespread implementation of nature-based solutions like green infrastructure, provides a multi-functional strategy to increase climate resilience, enhance ecological connectivity, create healthier communities, and support sustainable urban development. This paper presents a decision-support framework to facilitate adoption of green infrastructure within communities using the Climate Change Local Adaptation Action Model (CCLAAM) developed for this purpose. It also presents an ecosystems-based approach to bridging the gap between climate change mitigation and adaptation actions in Ontario, Canada. Green infrastructure could be a viable strategy to address multiple climate change impacts and support the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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20 pages, 765 KiB  
Article
Inverse Malthusianism and Recycling Economics: The Case of the Textile Industry
by Francisco Salas-Molina, David Pla-Santamaria, Maria Luisa Vercher-Ferrándiz and Javier Reig-Mullor
Sustainability 2020, 12(14), 5861; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12145861 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2672
Abstract
The current use of natural resources in the textile industry leads us to introduce a new economic concept called inverse Malthusianism describing a context in which population grows linearly and resource consumption grows exponentially. Inverse Malthusianism implies an exponential increase in environmental impact [...] Read more.
The current use of natural resources in the textile industry leads us to introduce a new economic concept called inverse Malthusianism describing a context in which population grows linearly and resource consumption grows exponentially. Inverse Malthusianism implies an exponential increase in environmental impact that recycling may contribute to reduce. Our main goal is to extend the analysis of materials selection under the principle of equimarginality proposed by Jevons. As a first result, we show the particular circumstances under which policies excluding recycled supplies are never optimal. We also aim to overcome the difficulties of reducing environmental aspects to monetary units. To this end, we propose a multicriteria approach to solve the conventional-recycled materials dilemma considering not only economic but also environmental criteria. Then, we allow producers to enrich their decision-making process with relevant information about the environmental impact of materials selection. Although we use examples of the textile industry to illustrate our results, most of the insights in this paper can be extended to other industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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18 pages, 932 KiB  
Article
Measuring the Economic Impact of a Voluntary Sustainable Tourism Certification
by Amelia Bilbao-Terol and Celia Bilbao-Terol
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5465; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135465 - 7 Jul 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3496
Abstract
This article contributes to the debate about whether the investment in tourism sustainability is economically profitable for firms. Specifically, using cross-sectional analysis, we explore the existence of a causal link between the possession of a voluntary sustainable certification, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS), [...] Read more.
This article contributes to the debate about whether the investment in tourism sustainability is economically profitable for firms. Specifically, using cross-sectional analysis, we explore the existence of a causal link between the possession of a voluntary sustainable certification, Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS), and the increase in the prices of hotel accommodation. For this, the hedonic price method is used. Prior to the hedonic estimation, the propensity score-matching methodology is applied in order to control for self-selection bias. The analysis is carried out for coastal hotels located in the southern area of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) which merits attention as a typical mature sun and beach tourist destination. The study does not reveal any significant effects of sustainable certification on the prices of accommodations, which would appear to explain the low participation of establishments in the program. We conclude by providing some useful insights on measures aimed at improving related policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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22 pages, 746 KiB  
Article
CSR Disclosure: The IPO Case
by Mar Arenas-Parra and Susana Álvarez-Otero
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4390; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114390 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3727
Abstract
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the pillars of sustainable development. It is the key to operationalizing the strategic role of business in contributing towards the sustainability process. The fact that firms communicate their activities about economic sustainability, environmental sustainability, and social [...] Read more.
