sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Magnetoelectric Sensors: Theory, Design and Application"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020) | Viewed by 4688

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mirza Bichurin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Yaroslav-the-Wise Novgorod State University, Veliky Novgorod, Russia
Interests: solid-state physics; magnetoelectric effect; magnetic resonance; magnetoelectric devices; microwave technics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Yaojin Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, China
Interests: magnetoelectric, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, flexible electronic
Prof. Roman Petrov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Yaroslav-the-Wise Novgorod State University, Veliky Novgorod, Russia
Interests: magnetoelectric current sensors, magnetoelectric position sensors, magnetoelectric bio sensing, sensors design, integrated sensors and transducers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last 20 years, there has been an active and comprehensive study of magnetoelectric (ME) composites due to their multifunctionality and possible new applications in science and technology. Some properties of ME composites, such as their direct and inverse ME effects associated with the change of electric polarization/magnetization in response to external magnetic/electric fields, have shown wide possibilities for their practical application.

One of the first proposed applications of ME composites was a magnetic field sensor [1]. Then, after more studies that achieved a pico-Tesla sensitivity of a sensor at room temperature [2,3], the number of works on ME sensors increased dramatically. Research on ME sensors was devoted to the study of various physical parameters in a wide frequency range, including microwaves and optics.

This Special Issue of Sensors will be dedicated to highlight the theory, design, and application of ME sensors, describing the main directions of their development in order  to summarize and  provide recommendations for future research.

[1] Bichurin, M.I.; Petrov, V.M.; Petrov, R.V.; Kiliba, Y.V.; Bukashev, F.I.; Smirnov, A.Y.; Eliseev, D.N. Magnetoelectric sensor of magnetic field. Ferroelectrics 2002, 280, pp. 199–202.
[2]  Zhai, J.; Xing, Z.; Dong, S.; Li, J-F.; Viehland, D. Detection of pico-Tesla  magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2006, 88, 062510.
[3] Wang, Y,; Gray, D.; Berry, D.; Gao, J.; Li, M.; Li, J-F.; Viehland, D. An extremely low equivalent magnetic noise magnetoelectric sensor. Adv. Mater. 2011, 23, pp. 4111–4114.

Prof. Dr. Mirza Bichurin
Dr. Yaojin Wang
Prof. Dr. Roman Petrov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Magnetoelectric effect
  • Magnetostrictive and piezoelectric components
  • Magnetoelectric magnetic field sensors
  • Magnetoelectric current sensors
  • Magnetoelectric position sensors
  • Magnetoelectric microwave sensors
  • Magnetoelectric optic sensors
  • Magnetoelectric bio sensing
  • Noise control and suppression
  • Sensors design
  • Integrated sensors and transducers

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Self-Biased Bidomain LiNbO3/Ni/Metglas Magnetoelectric Current Sensor
Sensors 2020, 20(24), 7142; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20247142 - 13 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1052
Abstract
The article is devoted to the theoretical and experimental study of a magnetoelectric (ME) current sensor based on a gradient structure. It is known that the use of gradient structures in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric composites makes it possible to create a self-biased structure by replacing [...] Read more.
The article is devoted to the theoretical and experimental study of a magnetoelectric (ME) current sensor based on a gradient structure. It is known that the use of gradient structures in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric composites makes it possible to create a self-biased structure by replacing an external magnetic field with an internal one, which significantly reduces the weight, power consumption and dimensions of the device. Current sensors based on a gradient bidomain structure LiNbO3 (LN)/Ni/Metglas with the following layer thicknesses: lithium niobate—500 μm, nickel—10 μm, Metglas—29 μm, operate on a linear section of the working characteristic and do not require the bias magnetic field. The main characteristics of a contactless ME current sensor: its current range measures up to 10 A, it has a sensitivity of 0.9 V/A, its current consumption is not more than 2.5 mA, and its linearity is maintained to an accuracy of 99.8%. Some additional advantages of a bidomain lithium niobate-based current sensor are the increased sensitivity of the device due to the use of the bending mode in the electromechanical resonance region and the absence of a lead component in the device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetoelectric Sensors: Theory, Design and Application)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Finite Element Solutions for Magnetic Field Problems in Terfenol-D Transducers
Sensors 2020, 20(10), 2808; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20102808 - 15 May 2020
Viewed by 1038
Abstract
An appropriate magnetic design helps ensure that the Terfenol-D (Terbium- Dysprosium-Iron alloy) rods in giant magnetostrictive transducers have the perfect magnetostriction ability. To determine the optimum Terfenol-D rod state, a segmented stack configuration comprised by the Terfenol-D rods and NdFeB (neodymium-iron-boron) permanent magnets [...] Read more.
An appropriate magnetic design helps ensure that the Terfenol-D (Terbium- Dysprosium-Iron alloy) rods in giant magnetostrictive transducers have the perfect magnetostriction ability. To determine the optimum Terfenol-D rod state, a segmented stack configuration comprised by the Terfenol-D rods and NdFeB (neodymium-iron-boron) permanent magnets is presented. The bias magnetic field distributions simulated through the finite element method indicate that the segmented stack configuration is one effective way to produce the desired bias magnetic field. Particularly for long stacks, establishing a majority of domain to satisfy the desired bias magnetic field range is feasible. On the other hand, the eddy current losses of Terfenol-D rods are also the crucial to their magnetostriction ability. To reduce eddy current losses, the configuration with digital slots in the Terfenol-D rods is presented. The induced eddy currents and the losses are estimated. The simulations reveal that the digital slots configuration decreases the eddy current losses by 78.5% compared to the same size Terfenol-D rod with only a hole. A Terfenol-D transducer prototype has been manufactured using a Terfenol-D rod with a mechanical prestress of about 10 MPa and a bias magnetic field of about 42 kA/m. Its maximum transmitting current response of 185.4 dB at 3.75 kHz indicates its practicability for application as an underwater projector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetoelectric Sensors: Theory, Design and Application)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Letter
A Magnetoelectric Automotive Crankshaft Position Sensor
Sensors 2020, 20(19), 5494; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20195494 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 992
Abstract
The paper is devoted to the possibility of using magnetoelectric materials for the production of a crankshaft position sensor for automobiles. The composite structure, consisting of a PZT or LiNbO3 piezoelectric with a size of 20 mm × 5 mm × 0.5 [...] Read more.
The paper is devoted to the possibility of using magnetoelectric materials for the production of a crankshaft position sensor for automobiles. The composite structure, consisting of a PZT or LiNbO3 piezoelectric with a size of 20 mm × 5 mm × 0.5 mm, and plates of the magnetostrictive material Metglas of the appropriate size were used as a sensitive element. The layered structure was made from a bidomain lithium niobate monocrystal with a Y + 128° cut and amorphous metal of Metglas. Various combinations of composite structures are also investigated; for example, asymmetric structures using a layer of copper and aluminum. The output characteristics of these structures are compared in the resonant and non-resonant modes. It is shown that the value of the magnetoelectric resonant voltage coefficient was 784 V/(cm·Oe), and the low-frequency non-resonant magnetoelectric coefficient for the magnetoelectric element was about 3 V/(cm·Oe). The principle of operation of the position sensor and the possibility of integration into automotive systems, using the CAN bus, are examined in detail. To obtain reliable experimental results, a special stand was assembled on the basis of the SKAD-1 installation. The studies showed good results and a high prospect for the use of magnetoelectric sensors as position sensors and, in particular, of a vehicle’s crankshaft position sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetoelectric Sensors: Theory, Design and Application)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Letter
Estimation of the Intrinsic Power Efficiency in Magnetoelectric Laminates Using Temperature Measurements
Sensors 2020, 20(11), 3332; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113332 - 11 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1032
Abstract
Magnetoelectric (ME) power efficiency is a more important property than the ME voltage or the current coefficients for power conversion applications. This paper introduces an analytical model that describes the relation between the external magnetic field and the power efficiency in layered ME [...] Read more.
Magnetoelectric (ME) power efficiency is a more important property than the ME voltage or the current coefficients for power conversion applications. This paper introduces an analytical model that describes the relation between the external magnetic field and the power efficiency in layered ME composites. It is a two-phase model. The first fragment establishes the expression between the magnetic field strength and the temperature increase within an operating period. It uses a magneto-elasto-electric equivalent circuit model that was developed by Dong et al. Following previous investigations; the main loss source is the mechanical power dissipation. The second fragment links the power efficiency and the temperature increase in a heat-balanced system. This method is generally used by researchers in the piezoelectric field. The analytical model and the experimental data shows that the decrease of the power efficiency in a laminated composite is between 5% and 10% for a power density of 10 W/in3 (0.61 W/cm3) to 30 W/in3 (1.83 W/cm3). The failure mechanism/process of ME composites under high power density can be estimated/monitored by the proposed method for ME composites in practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetoelectric Sensors: Theory, Design and Application)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop