Pediatric Sinusitis

A special issue of Sinusitis and Asthma (ISSN 2624-7003).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2018) | Viewed by 18157

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Allergy & Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68131, USA
Interests: asthma and allergy pathophysiology; asthma and allergy pharmacotherapy; epidemiology of asthma and allergic rhinitis; pathophysiology of airway reactivity; the interaction of sinusitis and chronic serous otitis media; food allergy; eosinophilic esophagitis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic sinusitis in children has largely become an orphan disease. Well recognized as a concept in both medical and lay lexicons, any meaningful medical advancements have lagged.

International sinusitis guidelines have adjusted the terminology for adult sinus disease, with terms including chronic infectious rhinosinusitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps, without polyps, with or without aspirin allergy, eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, or neutrophilic rhinosinusitis [1,2]. In many adults, concomitant asthma and/or allergic rhinitis co-exist.

Pediatric chronic sinusitis has morphed, descriptively, to the term chronic pediatric rhinosinusitis [3]; a more accurate term would actually be pediatric chronic infectious rhinosinusitis. Sorely lacking is any further differentiation, as is seen in adults. Additionally absent is information on the microbiome of the condition (before or after therapy), appropriate diagnostic techniques, modern antibiotic treatment options, or appropriateness of surgical approaches in children. Unfortunately, as this disease is in children, pharmaceutical and/or scientific granting agencies have not supported modern investigations of any pharmacy–medical–surgical comparisons.

This Special Issue is targeted at updating the known understanding of pediatric infectious chronic rhinosinusitis and projecting potential next steps in investigating this widely recognized, but understudied, condition.

Prof. Russell J. Hopp
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sinusitis and Asthma is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

References

  1. Fokkens, W.J.; Lund, V.J.; Mullol, J.; Bachert, C.; Alobid, I.; Baroody, F.; Cohen, N.; Cervin, A.; Douglas, R.; Gevaert, P.; et al. European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps 2012. Suppl. 2012, 23, 1–299.
  2. Orlandi, R.R.; Kingdom, T.T.; Hwang, P.H.; Smith, T.L.; Alt, J.A.; Baroody, F.M.; Batra, P.S.; Bernal-Sprekelsen, M.; Bhattacharyya, N.; Chandra, R.K.; et al. International consensus statement on allergy and rhinology: Rhinosinusitis. Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2015; 6, S22–S209.
  3. Brietzke, S.; Shin, J.; Choi, S.; Lee, J.T.; Parikh, S.R.; Pena, M.; Prager, J.D.; Ramadan, H.; Veling, M.; Corrigan, C.; et al. Clinical Consensus Statement: Pediatric Chronic Rhinosinusitis. Head Neck Surg. 2014, 151, 542–553.

 

Keywords

  • pediatric chronic sinusitis
  • pediatric chronic infectious rhinosinusitis
  • microbiome
  • microbial colonization
  • rhinosinusitis
  • antibiotics
  • antimicrobial therapy
  • biofilm
  • adenoidectomy
  • balloon sinuplasty
  • ostiomeatal complex
  • sinus surgery
  • functional endoscopic sinus surgery
  • sinus CT
  • sinus X-ray

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

5 pages, 173 KiB  
Review
An Overview of Surgical Approaches to Pediatric Chronic Sinusitis for Primary Care Providers
by Ryan K. Sewell
Sinusitis 2018, 3(2), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/sinusitis3020004 - 04 Apr 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4733
Abstract
Pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis is a common condition amongst pediatric patients. Despite its prevalence, debate continues regarding the best treatment strategies. The current paper examines the literature as it pertains to the surgical management of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis. Adenoidectomy remains the mainstay in the [...] Read more.
Pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis is a common condition amongst pediatric patients. Despite its prevalence, debate continues regarding the best treatment strategies. The current paper examines the literature as it pertains to the surgical management of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis. Adenoidectomy remains the mainstay in the initial surgical management. Both maxillary sinus irrigation and balloon dilation of the sinuses have been studied with disagreement as to the timing and patient selection for those procedures. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is an accepted treatment modality, especially in initial surgical failures. Further studies will be needed to better delineate patient selection and timing of specific surgical techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Sinusitis)
8 pages, 257 KiB  
Review
Rhinosinutis and Asthma in Children
by Amelia Licari, Ilaria Brambilla, Riccardo Castagnoli, Alessia Marseglia, Valeria Paganelli, Thomas Foiadelli and Gian Luigi Marseglia
Sinusitis 2018, 3(2), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/sinusitis3020003 - 26 Mar 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4852
Abstract
Rhinosinusitis and asthma are two comorbid conditions that lead to pathological and clinical diseases affecting the respiratory tract. They are connected by significant anatomical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical evidence, and also share therapeutic principles. The aim of this review is to provide an [...] Read more.
Rhinosinusitis and asthma are two comorbid conditions that lead to pathological and clinical diseases affecting the respiratory tract. They are connected by significant anatomical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical evidence, and also share therapeutic principles. The aim of this review is to provide an updated overview of the existing link between rhinosinusitis and asthma focusing on the pediatric age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Sinusitis)
7 pages, 167 KiB  
Review
State-of-the-Art Adult Chronic Rhinosinusitis Microbiome: Perspective for Future Studies in Pediatrics
by M. Asghar Pasha
Sinusitis 2018, 3(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/sinusitis3010001 - 05 Feb 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4194
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a prevalent disease that causes persistent mucosal inflammation and is associated with bacterial infection, which is thought to play a role in the inflammatory process. Microbiome analysis provides insight to host–microbial interactions. Disturbances in the host and commensal bacteria [...] Read more.
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a prevalent disease that causes persistent mucosal inflammation and is associated with bacterial infection, which is thought to play a role in the inflammatory process. Microbiome analysis provides insight to host–microbial interactions. Disturbances in the host and commensal bacteria interaction may lead to CRS. Culture-based methods are useful to isolate some microorganisms but are unable to grow a majority of the bacteria. A review of the literature shows that several recent studies attempted to overcome this issue by using molecular techniques, such as microbial RNA sequencing, to describe the CRS microbiome. All of these studies were performed in adults, with no comparative studies reported in the pediatric population. Similar studies, utilizing molecular techniques, are needed to better understand the mechanism of CRS in children. Because valuable data from these adult studies may help to bridge the gap in our knowledge of the microbiome in pediatric CRS, we present an overview of the methodology and results behind the current microbiomic approach to adult CRS to set the stage for its use in the study of CRS in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Sinusitis)
193 KiB  
Review
Do Adult Forms of Chronic Rhinosinusitis Exist in Children and Adolescents?
by Russell J. Hopp
Sinusitis 2017, 2(4), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/sinusitis2040007 - 18 Dec 2017
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3988
Abstract
Pediatric chronic sinusitis is currently designated as pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis. In most pediatric cases, sinusitis is considered as infectious. In the adult literature, a wider repertoire of chronic rhinosinusitis conditions is recognized. In this review, the adult forms of chronic rhinosinusitis are used [...] Read more.
Pediatric chronic sinusitis is currently designated as pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis. In most pediatric cases, sinusitis is considered as infectious. In the adult literature, a wider repertoire of chronic rhinosinusitis conditions is recognized. In this review, the adult forms of chronic rhinosinusitis are used as a framework for identifying and defining the potential spectrum of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis that exists beyond the most recognized condition, pediatric infectious chronic rhinosinusitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Sinusitis)
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