sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Optomechanical Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Ramos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bionanomechanics Lab, Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid-CSIC (IMM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain
Interests: optomechanics; plasmonics; photonic crystals; nanomechanical sensing
Dr. Eduardo Gil
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bionanomechanics Lab, Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid-CSIC (IMM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain
Interests: optomechanics; nanomechanical sensing; biosensing; MEMS and NEMS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although light–matter interactions have been studied for the last fifty years, optomechanics (the interplay of optical and mechanical modes of micro-nano structures) has gained considerable interest over the last decade. This emerging field promises a wide range of applications, not only in fundamental science, e.g., in quantum fields and fluid dynamics, but also in biological research, medical diagnosis, and environmental monitoring.

This Special Issue aims to gather the community and highlight the relevance of optomechanics in the sensing field. We invite manuscripts for this forthcoming Special Issue on all aspects pertinent to optomechanical sensing, such as development, testing, and modeling of any kind of optomechanical sensors, advances in fabrication, etc.

We look forward to and welcome your participation in this Special Issue. Both experimental and theoretical contributions are welcome. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Biosensing and environmental analysis
  • Force Sensing
  • Thermometry
  • Quantum applications
  • Optofluidics and Fluid dynamics
  • Fabrication of novel optomechanical platforms
  • New optomechanical sensing schemes

Dr. Daniel Ramos
Dr. Eduardo Gil
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optomechanics
  • Biosensing
  • Environmental Analysis
  • Force Sensing
  • Nanofabrication
  • Quantum Applications
  • OptoMechanoFluidics

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Coherent Optical Transduction of Suspended Microcapillary Resonators for Multi-Parameter Sensing Applications
Sensors 2019, 19(23), 5069; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235069 - 20 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Characterization of micro and nanoparticle mass has become increasingly relevant in a wide range of fields, from materials science to drug development. The real-time analysis of complex mixtures in liquids demands very high mass sensitivity and high throughput. One of the most promising [...] Read more.
Characterization of micro and nanoparticle mass has become increasingly relevant in a wide range of fields, from materials science to drug development. The real-time analysis of complex mixtures in liquids demands very high mass sensitivity and high throughput. One of the most promising approaches for real-time measurements in liquid, with an excellent mass sensitivity, is the use of suspended microchannel resonators, where a carrier liquid containing the analytes flows through a nanomechanical resonator while tracking its resonance frequency shift. To this end, an extremely sensitive mechanical displacement technique is necessary. Here, we have developed an optomechanical transduction technique to enhance the mechanical displacement sensitivity of optically transparent hollow nanomechanical resonators. The capillaries have been fabricated by using a thermal stretching technique, which allows to accurately control the final dimensions of the device. We have experimentally demonstrated the light coupling into the fused silica capillary walls and how the evanescent light coming out from the silica interferes with the surrounding electromagnetic field distribution, a standing wave sustained by the incident laser and the reflected power from the substrate, modulating the reflectivity. The enhancement of the displacement sensitivity due to this interferometric modulation (two orders of magnitude better than compared with previous accomplishments) has been theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanical Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Multipurpose Polymer Bragg Grating-Based Optomechanical Sensor Pad
Sensors 2019, 19(19), 4101; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19194101 - 23 Sep 2019
Abstract
Flexible epoxy waveguide Bragg gratings are fabricated on a low-modulus TPX™ polymethylpentene polyolefin substrate for an easy to manufacture and low-cost optomechanical sensor pad providing exceedingly multipurpose application potentials. Rectangular EpoCore negative resist strip waveguides are formed employing standard UV mask lithography. Highly [...] Read more.
Flexible epoxy waveguide Bragg gratings are fabricated on a low-modulus TPX™ polymethylpentene polyolefin substrate for an easy to manufacture and low-cost optomechanical sensor pad providing exceedingly multipurpose application potentials. Rectangular EpoCore negative resist strip waveguides are formed employing standard UV mask lithography. Highly persistent Bragg gratings are inscribed directly into the channel waveguides by permanently modifying the local refractive indices through a well-defined KrF excimer laser irradiated +1/-1 order phase mask. The reproducible and vastly versatile sensing capabilities of this easy-to-apply optomechanical sensor pad are demonstrated in the form of an optical pickup for acoustic instruments, a broadband optical accelerometer, and a biomedical vital sign sensor monitoring both respiration and pulse at the same time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanical Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A New Design of an MOEMS Gyroscope Based on a WGM Microdisk Resonator
Sensors 2019, 19(12), 2798; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19122798 - 21 Jun 2019
Abstract
In this paper, we present a new design for a micro-opto-electro-mechanical (MOEMS) gyroscope based on a whispering-gallery mode (WGM) microdisk resonator and MEMS resonator. The mechanical characteristics, frequency split, and quality factor (Q) of the MEMS resonator; the optical characteristics, Q value, and [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present a new design for a micro-opto-electro-mechanical (MOEMS) gyroscope based on a whispering-gallery mode (WGM) microdisk resonator and MEMS resonator. The mechanical characteristics, frequency split, and quality factor (Q) of the MEMS resonator; the optical characteristics, Q value, and coupling regimes of the WGM resonator; and the coupling between the two resonators were analyzed. Its operation principle—the transformation process from angular velocity to the resonance wavelength of the WGM resonator—is presented at same time. Next, the analysis conclusions were validated with the help of simulations in ANSYS and FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) Solutions. Afterwards, some key specifications were estimated based on the results of simulations. Lastly, the fabrication process is detailed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanical Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Highly Sensitive Charge Sensor Based on Atom-Assisted High-Order Sideband Generation in a Hybrid Optomechanical System
Sensors 2018, 18(11), 3833; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18113833 - 08 Nov 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Realizing highly sensitive charge sensors is of fundamental importance in physics, and may find applications in metrology, electronic tunnel imaging, and engineering technology. With the development of nanophotonics, cavity optomechanics with Coulomb interaction provides a powerful platform to explore new options for the [...] Read more.
Realizing highly sensitive charge sensors is of fundamental importance in physics, and may find applications in metrology, electronic tunnel imaging, and engineering technology. With the development of nanophotonics, cavity optomechanics with Coulomb interaction provides a powerful platform to explore new options for the precision measurement of charges. In this work, a method of realizing a highly sensitive charge sensor based on atom-assisted high-order sideband generation in a hybrid optomechanical system is proposed. The advantage of this scheme is that the sideband cutoff order and the charge number satisfy a monotonically increasing relationship, which is more sensitive than the atom-free case discussed previously. Calculations show that the sensitivity of the charge sensor in our scheme is improved by about 25 times. In particular, our proposed charge sensor can operate in low power conditions and extremely weak charge measurement environments. Furthermore, phase-dependent effects between the sideband generation and Coulomb interaction are also discussed in detail. Beyond their fundamental scientific significance, our work is an important step toward measuring individual charge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanical Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop