Special Issue "Agricultural Landscape Stability and Sustainable Land Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yu Cao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Land Management, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, P. R. China
Interests: landscape ecology; land use and land cover change; ecosystem services; landscape sustainability; agricultural landscape stability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Issue of Sustainability titled “Agricultural Landscape Stability and Sustainable Land Management”. The agricultural landscape is a typical landscape characterized by the interaction between human beings and nature; it possesses multifunctional value, with services such as food production, environmental regulation, and culture. Due to the rapid global industrialization and urbanization process, the vast agricultural landscape has undergone substantial changes, although the multifunctional value of the agricultural landscape cannot be replaced by other landscapes (e.g., urban, forest, and wetland). Besides, the external spatial pattern and the internal function of the agricultural landscape affect the sustainable development of a region. While many studies have examined the evolution of the spatial pattern of agricultural landscapes, the effects of changes in agricultural landscape functions and environmental effects on sustainable development under the influence of human activities have not been fully understood. Therefore, this Special Issue focuses on the theme of agricultural landscape stability and sustainable land management, covering topics related to environmental, social, and economic dimensions, and requires a multidisciplinary approach to study agricultural landscape changes with a scientific question closely related to landscape sustainability and sustainable agricultural land management strategy. Papers submitted for this Special Issue will be subjected to a rigorous peer-review process with the goal of the rapid and wide dissemination of results, developments, and applications.

The Special Issue covers topics including but not limited to the following:

  • Multidimensional value of the agricultural landscape;
  • Agricultural landscape stability;
  • Quantitative methods for the sustainability of the agricultural landscape;
  • Comprehensive rural development;
  • Urban expansion and agricultural landscape evolution;
  • Ecosystem services in the agricultural landscape;
  • Sustainable cultivated land management strategy;
  • Cultivated land protection and food security in developing countries;
  • Ecological compensation for cultivated land occupation;
  • Rural spatial planning and regional governance;
  • Rural renewal and ecological restoration.

Prof. Dr. Yu Cao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Multifunctional agriculture
  • Ecosystem services
  • Rural–urban interactions
  • Agricultural sustainability
  • Cultivated landscape dynamic
  • Landscape dynamic modeling
  • Ecological compensation
  • Agricultural cultural heritage
  • Rural spatial planning
  • Regional governance
  • Rural ecological restoration
  • Landscape stability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Technification in Dairy Farms May Reconcile Habitat Conservation in a Brazilian Savanna Region
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5606; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105606 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 482
Abstract
The assessment of the relationships between farm management systems and nature conservation may help in the design of more efficient strategies to uphold economic benefits and biodiversity conservation. To our knowledge, this is the first work in Brazil to study the relationship between [...] Read more.
The assessment of the relationships between farm management systems and nature conservation may help in the design of more efficient strategies to uphold economic benefits and biodiversity conservation. To our knowledge, this is the first work in Brazil to study the relationship between farm conservation status and technification level. Here, we test the hypothesis that dairy farms with higher levels of technification have a higher percentage of natural vegetation and connectivity, and that differences in environment features between farms explain their conservation status. We obtained variables related to the level of technification such as feed, milking, sanitary control and breeding management systems. We show that farmers with a higher level of technification, such as artificial insemination in cattle breeding, tended to conserve a higher percentage of natural vegetation, as well as larger farms with a higher percentage of riparian forest. The adoption of artificial insemination is associated with other technification systems such as a forage diet, milking method and frequency and sanitary control. It is also significantly related to higher milk productivity. Our novel results point to a positive effect of technification on the conservation of natural vegetation, suggesting that economic incentives and programs aimed at increasing technification in cattle breeding may increase dairy production and conservation within the study area. Our findings also show an effect of larger areas of riparian forests, which are protected by Brazilian policy, in the conservation status of dairy farms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Landscape Stability and Sustainable Land Management)
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Article
Multi-Temporal Arable Land Monitoring in Arid Region of Northwest China Using a New Extraction Index
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5274; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095274 - 08 May 2021
Viewed by 3964
Abstract
Development of a high-accuracy method to extract arable land using effective data sources is crucial to detect and monitor arable land dynamics, servicing land protection and sustainable development. In this study, a new arable land extraction index (ALEI) based on spectral analysis was [...] Read more.
Development of a high-accuracy method to extract arable land using effective data sources is crucial to detect and monitor arable land dynamics, servicing land protection and sustainable development. In this study, a new arable land extraction index (ALEI) based on spectral analysis was proposed, examined by ground truth data, and then applied to the Hexi Corridor in northwest China. The arable land and its change patterns during 1990–2020 were extracted and identified using 40 Landsat TM/OLI images acquired in 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can distinguish arable land areas accurately, with the User’s (Producer’s) accuracy and overall accuracy (kappa coefficient) exceeding 0.90 (0.88) and 0.89 (0.87), respectively. The mean relative error calculated using field survey data obtained in 2012 and 2020 was 0.169 and 0.191, respectively, indicating the feasibility of the ALEI method in arable land extracting. The study found that arable land area in the Hexi Corridor was 13217.58 km2 in 2020, significantly increased by 25.33% compared to that in 1990. At 10-year intervals, the arable land experienced different change patterns. The study results indicate that ALEI index is a promising tool used to effectively extract arable land in the arid area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Landscape Stability and Sustainable Land Management)
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