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Special Issue "Optical Sensing Based on Microscale Devices"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tarik Bourouina

ESIEE/Esycom-Lab, Cité Descartes 2 Bd Blaise Pascal, 93162 Noisy-le-Grand, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: water research; MEMS; micro-optics, nanotechnology, optical sensors
Guest Editor
Dr. Yasser M. Sabry

Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ain-Shams University, 1 Elsarayat St., Abbassia, Cairo 11517, Egypt
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microsystems; photonics; fiber sensors; optofluidics; gas sensing; optical IoT

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are very pleased to introduce this Special Issue on “Optical Sensing Based on Microscale Devices”.

Optical sensing outperforms electrical and chemical sensing in terms of its high accuracy, long-term stability, no interaction with the analyte, and high performance under harsh conditions. Optical sensors based on microscale devices are in the form of micro-optics, which are optical components and systems that are a few micrometers to a few millimeters in size. These include, but are not limited to, tunable micro lenses, micron-core and photonic crystal optical fibers, silicon photonics, micro mirrors and optofluidics. Together with the integration of movable structures within a chip, this leads to the photonic MEMS/NEMS, adding more degrees of freedom and functionalities to sensing systems. In fact, sensing mechanisms based on microscale devices are gaining more and more interest due to the high performance offered, together with the reasonable cost, making use of different micromachining technologies. In addition, it offers the possibility of measuring in confined environments and provides the compact form and low power consumption needed for the wireless sensor network and IoT applications. The detection of physical quantities, chemical matter and biological species are possible and the common sensing mechanisms are refractive index, optical path, strain, florescence and vibrational spectroscopy sensing. The most recent applications include, but not limited to, handheld spectrometers, infrared gas sensors, refractometers, pressure sensors, structural health monitoring, water purity sensors and non-invasive biomedical sensors.

Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks to highlight research papers, short communications, and review articles that focus on novel methodological, technological, microsystem optimization and engineering developments in the area of “Optical Sensing Based on Microscale Devices”.

Prof. Dr. Tarik Bourouina
Dr. Yasser M. Sabry
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Micro-scale resonators
  • IR sensors
  • Micro-spectrometers
  • Silicon photonics
  • Optical MEMS
  • Refractometers
  • Optofluidics
  • Optical biosensing
  • FBG sensors
  • PCF sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle On-Channel Integrated Optofluidic Pressure Sensor with Optically Boosted Sensitivity
Sensors 2019, 19(4), 944; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19040944
Received: 21 January 2019 / Revised: 17 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 23 February 2019
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Abstract
A novel optofluidic sensor that measures the local pressure of the fluid inside a microfluidic channel is presented. It can be integrated directly on-channel and requires no additional layers in fabrication. The detection can be accomplished at a single wavelength; and thereby, only [...] Read more.
A novel optofluidic sensor that measures the local pressure of the fluid inside a microfluidic channel is presented. It can be integrated directly on-channel and requires no additional layers in fabrication. The detection can be accomplished at a single wavelength; and thereby, only a single laser diode and a single photodetector are required. This renders the sensor to be compact, cheap and easy to fabricate. Basically, the sensor consisted of a Fabry–Pérot microresonator enclosing the fluidic channel. A novel structure of the Fabry–Pérot was employed to achieve high-quality factor, that was essential to facilitate the single wavelength detection. The enhanced performance was attributed to the curved mirrors and cylindrical lenses used to avoid light diffraction loss. The presented sensor was fabricated and tested with deionized water liquid and shown to exhibit a sensitivity up to 12.46 dBm/bar, and a detection limit of 8.2 mbar. Numerical simulations are also presented to evaluate the mechanical–fluidic performance of the device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensing Based on Microscale Devices)
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Open AccessArticle In-Fiber Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Based on Three-Core Fiber for Measurement of Directional Bending
Sensors 2019, 19(1), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19010205
Received: 19 November 2018 / Revised: 20 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 8 January 2019
PDF Full-text (2669 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A highly sensitive directional bending sensor based on a three-core fiber (TCF) Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is presented in this study. This MZI-based bending sensor was fabricated by fusion-splicing a section of TCF between two single-mode fibers (SMF) with core-offset. Due to the location [...] Read more.
A highly sensitive directional bending sensor based on a three-core fiber (TCF) Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is presented in this study. This MZI-based bending sensor was fabricated by fusion-splicing a section of TCF between two single-mode fibers (SMF) with core-offset. Due to the location of the core in the TCF, a bend applied to the TCF-based MZI led to an elongation or shortening of the core, which makes the sensor suitable for directional bending measurement. To analyze the bending characteristics, two types of TCF-based sensors, with the fusion-spliced core located at different positions between the SMFs, were investigated. A swept source was employed in the measurement technique. The experimental results showed that, for the two types of sensors in this setup, the bending sensitivities of the two sensors were 15.36 nm/m−1 and 3.11 nm/m−1 at the bending direction of 0°, and −20.48 nm/m−1 and −5.29 nm/m−1 at the bending direction of 180°. The temperature sensitivities of the two sensors were 0.043 nm/°C and 0.041 nm/°C, respectively. The proposed sensors are compact, versatile, inexpensive to fabricate, and are expected to have potential applications in biomedical sensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Sensing Based on Microscale Devices)
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