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Special Issue "Fluorescence Based Biosensing Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Akio Kuroda
Website
Guest Editor
Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530, Japan
Interests: Fluorescence; Luminescence; Luciferase; Protein immobilization; Protein/peptide probes; Inorganic surface; Enzymatic sensors; Point-of-care testing; On-site detection; Microscopic analysis; Extracellular vesicles; Exosome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fluorescence-based biosensing has been applied in various fields such as medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and inspection for food safety. Fluorescence detection is based on the use of fluorophores that emit light when excited by light of a shorter wavelength. In the simplest enzymatic fluorescence-based biosensing, an increase in the fluorescence intensity, resulting from the enzymatic conversion of a fluorogenic substrate to a fluorophore, is measured. Nowadays, numerous parameters besides the intensity, such as fluorescence anisotropy, decay time, energy transfer, and quenching have been explored in fluorescence-based biosensing. Aggregation-induced emission is a novel photophysical phenomenon which offers a new platform of fluorescence application. These fluorescence signals can also be used to monitor dynamic intracellular events of protein conformational changes upon protein-protein or protein-target interaction. Thus, fluorescence-based biosensing can be exploited to develop high-throughput screening for drug discovery. On the other hand, fluorescent labeling of a specific binder (e.g., antibodies or proteins) to a target allows the use of fluorescent microscopy, which has numerous advantages compared to other kinds of optical and even electron microscopy. The development of fluorescent specific probes could expand the possibilities of biosensing capabilities. This Special Issue aims to present the wide range of exciting applications using the latest technologies and methodologies developed in fluorescence-based biosensing.

Prof. Akio Kuroda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fluorescence-based biosensing
  • Medical diagnostics
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Inspection for food safety
  • Drug discovery
  • Fluorescence anisotropy
  • Fluorescence energy transfer
  • Quenching
  • Aggregation-induced emission
  • Fluorescent microscopy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessLetter
Novel Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunochromatography Paper-Based Sensor with Signal Amplification Strategy for Detection of Deoxynivalenol
Sensors 2020, 20(22), 6577; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20226577 - 18 Nov 2020
Abstract
Immunoassay has the advantages of high sensitivity, high specificity, and simple operation, and has been widely used in the detection of mycotoxins. For several years, time-resolved fluorescence immunochromatography (TRFIA) paper-based sensors have attracted much attention as a simple and low-cost field detection technology. [...] Read more.
Immunoassay has the advantages of high sensitivity, high specificity, and simple operation, and has been widely used in the detection of mycotoxins. For several years, time-resolved fluorescence immunochromatography (TRFIA) paper-based sensors have attracted much attention as a simple and low-cost field detection technology. However, a traditional TRFIA paper-based sensor is based on antibody labeling, which cannot easily meet the current detection requirements. A second antibody labeling method was used to amplify the fluorescence signal and improve the detection sensitivity. Polystyrene fluorescent microspheres were combined with sheep anti-mouse IgG to prepare fluorescent probes (Eu-IgGs). After the probe fully reacted with the antibody (Eu-IgGs-Abs) in the sample cell, it was deployed on the paper-based sensor using chromatography. Eu-IgGs-Abs that were not bound to the target were captured on the T-line, while those that were bound were captured on the C-line. The paper-based sensor reflected the corresponding fluorescence intensity change. Because a single molecule of the deoxynivalenol antibody could bind to multiple Eu-IgGs, this method could amplify the fluorescence signal intensity on the unit antibody and improve the detection sensitivity. The working standard curve of the sensor was established under the optimum working conditions. It showed the lower limit of detection and higher recovery rate when it was applied to actual samples and compared with other methods. This sensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, good accuracy, and good specificity, saving the amount of antibody consumed and being suitable for rapid field detection of deoxynivalenol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Biosensing Applications)
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