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Integrated Planning in Climate Resilience: Disparities and Opportunities in the Implementation of Climate Planning

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Air, Climate Change and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2024 | Viewed by 2389

Special Issue Editors

Department of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, Genova, Italy
Interests: sustainable planning; mobility and transport; energy planning; ports and waterfront city; urban governance
Department of Architecture and Arts, University Iuav of Venice, Venice, Italy
Interests: resilient planning; geographic information science; urban and maritime spatial planning
Department of Architecture and Arts, University Iuav of Venice, 30135 Venice, Italy
Interests: urban planning and topics of sustainability; urban regeneration; policy design; urban resilience; climate change and strategies of mitigation and adaption (climate proof design and planning)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Even though climate change is now universally recognized and paid attention to, there are nonetheless many controversial issues in the contemporary debate at the international level. In particular, while studies are being carried out and scientific methods for predicting risks and impacts are being studied in depth, the theme of non-homogeneity in dealing with the topic and consequent planning appears to be increasingly emerging in the background. Disparities are equivalently present in spatial knowledge, social equity and implementation issues.

From a spatial knowledge point of view, differences between the different degrees of development of cities' knowledge devices (in terms of spatial databases) are one of the first causes of disparities in the adaptation process. Managing territorial resilience requires an urban knowledge system that can support the complexity of climate impact studies (in terms of vulnerability and risk assessment). Climate impact studies, in order to manage the adaptation process, need new, more dynamic data, processing big data and satellite data (in addition to normal data sources). The readiness to improve the urban knowledge system in these directions increases the capacity to respond and build adaptation strategies.

From a societal point of view, some scholars have focused on the evidence that climatic changes are having a disparate impact on the health of people of color, gender, and children; others strongly suggest how climate change is an environmental injustice that is likely to exacerbate existing racial disparities across a broad range of health outcomes.

From the point of view of implementation issues, some scholars highlight how urban resilience to climate change is addressed through sectoral plans or tools that do not allow the process to be managed in an integrated way. Other studies emphasize the opportunities but also the difficulties of designing adaptation through NBS, GI and ES. Finally, others emphasize the difficulty of developing a monitoring phase that can diagnose the efficiency and effectiveness of adaptation plan solutions.

This Special Issue aims to open a debate on the opportunities and criticalities that influence the implementation of climate plans, according to an integrated approach.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

- Strategies and measures within the urban planning and design domains;

- Adaptation-oriented urban policies;

- Presentation of case studies of cities and territories around the world;

- Fragmentation and potentialities in climate resilience planning.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Ilaria Delponte
Dr. Denis Maragno
Prof. Dr. Francesco Musco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • territorial and urban resilience
  • adaptation planning and design

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 5558 KiB  
Article
The Limitations of EMSs in Comparison with the SDGs When Considering Infrastructure Sustainability: The Case of the Terzo Valico Dei Giovi, Italy
Sustainability 2024, 16(4), 1558; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16041558 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 461
Abstract
Infrastructure plays the largest role in the amount of annual emissions, so much so that investments promoted in the European Union must be subjected to a careful assessment of the sustainability of projects. The current landscape for assessing the sustainability of infrastructure is [...] Read more.
Infrastructure plays the largest role in the amount of annual emissions, so much so that investments promoted in the European Union must be subjected to a careful assessment of the sustainability of projects. The current landscape for assessing the sustainability of infrastructure is varied and complex. Considering the object of the assessment methodologies (such as the Environmental Impact Assessment or the Ecological Management System) and specific tools such as Envision, there is a shift from the infrastructure in itself and the company’s actions to promoting sustainable development. This article introduces a methodology to examine how tools used in environmental impact assessments of transport infrastructure projects, regardless of the actor implementing them, align with different sustainable development objectives. Moreover, it identifies the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a reference point that can be used in estimating the validity of these instruments. This paper also validates the methodology proposed in our study, by comparing the results obtained on the Envision model with those obtained from its application in a case study regarding the Terzo Valico dei Giovi, a railway infrastructure in Italy. The article shows that although the final target is in many respects the same, the nuances with which actors pursue sustainability through the different instruments vary. Full article
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22 pages, 3233 KiB  
Article
Let’s Do It for Real: Making the Ecosystem Service Concept Operational in Regional Planning for Climate Change Adaptation
Sustainability 2024, 16(2), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16020483 - 05 Jan 2024
Viewed by 748
Abstract
The application of ecosystem service (ES) knowledge to planning processes and decision-making can lead to more effective climate change adaptation. Despite the increased attention given to the ES concept, its degree of integration and use in spatial planning processes are still below the [...] Read more.
The application of ecosystem service (ES) knowledge to planning processes and decision-making can lead to more effective climate change adaptation. Despite the increased attention given to the ES concept, its degree of integration and use in spatial planning processes are still below the expectations of those who are promoting this concept. Barriers hindering its operationalisation cover a span of aspects ranging from theoretical to procedural and methodological issues. Overall, there is a general lack of guidance on how and at what point ES knowledge should be integrated into planning processes. This study aims to promote the inclusion of ES knowledge into spatial planning practices and decision-making processes to enhance climate change adaptation. A replicable GIS-based methodology is proposed. First, the potential supply of ESs that can support climate change adaptation (ESCCAs) is defined, mapped, and quantified. Then, a need for an ESCCA supply is identified, and territorial capacities to respond to the expected climate change impacts on natural and socio-economic sectors are assessed. The methodology is applied to the Friuli Venezia Giulia Autonomous Region (Italy) as an illustrative case study. The results reveal that areas with similar geomorphological characteristics tend to respond similarly. Forest ecosystems, inland wetlands and specifically salt marshes can potentially supply a greater variety of ESCCAs. In the case study area, about 62% of the supplied ESCCAs can contribute to reducing the impacts in more than 50% of the impacted sectors. The territory of the study site generally shows good preparedness for expected impacts in most of the analysed sectors; less prepared areas are characterised by agricultural ecosystems. This reading approach based on land cover analyses can thus assist in developing policies to enhance different territorial capacities, ultimately leading to better and more sustainable decision-making. Full article
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14 pages, 8438 KiB  
Article
Spread Is Better: Suitability for Climate Neutrality of Italian Urban Systems
Sustainability 2023, 15(18), 13710; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151813710 - 14 Sep 2023
Viewed by 695
Abstract
In light of the challenges required by the European Green Deal policies concerning the achievement of climate neutrality by 2050, this paper analyses the suitability of different Italian urban systems for energy consumption and CO2 emission reduction. In anthropised territories, there are [...] Read more.
In light of the challenges required by the European Green Deal policies concerning the achievement of climate neutrality by 2050, this paper analyses the suitability of different Italian urban systems for energy consumption and CO2 emission reduction. In anthropised territories, there are strong relationships between energy consumption, climate-changing emissions and settlement patterns. Lands considered low could increase their rating because they have far greater environmental, energy and land resources than more pivotal ones. After an Italian-scale overview of the ecosystem capacities, this paper develops a detailed study of three exemplary areas: the northeast, the northwest, and the central-west coast. The analysis uses Burkhard’s matrix for ecosystem values and the energy consumption 2021 report of the National Energy Authority. The first finding is that the northeast region, characterised by spread and rarefied urbanisation, has a peculiar suitability for climate neutrality. In the results, spread territories perform much better than centralised ones. The coexistence of little urban cores, space for vegetation and a widespread water network promotes synergies for enhancing an ecosystem approach to land design. Full article
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