Fatigue and Recovery in Sport

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 9863

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre d'Expertise de la Performance, INSERM U1093 CAPS, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, 21078 Dijon, France
Interests: stretching and flexibility; neuromuscular; resistance training adaptations; fatigue and recovery; sports performance; neuromuscular electrical stimulation
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Guest Editor
Director of Muscle and Tendon Plasticity Research Group, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, Brazil
Interests: Physical Agents in Exercise and Rehabilitation; Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES); Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation; muscle atrophy; Exercise Physiology; Connective Tissue remodeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Competitive sport requires a large amount of training (and competition, for instance, in team sports). This will inevitably produce fatigue, with multiple mechanisms originating, for example, from the neuromuscular or cardiovascular system. The complexity of fatigue is reinforced by the interaction between all possible mechanisms and the dependence on the type of exercise performed. Understanding these mechanisms and the recovery processes (or strategies) are key factors to optimize training and, therefore, adaptations and performance. Moreover, multiple strategies could help practitioners to build efficient training sessions and plans while also preventing injuries. This could include the control of fitness level and the monitoring of training loads. As such, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide new insights into fatigue and recovery processes. We welcome papers exploring physiological mechanisms or sports performance in laboratory or sport settings. We also welcome papers that explore new strategies or tools that could help practitioners to establish efficient training plans.

Dr. Nicolas Babault
Dr. Joao Luiz Durigan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fatigue and recovery
  • exercise modality
  • neuromuscular
  • cognitive
  • endurance
  • sport performance
  • training load
  • fitness status
  • mental
  • nutrition
  • injury prevention

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2576 KiB  
Article
Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse and Spray Improve Prolonged Exercise Performance in Recreationally Trained Male College Students
by Asako Shirai, Tsuyoshi Wadazumi, Yoko Hirata, Naomi Hamada and Nobuko Hongu
Sports 2022, 10(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports10040051 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3898
Abstract
Mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution has emerged as a sports nutrition strategy to increase endurance performance. This study aimed to clarify the effects of two forms of CHO sensing in the mouth (i.e., CHO mouth rinse (CMR) and CHO mouth spray [...] Read more.
Mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution has emerged as a sports nutrition strategy to increase endurance performance. This study aimed to clarify the effects of two forms of CHO sensing in the mouth (i.e., CHO mouth rinse (CMR) and CHO mouth spray (CMS)) on exercise performance during prolonged exercise, including ultra-high intensity intermittent exercise over time. We conducted the following experimental trials: (1) 6% glucose solution (G), (2) 6% CMR, (3) 6% CMS, and (4) water (WAT). These trials were conducted at least 1 week apart in a randomized crossover design. Eight male college students performed constant-load exercise for 60 min (intensity 40% VO2peak), four sets of the Wingate test (three 30 s Wingate tests with a 4 min recovery between each test), and a constant-load exercise for 30 min (intensity 40% VO2peak). The mean exercise power output (Watt), ratings of perceived exertion, and blood glucose levels were measured. We found that the mean power values of the CMR and CMS in the third and fourth sets was significantly higher than that of WAT (p < 0.05), and that the G trial did not show a significant difference from any other trial. Thus, when compared to G or WAT, CMR and CMS can help improve endurance exercise performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue and Recovery in Sport)
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11 pages, 608 KiB  
Article
Quantifying Accelerations and Decelerations in Elite Women Soccer Players during Regular In-Season Training as an Index of Training Load
by Tom Douchet, Allex Humbertclaude, Carole Cometti, Christos Paizis and Nicolas Babault
Sports 2021, 9(8), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9080109 - 31 Jul 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4955
Abstract
Accelerations (ACC) and decelerations (DEC) are important and frequent actions in soccer. We aimed to investigate whether ACC and DEC were good indicators of the variation of training loads in elite women soccer players. Changes in the training load were monitored during two [...] Read more.
Accelerations (ACC) and decelerations (DEC) are important and frequent actions in soccer. We aimed to investigate whether ACC and DEC were good indicators of the variation of training loads in elite women soccer players. Changes in the training load were monitored during two different selected weeks (considered a “low week” and a “heavy week”) during the in-season. Twelve elite soccer women playing in the French first division wore a 10-Hz Global Positioning System unit recording total distance, distance within speed ranges, sprint number, ACC, DEC, and a heart rate monitor during six soccer training sessions and rated their perceived exertion (RPE). They answered the Hooper questionnaire (sleep, stress, fatigue, DOMS) to get an insight of their subjective fitness level at the start (Hooper S) and at the end of each week (Hooper E). A countermovement jump (CMJ) was also performed once a week. During the heavy week, the training load was significantly greater than the low week when considering number of ACC >2 m·s−2 (28.2 ± 11.9 vs. 56.1 ± 10.1, p < 0.001) and number of DEC < −2 m·s−2 (31.5 ± 13.4 vs. 60.9 ± 14.4, p < 0.001). The mean heart rate percentage (HR%) (p < 0.05), RPE (p < 0.001), and Hooper E (p < 0.001) were significantly greater during the heavy week. ACC and DEC showed significant correlations with most outcomes: HR%, total distance, distance per min, sprint number, Hooper index of Hooper E, DOMS E, Fatigue E, RPE, and session RPE. We concluded that, for elite women soccer players, quantifying ACC and DEC alongside other indicators seemed to be essential for a more complete training load monitoring. Indeed, it could lead to a better understanding of the reasons why athletes get fatigued and give insight into neuromuscular, rather than only energetic, fatigue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue and Recovery in Sport)
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