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Special Issue "Enzyme-Based Biosensors for Biomedical Analysis"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Giovanna Marrazza

Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: immobilization procedure of biomolecules; protein–DNA complexes; aptamer; enzymatic biosensors; carbon nanotubes; nanoparticles; nanocomposite polymers; molecular imprinted polymers; protein-polymer conjugates; thick-film technology; nanodispensing technologies; micro-flow systems
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bengi Uslu

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ankara University; 06560 Yenimahalle, Ankara, Turkey
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electrochemistry; drug analysis; redox mechanisms of drug active compounds; biosensors; validation; biological sample analysis; modified electrodes; separation techniques; spectrophotometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the years, scientists have searched for adequate methods to diagnose diseases, following the prognosis of these diseases over time, and understanding the efficiency of the treatment procedures. Biosensors, namely devices incorporating a biological sensing element connected to a transducer for converting an observed response into a measurable signal, have been developed to achieve the better diagnosis and monitoring of diseases. While there are many types of biosensors based on the biological sensing element, enzyme-based biosensors have attracted the attention of the scientific community for their distinct advantages. This type of biosensor, which combines an enzyme to a transducer in order to produce a detectible signal emerging out of a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme, have higher sensitivity and specificity as well as faster response times compared to most traditional analytical methods. Moreover, in practice, portable and cheap enzyme-based biosensors can be designed and they have been extensively used in biomedical analysis by incorporating nanomaterials, microfluidic devices and paper or lab-on-a-chip based infrastructures. This Special Issue, therefore, attempts to focus on this developing and very promising field of biosensing and gathers different studies on enzyme-based biosensors for biomedical analysis.

Prof. Dr. Giovanna Marrazza
Prof. Dr. Bengi Uslu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • enzyme-based biosensors 
  • biomedical analysis 
  • lab-on-chip 
  • point of care device
  • nanomaterials 
  • conducting polymers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Development of a Novel Enhanced Biosensor System for Real-Time Monitoring of Fish Stress Using a Self-Assembled Monolayer
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1518; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071518
Received: 17 January 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
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Abstract
Wireless biosensor systems were developed in our lab for monitoring blood glucose concentrations in fish as an indicator of fish stress. However, uniform immobilization of the enzyme on the surface of the electrode is difficult, so the sensor response is typically reduced at [...] Read more.
Wireless biosensor systems were developed in our lab for monitoring blood glucose concentrations in fish as an indicator of fish stress. However, uniform immobilization of the enzyme on the surface of the electrode is difficult, so the sensor response is typically reduced at a range of high glucose concentrations during the stress monitoring. In this study, we attempted to enhance sensor response by using a self-assembled monolayer-immobilized enzyme. Glucose oxidase was immobilized on a working electrode modified with a self-assembled monolayer. The proposed biosensor showed a good correlation between the output current and the glucose concentration range of 10–3500 mg dL−1 under an optimized working condition. The dynamic measurement range of this newly developed sensor is significantly improved, especially over a high concentration range, which helps the sensor to achieve better performance in dramatic changes in the stress response of fish. In addition, we used biological samples from test fish and obtained a good correlation coefficient between the sensor output current and the glucose concentration using a conventional method. The proposed wireless biosensor system was also applied to monitor fish stress responses in real time through different stressors and to obtain some precise data that reflect real fish stress responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Biosensors for Biomedical Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Lactamase Inhibitors on the Biosensor Penp during the Measurement of Lactam Antibiotics Concentration
Sensors 2019, 19(5), 1237; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19051237
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 20 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
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Abstract
PenP is a fluorescent biosensor of lactam antibiotics (LA). It is structurally derived from the mutant lactamase TEM-1 comprising the substitution E166C, where fluorescein is covalently linked to cysteine. The presence of LA in the medium produces a change in the intrinsic fluorescence [...] Read more.
PenP is a fluorescent biosensor of lactam antibiotics (LA). It is structurally derived from the mutant lactamase TEM-1 comprising the substitution E166C, where fluorescein is covalently linked to cysteine. The presence of LA in the medium produces a change in the intrinsic fluorescence level of the biosensor, and the integral of the fluorescence level over time correlates directly with the LA concentration. Previously, we have successfully used PenP to determine the concentration of lactam antibiotics in clinical samples. The use of lactamase inhibitors (LI) is a common strategy to enhance the effect of LA due to the inhibition of an important resistance mechanism of pathogenic microorganisms. Structurally, LI and LA share the common element of recognition of lactamases (the lactam ring), but they differ in the reversibility of the mechanism of interaction with said enzyme. Because the biological recognition domain of PenP is derived from a lactamase, LI is expected to interfere with the PenP detection capabilities. Surprisingly, this work provides evidence that the effect of LI is marginal in the determination of LA concentration mediated by PenP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Biosensors for Biomedical Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Screening and Evaluation of Lamiaceae Plant Species from South Africa with Potential Tyrosinase Activity
Sensors 2019, 19(5), 1035; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19051035
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 28 February 2019
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Abstract
South Africa is a country with a wide variety of plants that may contain excellent anti-tyrosinase inhibitors. With wide applications in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and food products, tyrosinase inhibitors have received very special attention in the recent past as a way of preventing the [...] Read more.
South Africa is a country with a wide variety of plants that may contain excellent anti-tyrosinase inhibitors. With wide applications in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and food products, tyrosinase inhibitors have received very special attention in the recent past as a way of preventing the overproduction of melanin in epidermal layers which often over time brings detrimental effects on human skin. In this present study, a fast screening method using a cyclic voltammetry technique was applied in the evaluation of methanolic extracts of twenty-five species of plants from the Lamiaceae family for anti-tyrosinase activity. Among these plants, those that showed a fast current inhibition rate at a minimum concentration when compared to a kojic acid standard were classified as having the greatest anti-tyrosinase activity. These include Salvia chamelaeagnea, S. dolomitica, Plectranthus ecklonii, P. namaensis, and P. zuluensis. The results presented herein focused in particular on providng firsthand information for further extensive research and exploration of natural product materials with anti-tyrosinase activity from South African flora for use in cosmetics, skin care and medicinal treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Biosensors for Biomedical Analysis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Latest Trends in Electrochemical Sensors for Neurotransmitters: A Review
Sensors 2019, 19(9), 2037; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19092037
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 7 April 2019 / Accepted: 25 April 2019 / Published: 30 April 2019
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Abstract
Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemical messengers which play an important role in many of the brain functions, abnormal levels being correlated with physical, psychotic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease. Therefore, their sensitive and robust detection is of great clinical [...] Read more.
Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemical messengers which play an important role in many of the brain functions, abnormal levels being correlated with physical, psychotic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease. Therefore, their sensitive and robust detection is of great clinical significance. Electrochemical methods have been intensively used in the last decades for neurotransmitter detection, outclassing more complicated analytical techniques such as conventional spectrophotometry, chromatography, fluorescence, flow injection, and capillary electrophoresis. In this manuscript, the most successful and promising electrochemical enzyme-free and enzymatic sensors for neurotransmitter detection are reviewed. Focusing on the activity of worldwide researchers mainly during the last ten years (2010–2019), without pretending to be exhaustive, we present an overview of the progress made in sensing strategies during this time. Particular emphasis is placed on nanostructured-based sensors, which show a substantial improvement of the analytical performances. This review also examines the progress made in biosensors for neurotransmitter measurements in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme-Based Biosensors for Biomedical Analysis)
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