Special Issue "Hydration in Sport and Exercise"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Éric Goulet
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Performance, Hydration and Thermoregulation Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Activity Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
Interests: exercise; hydration and exercise; dehydration; protein metabolism; human performance; sarcopenia; insulin sensitivity; aging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although work is still required, the impacts of exercise-induced dehydration upon physiological functions and physical and cognitive performances have been relatively well-established over the years. What has received less attention from researchers, however, is the impact of various hydration strategies, implemented either before, during, following exercise or a combination of these periods, on the aforementioned variables. In fact, although individual athletes or practitioners are well informed about the numerous consequences of inadequate hydration during exercise, little information exists as to how individuals should hydrate for optimizing exercise performance, health and mental abilities while considering the different factors inherent to a given athlete, sport or situation. The goal of this Special Issue is to highlight new research findings examining how the modulation of fluid intake before, during or after exercise impacts the capacity of humans during exercise.

Prof. Éric Goulet
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cognitive performance
  • dehydration
  • exercise
  • health
  • hydration strategy
  • hyperhydration
  • physical performance
  • rehydration

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Thirst-Driven Fluid Intake on 1 H Cycling Time-Trial Performance in Trained Endurance Athletes
Sports 2019, 7(10), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7100223 - 14 Oct 2019
Abstract
A meta-analysis demonstrated that programmed fluid intake (PFI) aimed at fully replacing sweat losses during a 1 h high-intensity cycling exercise impairs performance compared with no fluid intake (NFI). It was reported that thirst-driven fluid intake (TDFI) may optimize cycling performance, compared with [...] Read more.
A meta-analysis demonstrated that programmed fluid intake (PFI) aimed at fully replacing sweat losses during a 1 h high-intensity cycling exercise impairs performance compared with no fluid intake (NFI). It was reported that thirst-driven fluid intake (TDFI) may optimize cycling performance, compared with when fluid is consumed more than thirst dictates. However, how TDFI, compared with PFI and NFI, impacts performance during a 1 h cycling time-trial performance remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of NFI, TDFI and PFI on 1 h cycling time-trial performance. Using a randomized, crossover and counterbalanced protocol, 9 (7 males and 2 females) trained endurance athletes (30 ± 9 years; Peak V · O2∶ 59 ± 8 mL·kg−1·min−1) completed three 1 h cycling time-trials (30 °C, 50% RH) with either NFI, TDFI or PFI designed to maintain body mass (BM) at ~0.5% of pre-exercise BM. Body mass loss reached 2.9 ± 0.4, 2.2 ± 0.3 and 0.6 ± 0.2% with NFI, TDFI and PFI, respectively. Heart rate, rectal and mean skin temperatures and ratings of perceived exertion and of abdominal discomfort diverged marginally among trials. Mean distance completed (NFI: 35.6 ± 1.9 km; TDFI: 35.8 ± 2.0; PFI: 35.7 ± 2.0) and, hence, average power output maintained during the time-trials did not significantly differ among trials, and the impact of both PFI and TDFI vs. NFI was deemed trivial or unclear. These findings indicate that neither PFI nor TDFI are likely to offer any advantage over NFI during a 1 h cycling time-trial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydration in Sport and Exercise)
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