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the pillars of sustainable development. It is the key to operationalizing the strategic role of business in contributing towards the sustainability process. The fact that firms communicate their activities about economic sustainability, environmental sustainability, and social equity shows their commitment to society and their stakeholders. This paper analyzes the influence exerted by the composition of boards of directors on corporate social responsibility disclosure with reference to those companies that undertook an initial public offerings (IPO) in the Spanish capital market during the period 1998–2013. The empirical evidence provided by this study shows that ownership structure and board characteristics are relevant in the context of a firm’s CSR disclosure. The independent directors, non-executive directors, and large shareholder representatives affect the way in which their companies voluntarily disclose information regarding CSR. Our results lend support for a non-linear relationship between the proportion of shares in the IPO belonging to the members of the board of directors and the level of CSR reporting. We also find that the underwriter’s reputation has a positive and statistically significant influence on CSR disclosure for Spanish IPOs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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21 pages, 1691 KiB  
Article
Social Vulnerability, Gender and Disasters. The Case of Haiti in 2010
by Mar Llorente-Marrón, Montserrat Díaz-Fernández, Paz Méndez-Rodríguez and Rosario González Arias
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3574; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093574 - 28 Apr 2020
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 6692
Abstract
The study of vulnerability constitutes a central axis in research work on sustainability. Social vulnerability (SV) analyzes differences in human capacity to prepare, respond and recover from the impact of a natural hazard. Although disasters threaten all the people who suffer from them, [...] Read more.
The study of vulnerability constitutes a central axis in research work on sustainability. Social vulnerability (SV) analyzes differences in human capacity to prepare, respond and recover from the impact of a natural hazard. Although disasters threaten all the people who suffer from them, they do not affect all members of society in the same way. Social and economic inequalities make certain groups more vulnerable. Factors such as age, sex, social class and ethnic identity increase vulnerability to a natural disaster. Ten years after the earthquake in Haiti in 2010, this work deepens the relationship between natural disasters, SV and gender, exploring the unequal distribution of the SV in the face of a seismic risk. The source of statistical information has been obtained from the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), developed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Multicriteria decision techniques (TOPSIS) and the differences in differences (DID) technique are used to analyze variations in gender inequality in SV as a result of the catastrophic event. The results obtained reinforce the idea of the negative impact of the disaster on the SV. Additionally, an intensification of the negative effects is observed when the household is headed by a woman, increasing the gap in SV between households headed by women and the rest of the households. The conclusions obtained show additional evidence of the negative effects caused by natural disasters on women, and important implications for disaster risk management are derived that should not be ignored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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17 pages, 789 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Cloud Service Provider Development by a Z-Number-Based DNMA Method with Gini-Coefficient-Based Weight Determination
by Han Lai, Huchang Liao, Jonas Šaparauskas, Audrius Banaitis, Fernando A. F. Ferreira and Abdullah Al-Barakati
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3410; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083410 - 22 Apr 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 2668
Abstract
The sustainable development of cloud service providers (CSPs) is a significant multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) problem, involving the intrinsic relations among multiple alternatives, (quantitative and qualitative) decision criteria and decision-experts for the selection of trustworthy CSPs. Most existing MCDM methods for CSP [...] Read more.
The sustainable development of cloud service providers (CSPs) is a significant multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) problem, involving the intrinsic relations among multiple alternatives, (quantitative and qualitative) decision criteria and decision-experts for the selection of trustworthy CSPs. Most existing MCDM methods for CSP selection incorporated only one normalization technique in benefit and cost criteria, which would mislead the decision results and limit the applications of these methods. In addition, these methods did not consider the reliability of information given by decision-makers. Given these research gaps, this study introduces a Z-number-based double normalization-based multiple aggregation (DNMA) method to tackle quantitative and qualitative criteria in forms of benefit, cost, and target types for sustainable CSP development. We extend the original DNMA method to the Z-number environment to handle the uncertain and unreliability information of decision-makers. To make trade-offs between normalized criteria values, we develop a Gini-coefficient based weighting method to replace the mean-square-based weighting method used in the original DNMA method to enhance the applicability and isotonicity of the DNMA method. A case study is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Furthermore, comparative analysis and sensitivity analysis are implemented to test the stability and applicability of the proposed method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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22 pages, 1445 KiB  
Article
Building Sustainable Development through Technology Transfer Offices: An Approach Based on Levels of Maturity
by Adriano Mesquita Soares, João Luiz Kovaleski, Silvia Gaia and Daiane Maria de Genaro Chiroli
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1795; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051795 - 27 Feb 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2998
Abstract
This study focuses on how technology transfer offices’ (TTO) maturity level influences sustainable development in developing countries. A method for defining the maturity level of technology transfer offices was developed based on criteria, dimensions and variables from a comprehensive literature review. Technology transfer [...] Read more.
This study focuses on how technology transfer offices’ (TTO) maturity level influences sustainable development in developing countries. A method for defining the maturity level of technology transfer offices was developed based on criteria, dimensions and variables from a comprehensive literature review. Technology transfer specialists were responsible for attaching weight to elements using the multicriteria method, fuzzy simple additive weighting. Results provided an important overview of 105 Brazilian TTOs, their maturity level and the impact on sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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16 pages, 3000 KiB  
Article
Applying a Multi-Criteria Project Portfolio Tool in Selecting Energy Peat Production Areas
by Mikko Kurttila, Arto Haara, Artti Juutinen, Jouni Karhu, Paavo Ojanen, Jouni Pykäläinen, Miia Saarimaa, Oili Tarvainen, Sakari Sarkkola and Anne Tolvanen
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1705; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051705 - 25 Feb 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3056
Abstract
This study demonstrates the characteristics of the new generic project portfolio selection tool YODA (“Your Own Decision Aid”). YODA does not include a mathematical aggregation model. Instead, the decision maker’s preferences are defined by the interactive articulation of acceptance thresholds of project-level decision [...] Read more.
This study demonstrates the characteristics of the new generic project portfolio selection tool YODA (“Your Own Decision Aid”). YODA does not include a mathematical aggregation model. Instead, the decision maker’s preferences are defined by the interactive articulation of acceptance thresholds of project-level decision criteria. Transparency and ease of adopting the method in participatory planning are sought using the method’s simple preference input. The characteristics of the YODA tool are introduced by presenting how it has been applied in participatory land use planning in northern Finland in selecting a combination of peat production sites to attain the goals defined at municipal level. In this process, each stakeholder first constructed a project portfolio that best met his or her preferences. In doing this, acceptance thresholds for project-level decision criteria were defined. In total, eight decision criteria were related to economic value, biodiversity, social impacts, and ecosystem services. Subsequently, the portfolios of different stakeholders were combined in line with the principles of robust portfolio modelling. Core projects were accepted by all stakeholders, while exterior projects were not accepted, and borderline projects by some of the stakeholders. Although the land use planning situation at hand was highly sensitive, because it was related to various aspects of sustainability, the use of YODA provided useful results. The first meeting with stakeholders identified 52 out of 99 sites that none of the stakeholders would use for energy peat production, due to their characteristics, whereas, in the second meeting, a smaller stakeholder group found 18 core projects and 26 borderline projects which could be potential areas for energy peat production. We conclude that YODA—as a generic project portfolio tool—can be used in various planning situations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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22 pages, 898 KiB  
Article
Multi-Criteria Evaluation of Railway Network Performance in Countries of the TEN-T Orient–East Med Corridor
by Svetla Stoilova, Nolberto Munier, Martin Kendra and Tomáš Skrúcaný
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1482; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041482 - 17 Feb 2020
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 3892
Abstract
Railway networks have different levels of development, which affects the overall transport process and integrated sustainable development. This paper presents a methodology to assess and classify the railway network performance along the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) core network corridor. The Orient–East Med corridor [...] Read more.
