Special Issue "Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Franklin G. Mixon
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Economic Education, Columbus State University, Columbus, GA 31907, USA
Interests: Public Economics; Labor Economics; Industrial Organization; Scientometrics; Sports; Economics; Economic Education; Applied Econometrics; Game Theory; Education Economics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interest in the environment and its subordinate elements of common-pool resources and sustainability appears to be as high as ever. This Special Issue of Sustainability aims to provide a collection of high-quality studies covering many of the varied topics traditionally investigated in the broad area of common-pool resources and sustainability. These include, but are not limited to, property rights formation, conservation, depletion, the tragedy of the commons, free riding, externalities, special interest groups, international agreements and treaties, government regulation, and international organizations. We welcome original papers relating to these and other aspects of common-pool resources and sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Franklin G. Mixon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • common-pool resources
  • property rights
  • externalities
  • special interest groups
  • environmental regulation
  • tragedy of the commons
  • conservation
  • sustainability
  • international agreements

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Monetary Valuation and Internalization of Externalities in German Agriculture Using the Example of Nitrate Pollution: A Case-Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6681; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166681 - 18 Aug 2020
Abstract
Plants are dependent on nitrogen for their growth. However, if more plant nutrients are deposited than the plant can absorb, the excess nitrogen seeps into the soil where it accumulates as nitrate. About 74% of the drinking water produced in Germany comes from [...] Read more.
Plants are dependent on nitrogen for their growth. However, if more plant nutrients are deposited than the plant can absorb, the excess nitrogen seeps into the soil where it accumulates as nitrate. About 74% of the drinking water produced in Germany comes from groundwater. The legal limit of 50 milligrams of nitrate per liter of fresh water is exceeded frequently in Germany, especially in agricultural areas. High levels of nitrate in drinking water can quickly lead to health issues, under certain conditions. The nitrate problem is omnipresent in Germany. However, studies which determine the externalized costs of nitrogen eutrophication are mostly missing. The present study closes this gap by combining the results of a transdisciplinary investigation from hydrological analyses and environmental-economic calculations. Water samples were taken from a deep well in Hauneck, which is a municipality in Hesse (Germany). Afterwards, an isotope analysis was carried out to determine the groundwater residence time and possible sources of nitrate. Thus, in addition to the sources of pollution, concrete social costs were determined, using a damage cost approach as well as an avoidance cost approach. For Hauneck, it was found that about 54% of the drinking water price is directly linked to the externalization of costs. These are borne via the principle of the common burden. In addition, the isotope investigations have shown that the removal of excess nitrate will continue for decades, which will lead to long term external costs. The paper reveals how the internalization of these costs can contribute to the conservation of water resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Is Sustainable Watershed Management Feasible under Climate Change? An Economic Appraisal of the Nile River
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010162 - 24 Dec 2019
Abstract
Historically, the Nile, a well-known transboundary river, has been a major contributor to Egyptian economic growth in many ways but has suffered from sediment accumulation. Since anthropocentric activities on the Nile delta heavily rely on nutrient-rich sediment from the Ethiopian highland, sediment control [...] Read more.
Historically, the Nile, a well-known transboundary river, has been a major contributor to Egyptian economic growth in many ways but has suffered from sediment accumulation. Since anthropocentric activities on the Nile delta heavily rely on nutrient-rich sediment from the Ethiopian highland, sediment control schemes in the Aswan High Dam not only prolong the life of the dam but also increase the economic value of the watershed. The purpose of our study is to use an economic optimization approach to evaluate the feasibility of sustainable management of the Nile concerning climate change. The model considers significant anthropocentric effects on the reservoir as well as the impacts of climate change on the entire watershed. Moreover, the social planner’s model is developed to unravel somewhat numerous externalities. The results indicate that among the various technically feasible sediment removal schemes, the hydro-suction sediment removal system (HSRS) is the only desirable solution under severe climate change. In order to control the negative externalities in the watershed, the in-stream flow control should be applied. By implementing appropriate management schemes simultaneously, the life of the AHD can be extended, and the total economic benefits of the entire watershed can be maximized to approximately $272 billion USD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Navigating Input and Output Legitimacy in Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives: Institutional Stewards at Work
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6621; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236621 - 23 Nov 2019
Abstract
Multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) are a form of private governance sometimes used to manage the social and environmental impacts of supply chains. We argue that there is a potential tension between input and output legitimacy in MSIs. Input legitimacy requires facilitating representation from a [...] Read more.
Multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) are a form of private governance sometimes used to manage the social and environmental impacts of supply chains. We argue that there is a potential tension between input and output legitimacy in MSIs. Input legitimacy requires facilitating representation from a wide range of organizations with heterogeneous interests. This work, however, faces collective action problems that could lead to limited ambitions, lowering output legitimacy. We find that, under the right conditions a relatively small group of motivated actors, who we call institutional stewards, may be willing to undertake the cost and labor of building and maintaining the MSI. This can help reconcile the tension between input and output legitimacy in a formal sense, though it also results in inequalities in power. We test this claim using a case study of organizations’ activities in the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). We find that a small group of founding members—and other members of long tenure—account for a disproportionate level of activity in the organization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Moral Hazard Evolutionary Mechanism for BIM Implementation in an Integrated Project Team
Sustainability 2019, 11(20), 5719; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11205719 - 16 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a new emerging delivery system, contributes to increase value to the owner, reduces waste and maximizes efficiency in the life cycle of projects. However, IPD system has not yet shifted from pilot-alike or particular-purposed cases to large-scale applications. [...] Read more.
Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a new emerging delivery system, contributes to increase value to the owner, reduces waste and maximizes efficiency in the life cycle of projects. However, IPD system has not yet shifted from pilot-alike or particular-purposed cases to large-scale applications. The huge advantages of building information modeling (BIM) are far from being exploited, which directly leads to the delivered outcomes below expectations, thereby causing obstacles to widespread application of IPD system. The reasons impeding the successful application of BIM has been a hot topic. Previous studies suggested that moral hazard behavior is a critical inducer leading to the undesirable outcomes. However, very few studies have studied the evolution mechanism of moral hazard behavior for BIM application. To fill this knowledge gap, this study proposed a novel model, aiming to capture dynamically the interactive behavior of BIM-based strategy selections using evolutionary game theory. Five parameters of monitoring cost, proprietary cost, incentive payment, punishment and speculative benefit are extracted and defined in the proposed model. Numerical simulations are conducted with MATLAB 2016a. The simulation results showed that when incentive payment is higher than the sum of speculative benefit and proprietary cost, interactive behavior of both game players will move toward the optimal portfolio strategy. Incentive payment and punishment have negative correlations with the probability of moral hazard behavior for BIM application. Parameters of speculative benefit and proprietary cost affect positively implementation probability of moral hazard behavior of employing BIM. This study can provide theoretical and managerial implications for integrated project managers and related government department to improve implementation of BIM and IPD system, and also contribute to its sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
The Economics and Politics of Carbon Taxes and Regulations: Evidence from Voting on Washington State’s Initiative 732
Sustainability 2019, 11(13), 3667; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133667 - 04 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In November 2016, Washington State voters were presented with a ballot initiative (Initiative 732) advancing the first carbon tax on production and use of fossil fuels in the United States. Initiative 732 promised to reduce fossil fuel consumption by taxing carbon emissions, while [...] Read more.
In November 2016, Washington State voters were presented with a ballot initiative (Initiative 732) advancing the first carbon tax on production and use of fossil fuels in the United States. Initiative 732 promised to reduce fossil fuel consumption by taxing carbon emissions, while remaining revenue-neutral by lowering taxes on businesses, consumers, and working families. In promising revenue-neutrality, Initiative 732 sought support beyond environmentalists and similarly sympathetic voters. It failed to pass, achieving 41.2 percent of votes cast. To investigate this initiative’s failure at the ballot, we analyzed zip code-level voting patterns and demographic data. Relying on a two-step LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) + OLS (Ordinary Least Squares) procedure, our results suggest that the framing of revenue-neutrality did not sufficiently satisfy moderate right-leaning voters regarding perceived costs of the carbon tax. We also found evidence suggesting not only that some voting segments may have opposed revenue-neutrality, but that those facing higher climate change risk did not appear to see the initiative’s value net of expected costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Men in Grey Suits: Shark Activity and Congestion of the Surfing Commons
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3114; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113114 - 03 Jun 2019
Abstract
This study extends recent research on informal property rights at surf breaks by exploring the process through which nature, by establishing conditions conducive (or not) to the presence of sharks, shapes the baseline level of exploitation by surfers of the common-pool resource represented [...] Read more.
This study extends recent research on informal property rights at surf breaks by exploring the process through which nature, by establishing conditions conducive (or not) to the presence of sharks, shapes the baseline level of exploitation by surfers of the common-pool resource represented by surf breaks. Since 1980, there have been nine fatal shark attacks off the coast of California, and in all nine cases the great white shark was the offending species. Given this inherent danger, the presence of large sharks mitigates, at least to some degree, the tendency toward the ‘tragedy of the commons’ in the case of surf breaks. Using data on surf break congestion, surf break quality, shark activity, and other key variables from 144 surf breaks in California, empirical results from OLS and ordered probit models presented in this study indicate that surf breaks in California that are associated with the highest levels of shark activity tend to be less congested, perhaps by as much as 28%, than their counterparts that are visited less often by sharks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Monetary Valuation of Urban Forest Attributes in Highly Developed Urban Environments: An Experimental Study Using a Conjoint Choice Model
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2461; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072461 - 13 Jul 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
It is important to integrate user preferences and demands into the design, planning, and management of urban forests. This is particularly important in highly urbanized areas where land is extremely limited. Based on a survey with 600 participants selected by quota sampling in [...] Read more.
It is important to integrate user preferences and demands into the design, planning, and management of urban forests. This is particularly important in highly urbanized areas where land is extremely limited. Based on a survey with 600 participants selected by quota sampling in Seoul, Korea, we developed a conjoint choice model for determining the preferences of urban dwellers on urban forest attributes, the levels of attributes, and the preferences for particular attributes. Then, the preferences were transformed into monetary values. The results indicated that urban dwellers preferred broadleaved forests over coniferous forests, soil-type pavement materials over porous elastic pavement materials on trails, and relatively flat trails over trails with steep slopes. The model indicated that participants were willing to pay an additional 11.42 USD to change coniferous forest to broadleaved forest, 15.09 USD to alter porous elastic pavement materials on trails to soil-type pavement materials on trails, and 23.8 USD to modify steeply sloping trails to relatively flat trails. As previously reported, considerable distance decay effects have been observed in the user preferences for urban forests. We also found a significant difference in the amount of the mean marginal willingness to pay among sociodemographic subgroups. In particular, there were significant positive responses from the male group to changes in urban forest attributes and their levels in terms of their willingness to pay additional funds. By contrast, the elderly group had the opposite response. In this study, we were not able to integrate locality and spatial variation in user preferences for urban forests derived from locational characteristics. In future studies, the role of limiting factors in user preferences for urban forests and their attributes should be considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Common-Pool Resources and Sustainability)
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