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Special Issue "Sensors in Podiatry"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Daniel López-López
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Research, Health and Podiatry Group, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing and Podiatry, Universidade da Coruña, 150403 Ferrol, Spain
Interests: biomechanics; quality of life; shoes; pain; epidemiology; orthopedic; podiatry; prevention and promotion of the health; rehabilitation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Marta Elena Losa-Iglesias
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922 Alcorcón, Spain
Interests: health care; biomechanics; quality of life; shoes; pain; epidemiology; orthopedic; podiatry; prevention and promotion of the health; rehabilitation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. César Calvo-Lobo
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Facultad de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: ligaments; muscles; myofascial pain syndrome; musculoskeletal disorders; sports; tendons; ultrasonography
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. David Rodríguez Sanz
Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: feet; ligaments; muscles; musculoskeletal disorders; sports; tendons; ultrasonography
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Pedro Vicente Munuera Martínez
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Podiatry, Faculty of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, University of Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: Pie, Foot, Ortesis, Foot orthotics, Biomecánica, Biomechanics
Prof. Dr. Ricardo Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo
Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: feet; ligaments; muscles; musculoskeletal disorders; reliability; sports; tendons; ultrasonography; validation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Podiatry is evolving along with the advancement of sensing technologies. Advanced technologies have resulted in a range of clinical instruments, including imaging and sensing tools for the assessment, diagnosis, and control of the health and disease of both foot bones and soft musculoskeletal tissues, and are involved in procedures related to treatment planning and fabrication in preventive podiatry, orthotics and prosthetics, biomechanical analysis, and foot and ankle surgery. 

The recent advances in optical sources and detectors have unique applications for podiatry research, particularly when it comes to non-destructive testing. I would like to invite my colleagues from across the world to contribute their expertise, insights, and findings in the form of novel and original research articles and reviews for this Special Issue entitled “Sensors in Podiatry”. 

This Special Issue will cover all aspects of clinical and research applications of sensing technologies operating in any region of the electromagnetic spectrum in the field of podiatry. Special attention will be given to platforms of gait and posture devices, ultrasound machines, electromyography equipment, thermography evaluation, and other imaging techniques in the podiatry field. 

Especially we encourage the submission of interdisciplinary work and multi-country collaborative research. We welcome novel research papers using different study designs as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Prof. Dr. Marta Elena Losa-Iglesias
Prof. Dr. César Calvo-Lobo
Prof. Ricardo Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo
Prof. Pedro Vicente Munuera Martínez
Prof. Dr. Daniel López-López
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Artificial Texture Insoles and Foot Arches on Improving Arch Collapse in Flat Feet
Sensors 2020, 20(13), 3667; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133667 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
The arches of the foot play a vital role in cushioning the impact and pressure generated from ground reaction forces due to body weight. Owing to a lack of normal human arch structure, people diagnosed as having flat feet often have discomfort in [...] Read more.
The arches of the foot play a vital role in cushioning the impact and pressure generated from ground reaction forces due to body weight. Owing to a lack of normal human arch structure, people diagnosed as having flat feet often have discomfort in the soles of their feet. The results may not only cause inappropriate foot pressure distribution on the sole but also further cause foot injuries. This study heavily relies on a homemade foot pressure sensing device equipped with textured insoles of different heights and artificial arches. This was to explore the extent to which the pressure distribution of the foot in people with flat feet could be improved. A further comparison was made of the effects of using the textured insoles with different heights on two different groups of people diagnosed with flat and normal feet respectively. Sixty-five undergraduate and postgraduate volunteers were invited to receive the ink footprint test for measuring their degrees of arch index. Nine of these 65 had 2 flat feet, 3 had a left flat foot, 5 had a right flat foot, and 48 had 2 normal feet. To ensure the same number of subjects in both the control and the experimental groups, 9 of the 48 subjects who had normal feet were randomly selected. In total, 26 subjects (Male: 25, Female: 1; Age: 22 ± 1 years; height: 173.6 ± 2.5 cm; body mass: 68.3 ± 5.4 kg; BMI: 22.6 ± 1.2) were invited to participate in this foot pressure sensing insoles study. The experimental results showed that the use of textured insoles designed with different heights could not effectively improve the plantar pressure distribution and body stability in subjects with flat feet. Conversely, the use of an artificial arch effectively improved the excessive peak in pressure and poor body stability, and alleviated the problem of plantar collapse for patients with flat feet, especially in the inner part of their hallux and forefoot. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Podiatry)
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Open AccessArticle
The Validity and Reliability of a New Simple Instrument for the Measurement of First Ray Mobility
Sensors 2020, 20(8), 2207; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20082207 - 14 Apr 2020
Abstract
Several methods have been described to quantify the first ray mobility. They all have certain disadvantages (great size, sophistication, or lack of validation). The objective of this work was to study the validity and reliability of a new instrument for the measurement of [...] Read more.
Several methods have been described to quantify the first ray mobility. They all have certain disadvantages (great size, sophistication, or lack of validation). The objective of this work was to study the validity and reliability of a new instrument for the measurement of first ray mobility. Anterior-posterior radiographs were obtained from 25 normal feet and 24 hallux valgus feet, with the first ray in a neutral position, maximally dorsiflexed and maximally plantarflexed. The first ray mobility was radiographicaly measured in both groups, and was also manually examined with the new device. A cluster analysis determined whether normal and hallux valgus feet were correctly classified, and a graphic analysis of Bland-Altman was performed to compare the radiographic and manual measurement techniques. Based on the radiographs, the first ray mobility only showed significant differences in dorsiflexion between both groups (P = 0.015). First ray dorsiflexion, plantarflexion and total range of motion measured with the new device were different between both groups (P = 0.040, P = 0.011 and P = 0.006, respectively). The silhouette measure of the cohesion and separation coefficients from the cluster analysis was greater than 0.50 for the dorsiflexion, plantarflexion and total range of motion obtained from the radiographs and from the new device. The Bland-Altman graph suggested that 96% of the data presented agreement between both measurement methods. These results suggested that the new instrument was valid and reliable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Podiatry)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Different Hardness Custom Foot Insoles in the Electromyography Activity Patterns of the Thigh and Hip Muscles during Motorcycling Sport: A Crossover Study
Sensors 2020, 20(6), 1551; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20061551 - 11 Mar 2020
Abstract
Nowadays, the use of insoles in sport practice have been recognized to decrease the foot and lower limb injury patterns. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of four types of hardness insoles (HI) in the activity patterns of the [...] Read more.
Nowadays, the use of insoles in sport practice have been recognized to decrease the foot and lower limb injury patterns. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of four types of hardness insoles (HI) in the activity patterns of the hip and thigh muscles (HTM) in motoriders during motorcycling sport. The study was a crossover trial. Subjects were elite motoriders. The mean age was 33 ± 5.14 years. Electromyography (EMG) of hip and thigh muscles (HTM) data was registered via surface while subjects were riding on an elite motorcycle simulator. Subjects had to complete different tests with randomly hardest insoles (HI): 1: only polypropylene (58° D Shore); 2: Polypropylene (58° D Shore) with selective aluminium in hallux and metatarsal heads (60 HB Brinell hardness); 3: Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) (52° A Shore); and finally, 4: Ordinary EVA (25° A Shore) as the control. EMG patterns of the HTM, riding on an elite motorcycle simulator, showed the lowest peak amplitude with the insoles with polypropylene and selective aluminium. Using the hardest insoles in our study (selective aluminium) the EMG amplitude peaks decreased in all HTM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors in Podiatry)
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