Railway networks have different levels of development, which affects the overall transport process and integrated sustainable development. This paper presents a methodology to assess and classify the railway network performance along the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) core network corridor. The Orient–East Med corridor (OEM) has been examined. Twenty-two infrastructural, economic and technological criteria for assessment of railway transport have been proposed. The countries were ranked used multi-criteria decision making (MCDM), by applying the Sequential Interactive Modelling for Urban Systems (SIMUS). A sensitivity analysis was performed regarding each objective, and then, their allowable range of variation was determined without modifying the whole ranking of countries. The criteria weights have been determined on the basis of the output of using the SIMUS method. It was found that the main criteria for ranking the countries are: length of the connecting railway lines of the corridor in the country, length of the railway lines in the country, number of intermodal terminals, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, passengers transport performance, freight transport performance for the railway network, corridor freight usage intensity. It was found that the railway transport in the area of the OEM corridor located in Central Europe is better developed than in the Southeast European area. A cluster analysis was performed to classify countries into groups to verify the results. The results show that the eight countries included in the OEM corridor can be classified into three groups. The methodology could be used to make decisions about transport planning and improvement of the connectivity and sustainability of the railway transport, considering their development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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Review

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14 pages, 1405 KiB  
Review
Recent Literature about Urban Sprawl: A Renewed Relevance of the Phenomenon from the Perspective of Environmental Sustainability
by Fernando Rubiera-Morollón and Ruben Garrido-Yserte
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6551; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166551 - 13 Aug 2020
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 7727
Abstract
The urban sprawl phenomenon has attracted the attention of social researchers since the mid-20th century. It seemed that all relevant aspects had been extensively studied and that it would be difficult to produce new studies with significant contributions. However, in the last decade, [...] Read more.
The urban sprawl phenomenon has attracted the attention of social researchers since the mid-20th century. It seemed that all relevant aspects had been extensively studied and that it would be difficult to produce new studies with significant contributions. However, in the last decade, we have witnessed a revival of the literature on urban sprawl for three main reasons: (i) the existence of new methodologies to measure the phenomenon based on digital cartography and geo-referenced information, (ii) new hypotheses about the relevance of the formation of metropolitan areas not institutionally integrated into urban sprawl in many places and, mainly, (iii) the role of urban density in the environmental sustainability of cities. The recent literature on this third aspect has grown the most and around which it seems that new and interesting lines of future research will develop. The objective of this work is to present a synthetic review of the most recent literature on urban sprawl as of the end of the second decade of the XXI century. This review can serve to recapitulate the growing consensus that is being formed on the lower environmental sustainability of low-density cities and diffuse limits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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Other

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37 pages, 3026 KiB  
Systematic Review
Multiple Criteria Decision Making for the Achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals: A Systematic Literature Review and a Research Agenda
by Manuel Sousa, Maria Fatima Almeida and Rodrigo Calili
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4129; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084129 - 7 Apr 2021
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 6445
Abstract
Multiple-criteria decision making (MCDM) methods have been widely employed in various fields and disciplines, including decision problems regarding Sustainable Development (SD) issues. The main objective of this paper is to present a systematic literature review (SLR) on MCDM methods supporting decisions focusing on [...] Read more.
Multiple-criteria decision making (MCDM) methods have been widely employed in various fields and disciplines, including decision problems regarding Sustainable Development (SD) issues. The main objective of this paper is to present a systematic literature review (SLR) on MCDM methods supporting decisions focusing on the achievement of UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in regional, national, or local contexts. In this regard, 143 published scientific articles from 2016 to 2020 were retrieved from the Scopus database, selected and reviewed. They were categorized according to the decision problem associated with SDGs issues, the MCDM methodological approach, including the use (or not) of fuzzy set theory, sensitivity analysis, and multistakeholder approaches, the context of MCDM applications, and the MCDM classification (if utility-based, compromise, multi-objective, outranking, or other MCDM methods). The widespread adoption of MCDM methods in complex contexts confirms that they can help decision-makers solve multidimensional problems associated with key issues within the 2030 Agenda framework. Besides, the state-of-art review provides an improved understanding of this research field and directions for building a research agenda for those interested in advancing the research on MCDM applications in issues associated with the 2030 Agenda framework. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Sustainable Development)
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