Special Issue "Economy and Finance in Smart-Cities"

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Isam Shahrour
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Geo-Environmental Laboratory, Lille University, 59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France
Interests: smart city; smart energy; smart water; smart infrastructures; civil engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Fateh BELAID
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lille Catholic University, Faculty of Management, Economics & Sciences.
UMR 9221-LEM-Lille Économie Management, Lille -59016– France
Interests: Investment; Applied Econometrics; Econometric Analysis; Applied Economics; Finance; Innovation; Energy Environment; Economy Risk Management
Prof. Dr. Véronique FLAMBARD
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Lille Catholic University, Faculty of Management, Economics & Sciences.
UMR 9221-LEM-Lille Économie Management, Lille -59016– France
Interests: Economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart city is spreading very quickly around the world with the objective to use both digital and social innovation to transform our cities into socio- and eco- friendly cities, that improve the quality of life, optimize resources consumption and promote social and economic activities.

Important researches have already been conducted in the use of digital technology for mart city transformation. However, a successful smart city transformation requires a deep investigation of issues related to the economy and finance of smart cities, such as the economic model, finance mechanisms, economic return of the investment, integration of environmental and social benefits in the economic return and the private and public partnership. In addition, the smart city concept opens large perspectives for innovation in the field of smart finance and smart economy.

The objective of this paper is to publish original papers concerning economics and financing in smart cities with a special interest for feed-back from smart city projects or from related issues such as smart buildings, smart water, smart energy and smart transport. This issue is also interested by innovative concepts and frameworks in the field of Smart Finance and Smart Economy.

Prof. Dr. Isam SHAHROUR
Prof. Dr. Fateh BELAID
Prof. Dr. Véronique FLAMBARD
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Smart City
  • Economy
  • innovation
  • challenges
  • opportunities
  • Smart Economy
  • Smart Finance
  • Social

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
New Energy Policy Directions in the European Union Developing the Concept of Smart Cities
Smart Cities 2021, 4(1), 241-252; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities4010015 - 09 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 910
Abstract
In the context of the European Union promoting clean energy, sustainability and better living conditions for its citizens, the development of smarts cities is an initiative supported at the European Union level, in line with the new energy policies of the European Union [...] Read more.
In the context of the European Union promoting clean energy, sustainability and better living conditions for its citizens, the development of smarts cities is an initiative supported at the European Union level, in line with the new energy policies of the European Union promoted by the package “Clean Energy for All Europeans”. The concept of smart cities gains increasing importance in the European Union, a fact that is reflected in the project “European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities” of the European Commission. Smart cities are a practical example of how the new energy policies shape the lives of the European Union citizens, trying to improve it. As a consequence, new business models arise in big cities, involving the use of technology for better living conditions. These new, technology-based business models are important, as they improve the life quality of the inhabitants, they reduce the climate change impact, and they contribute as well to job creation in the IT-industry, promoting innovation. They have as well a social impact, as they bring experts from energy policies, business, economics, legal and IT together in order to project a new type of city—the smart city. The research hypothesis of the present article is that there is a high acceptance towards the concept of smart cities at the European Union level and that this concept could be implemented with the help of information technology and of artificial intelligence. This way, legal provisions, economic measures and IT-tools work together in order to create synergy effects for better life quality of the citizens of the European Union. The research hypothesis is analyzed by means of the questionnaire as a qualitative research method and is as well assessed by using case studies (e.g., Austria, Finland, Romania). The novelty of the case studies is that the development of smart cities is analyzed due to the new trend towards sustainability in two countries with different living conditions in the European Union. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economy and Finance in Smart-Cities)
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Article
Linking Dynamic Building Simulation with Long-Term Energy System Planning to Improve Buildings Urban Energy Planning Strategies
Smart Cities 2020, 3(4), 1242-1265; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities3040061 - 22 Oct 2020
Viewed by 1230
Abstract
The building sector is currently responsible of 40% of global final energy consumption, influencing the broader energy system in terms of new electricity and heat capacity additions, as well as distribution infrastructure reinforcement. Current building energy efficiency potential is largely untapped, especially at [...] Read more.
The building sector is currently responsible of 40% of global final energy consumption, influencing the broader energy system in terms of new electricity and heat capacity additions, as well as distribution infrastructure reinforcement. Current building energy efficiency potential is largely untapped, especially at the local level where retrofit interventions are typically enforced, neglecting their potential synergies with the entire energy system. To improve the understanding of these potential interactions, this paper proposes a methodology that links dynamic building simulation and energy planning tools at the urban scale. At first, a detailed bottom-up analysis was conducted to estimate the current and post-retrofit energy demand of the building stock. The stock analysis is further linked to a broader energy system simulation model to understand the impact of building renovation on the whole urban energy system in terms of cost, greenhouse gas emission, and primary energy consumption up to 2050. The methodology is suited to analyze the relationship between building energy demand reduction potential and clean energy sources’ deployment to shift buildings away from fossil fuels, the key priority for decarbonizing buildings. The methodology was applied to the case study city of Torino, Italy, highlighting the critical role of coupling proper building retrofit intervention with district-level heat generation strategies, such as modern district heating able to exploit low-grade heat. Being able to simulate both demand and supply future alternatives, the methodology provides a robust reference for municipalities and energy suppliers aiming at promoting efficient energy policies and targeted investments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economy and Finance in Smart-Cities)
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Perspective
Disruptive Technologies in Smart Cities: A Survey on Current Trends and Challenges
Smart Cities 2020, 3(3), 1022-1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities3030051 - 13 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1716
Abstract
This paper aims to explore the most important disruptive technologies in the development of the smart city. Every smart city is a dynamic and complex system that attracts an increasing number of people in search of the benefits of urbanisation. According to the [...] Read more.
This paper aims to explore the most important disruptive technologies in the development of the smart city. Every smart city is a dynamic and complex system that attracts an increasing number of people in search of the benefits of urbanisation. According to the United Nations, 68% of the world population will be living in cities by 2050. This creates challenges related to limited resources and infrastructure (energy, water, transportation system, etc.). To solve these problems, new and emerging technologies are created. Internet of Things, big data, blockchain, artificial intelligence, data analytics, and machine and cognitive learning are just a few examples. They generate changes in key sectors such as health, energy, transportation, education, public safety, etc. Based on a comprehensive literature review, we identified the main disruptive technologies in smart cities. Applications that integrate these technologies help cities to be smarter and offer better living conditions and easier access to products and services for residents. Disruptive technologies are generally considered key drivers in smart city progress. This paper presents these disruptive technologies, their applications in smart cities, the most important challenges and critics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economy and Finance in Smart-Cities)
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