Topical Collection "State of the Art in Analysis of Natural Products and Pharmaceuticals"

Editor

Dr. Paraskevas D. Tzanavaras
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: automation; sequential injection analysis; separation techniques (HPLC, CE); post-column derivatization; microextraction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

In general terms, “natural products” can be defined as all compounds that are synthesized/produced by living organisms (plants, animals, etc.). The importance of natural products has been recognized for thousands of years, and a considerable fraction of new drugs is still based on the discovery of natural biogenic molecules.

In the Topical Collection “State-of-the-Art in Analysis of Natural Products and Pharmaceuticals”, we welcome original research and review articles on the development and application of analytical methods in both natural product and pharmaceutical science.

Research on the analysis of natural products should ideally increase the current knowledge on the extraction, isolation, identification, structure elucidation, and quantification of bioactive compounds. All aspects of instrumental analysis that can be used as a tool to achieve these tasks are welcome. Reports on the quality control and standardization of natural products will also be considered on the basis of their significance in the field.

Analysis of pharmaceuticals, on the other hand, is an extremely broad topic ranging from quality control or raw materials to the impurity profiling of active ingredients and to bioanalytical applications. Original work on all aspects of related research is welcome. Impurity profiling and especially the identification/quantification of genotoxic impurities are of particular interest, while simple assays using HPLC should provide clear advantages from an analytical point of view in order to be processed further. Research work from industries reporting the results from real-world analytical problems is also welcome. All pharmaceutical-related analytical methods should be fully validated.

Bioanalytical methods including pharmacokinetic, bioequivalence, protein, and DNA-binding studies are welcome on the basis of analytical novelty, including sample preparation. Real-world applications (endogenous analytes or sampling from patients) are highly recommended versus demonstration through the spiking of blank biological matrices.

In all cases, novelty will be the major suitability criterion of submitted articles. Authors must therefore always address the question of how their proposed methodology compares with previously reported methods.

Dr. Paraskevas D. Tzanavaras
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural products
  • pharmaceuticals
  • automation
  • sequential injection analysis
  • separation techniques (HPLC, CE)
  • post-column derivatization
  • microextraction

Published Papers (3 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021

Article
Optimized Isolation of Safranal from Saffron by Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) and Rotatable Central Composite Design-Response Surface Methodology (RCCD-RSM)
Separations 2022, 9(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9020048 - 10 Feb 2022
Viewed by 775
Abstract
Safranal is the main aroma component of saffron stigmas. It is also a great antioxidant with known pharmacological properties and is a potent indicator for the grading and authentication of saffron. In this study, the optimum extraction conditions of safranal from saffron stigmas [...] Read more.
Safranal is the main aroma component of saffron stigmas. It is also a great antioxidant with known pharmacological properties and is a potent indicator for the grading and authentication of saffron. In this study, the optimum extraction conditions of safranal from saffron stigmas were investigated using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) and response surface methodology (RSM). A rotatable-central composite design was applied, and a linear regression model has been used for the model building. The optimized factors were as follows: sample weight (15 mg), water volume (4 mL), exposure time in the headspace (20 min), and extraction temperature (45 °C). All factors were found significant; however, extraction temperature and exposure time were the most important for the isolation of safranal. The obtained model was successfully validated with a test set of saffron samples analyzed under the optimum extraction conditions. The optimized SPME extraction conditions of safranal found in this study contribute to the efforts towards the detection of saffron authentication and adulteration. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2021

Jump to: 2022

Article
Improvement of Cucurbitacin B Content in Cucumis melo Pedicel Extracts by Biotransformation Using Recombinant β-Glucosidase
Separations 2021, 8(9), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8090138 - 01 Sep 2021
Viewed by 634
Abstract
For the efficient biotransformation of cucurbitacin B 2-o-β-d-glucoside (CuBg) to cucurbitacin B (CuB) in Cucumis melo pedicel extracts, the β-glucosidase gene bglS—consisting of 1344 bp (447 amino acids) from Streptomyces sp. RW-2—was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli [...] Read more.
For the efficient biotransformation of cucurbitacin B 2-o-β-d-glucoside (CuBg) to cucurbitacin B (CuB) in Cucumis melo pedicel extracts, the β-glucosidase gene bglS—consisting of 1344 bp (447 amino acids) from Streptomyces sp. RW-2—was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The activity of recombinant β-glucosidase with p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucoside (pNPG) as a substrate was 3.48 U/mL in a culture. Using the recombinant β-glucosidase for the biotransformation of C. melo pedicel extracts, CuBg was converted into CuB with a conversion rate of 87.6% when the concentration of CuBg was 0.973 g/L in a reaction mixtures. The concentration of CuB in C. melo pedicel extracts was improved from 13.6 to 20.2 g/L after biotransformation. The present study provides high-efficiency technology for the production of CuB from its glycoside by biotransformation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Optimum Parameters for Extracting Three Kinds of Carotenoids from Pepper Leaves by Response Surface Methodology
Separations 2021, 8(9), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations8090134 - 26 Aug 2021
Viewed by 497
Abstract
To determine the optimum parameters for extracting three carotenoids including zeaxanthin, lutein epoxide, and violaxanthin from pepper leaves by response surface methodology (RSM), a solvent of acetone and ethyl acetate (1:2) was used to extract carotenoids with four independent factors: ultrasound time (20–60 [...] Read more.
To determine the optimum parameters for extracting three carotenoids including zeaxanthin, lutein epoxide, and violaxanthin from pepper leaves by response surface methodology (RSM), a solvent of acetone and ethyl acetate (1:2) was used to extract carotenoids with four independent factors: ultrasound time (20–60 min); ratio of sample to solvent (1:12–1:4); saponification time (10–50 min); and concentration of saponification solution (KOH–methanol) (10–30%). A second-order polynomial model produced a satisfactory fitting of the experimental data with regard to zeaxanthin (R2 = 75.95%, p < 0.0197), lutein epoxide (R2 = 90.24%, p < 0.0001), and violaxanthin (R2 = 73.84%, p < 0.0809) content. The optimum joint extraction conditions of zeaxanthin, lutein epoxide, and violaxanthin were 40 min, 1:8, 32 min, and 20%, respectively. The optimal predicted contents for zeaxanthin (0.823022 µg/g DW), lutein epoxide (4.03684 µg/g dry; DW—dry weight), and violaxanthin (16.1972 µg/g DW) in extraction had little difference with the actual experimental values obtained under the optimum extraction conditions for each response: zeaxanthin (0.8118 µg/g DW), lutein epoxide (3.9497 µg/g DW), and violaxanthin (16.1590 µg/g DW), which provides a theoretical basis and method for cultivating new varieties at low temperatures and weak light resistance. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop