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Special Issue "Luminescent/Colorimetric Probes and Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luis Crovetto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Granada, Department of Physical Chemistry, Granada, Spain
Interests: fluorescence; FLIM; photochemistry; photobiology
Dr. Franco M. Cabrerizo
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Argentinian National Research Council, CONICET and National University of General San Martín, UNSAM, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Interests: photochemistry; photobiology; luminescence; reactive oxygen species; targeted drug delivery; photovoltaic solar cells
Dr. Juan Antonio González Vera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidad de Granada, Department of Physical Chemistry, Granada, Spain
Interests: luminescence; probes; sensors; chemical biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recognition of environmentally and, especially, biologically relevant species such asanions, cations, thiols, and essential cellular components to detect diseases and so on, has been an important area of research in recent years. Luminescent and colorimetric probes as sensors have attracted much attention because of their advantages, such as their high selectivity and sensitivity, non-destruction of the sample, prompt detection of analytes, low-cost, simplicity, and naked-eye detection (in the case of colorimetric probes).

Compared with other analytical tools, fluorescent and colorimetric probes have made enormous progress during recent decades. For example, in the biological field, where imaging plays a big role, recent progress is focussed on near IR (NIR) and two-photon fluorescent probes, as well as on luminescent long-wavelength probes, because of the low scattering of excitation and emission light, low levels of autofluorescence in most biological systems, and less disturbance and photodamage caused to cells and living organisms.

This Special Issue aims at presenting the latest technologies and methodologies that have been developed in fluorescence and colorimetric  fields. The included topics are as follows:

  • Colorimetric/luminescent sensors towards metal cations, anions, and biomolecules
  • Fluorescent biosensors
  • Internal charge transfer (ICT)-based fluorescent sensors
  • Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based fluorescent sensors
  • Excited-state intra-/extra-molecular proton transfer (ESPT)-based fluorescent sensors
  • Aggregation-induced enhancement (AIE)-based fluorescent sensors
  • Photo-induced electron transfer (PET)-based fluorescent sensors
  • Chelation-enhancedfluorescentsensors (CHEF)

Dr. Luis Crovetto
Dr.Franco M. Cabrerizo
Dr.Juan Antonio González Vera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A GSH Fluorescent Probe with a Large Stokes Shift and Its Application in Living Cells
Sensors 2019, 19(24), 5348; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19245348 (registering DOI) - 04 Dec 2019
Abstract
Intracellular GSH is the most abundant non-protein biothiol and acts as a central antioxidant to defend against aging toxins and radicals. Meanwhile abnormal level of intracellular GSH concentration is directly related to some diseases. In this case, detecting intracellular GSH rapidly and sensitively [...] Read more.
Intracellular GSH is the most abundant non-protein biothiol and acts as a central antioxidant to defend against aging toxins and radicals. Meanwhile abnormal level of intracellular GSH concentration is directly related to some diseases. In this case, detecting intracellular GSH rapidly and sensitively is of great significance. We synthesize a simple fluorescent probe (named GP) which can discriminate GSH from Cys (cysteine) or Hcy (homocysteine) and presents a 50-fold fluorescence increasing. The response time of GP to GSH was only 5 min and the product GO (the product of GP after reacting with GSH) after reacting with GSH possesses a larger Stokes shift for 135 nm than that in reported work. Probe GP can detect intracellular effectively and shows obvious yellow fluorescence. Briefly, probe GP can detect intracellular GSH rapidly and effectively both in vitro and in living cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Luminescent/Colorimetric Probes and Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
A Quantum Dot-Based FLIM Glucose Nanosensor
Sensors 2019, 19(22), 4992; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19224992 - 16 Nov 2019
Abstract
In the last few years, quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles have been employed for bioimaging and sensing due to their excellent optical features. Most studies have used photoluminescence (PL) intensity-based techniques, which have some drawbacks, especially when working with nanoparticles in intracellular media, such [...] Read more.
In the last few years, quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles have been employed for bioimaging and sensing due to their excellent optical features. Most studies have used photoluminescence (PL) intensity-based techniques, which have some drawbacks, especially when working with nanoparticles in intracellular media, such as fluctuations in the excitation power, fluorophore concentration dependence, or interference from cell autofluorescence. Some of those limitations can be overcome with the use of time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) techniques. In this work, CdSe/ZnS QDs with long decay times were modified with aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) to achieve QD-APBA conjugates, which can act as glucose nanosensors. The attachment of the boronic acid moiety on the surface of the nanoparticle quenched the PL average lifetime of the QDs. When glucose bonded to the boronic acid, the PL was recovered and its lifetime was enhanced. The nanosensors were satisfactorily applied to the detection of glucose into MDA-MB-231 cells with FLIM. The long PL lifetimes of the QD nanoparticles made them easily discernible from cell autofluorescence, thereby improving selectivity in their sensing applications. Since the intracellular levels of glucose are related to the metabolic status of cancer cells, the proposed nanosensors could potentially be used in cancer diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Luminescent/Colorimetric Probes and Sensors)
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