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Special Issue "BioMolecular Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Soma Dhakal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
Interests: multiplexed sensing; protein–DNA interaction; protein–protein interaction; biomakers; DNA conformational dynamics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomolecular sensing has become a powerful tool in clinical diagnosis, assessment of food quality, forensic analysis, and many more. A myraid of techniques have been developed over the last two decades for a sensitive detection of intended targets, such as small molecules and biomarkers in an increasingly complex setting. Nevertheless, the biosensing field is thriving for more sensitive and specific techniques with no false postitives/negatives for a reliable monitoring of biomarkers in physiological conditions. In this Special Issue on “BioMolecular Sensors”, we welcome original research articles pertaining to biomolecular sensing applied to both the in vitro and in vivo settings. Research articles demonstrating a multiplexed, high-throughput, or ultra-sensitive detection of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and protein biomarkers will be given a higher priority. Please refer to the Keywords below for determining the suitability of your manuscript for this issue. Articles with a high level of scientific rigor and demonstrated reproducibility and specificity will be considered for peer review. Please contact our editorial office (information is provided below) for questions.

Dr. Soma Dhakal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • DNA/RNA/miRNA/peptide/protein/enzyme/metabolite detection
  • Nanopore/microfluidic/quantum dots/paper-based/nanoparticle-based sensing
  • Single-molecule/spectroscopic/electrochemical/mechanical sensing
  • Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)
  • Advancing sensitivity/specificity levels
  • Forensic analysis
  • Ultra-sensitive detection

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Signaling Response to Transient Redox Stress in Human Isolated T Cells: Molecular Sensor Role of Syk Kinase and Functional Involvement of IL2 Receptor and L-Selectine
Sensors 2020, 20(2), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020466 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are central effectors of inflammation and play a key role in cell signaling. Previous reports have described an association between oxidative events and the modulation of innate immunity. However, the role of redox signaling in adaptive immunity is still [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are central effectors of inflammation and play a key role in cell signaling. Previous reports have described an association between oxidative events and the modulation of innate immunity. However, the role of redox signaling in adaptive immunity is still not well understood. This work is based on a novel investigation of diamide, a specific oxidant of sulfhydryl groups, and it is the first performed in purified T cell tyrosine phosphorylation signaling. Our data show that ex vivo T cells respond to –SH group oxidation with a distinctive tyrosine phosphorylation response and that these events elicit specific cellular responses. The expression of two essential T-cell receptors, CD25 and CD62L, and T-cell cytokine release is also affected in a specific way. Experiments with Syk inhibitors indicate a major contribution of this kinase in these phenomena. This pilot work confirms the presence of crosstalk between oxidation of cysteine residues and tyrosine phosphorylation changes, resulting in a series of functional events in freshly isolated T cells. Our experiments show a novel role of Syk inhibitors in applying their anti-inflammatory action through the inhibition of a ROS-generated reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMolecular Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Real-Time Optical Detection of Isoleucine in Living Cells through a Genetically-Encoded Nanosensor
Sensors 2020, 20(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20010146 - 25 Dec 2019
Abstract
Isoleucine is one of the branched chain amino acids that plays a major role in the energy metabolism of human beings and animals. However, detailed investigation of specific receptors for isoleucine has not been carried out because of the non-availability of a tool [...] Read more.
Isoleucine is one of the branched chain amino acids that plays a major role in the energy metabolism of human beings and animals. However, detailed investigation of specific receptors for isoleucine has not been carried out because of the non-availability of a tool that can monitor the metabolic flux of this amino acid in live cells. This study presents a novel genetically-encoded nanosensor for real-time monitoring of isoleucine in living cells. This nanosensor was developed by sandwiching a periplasmic binding protein (LivJ) of E. coli between a fluorescent protein pair, ECFP (Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein), and Venus. The sensor, named GEII (Genetically Encoded Isoleucine Indicator), was pH stable, isoleucine-specific, and had a binding affinity (Kd) of 63 ± 6 μM. The GEII successfully performed real-time monitoring of isoleucine in bacterial and yeast cells, thereby, establishing its bio-compatibility in monitoring isoleucine in living cells. As a further enhancement, in silico random mutagenesis was carried out to identify a set of viable mutations, which were subsequently experimentally verified to create a library of affinity mutants with a significantly expanded operating range (96 nM–1493 μM). In addition to its applicability in understanding the underlying functions of receptors of isoleucine in metabolic regulation, the GEII can also be used for metabolic engineering of bacteria for enhanced production of isoleucine in animal feed industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMolecular Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Optical Thickness-Encoded Suspension Array for High-Throughput Multiplexed Gene Detection
Sensors 2019, 19(24), 5425; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19245425 - 09 Dec 2019
Abstract
We proposed a coding and decoding method of suspension array (SA) based on micro-quartz pieces (MQPs) with different optical thicknesses. The capture probes (cDNA) were grafted onto the surfaces of MQPs and specifically recognized and combined with the partial sequence of the target [...] Read more.
We proposed a coding and decoding method of suspension array (SA) based on micro-quartz pieces (MQPs) with different optical thicknesses. The capture probes (cDNA) were grafted onto the surfaces of MQPs and specifically recognized and combined with the partial sequence of the target DNA (tDNA) to form a MQP-cDNA-tDNA complex. Quantum dot-labeled signal probes were then used to specifically recognize and bind another portion of the tDNA in the complex to form a double-probe sandwich structure. This optical thickness-encoded SA can be decoded and detected by a dual-wavelength digital holographic phase fluorescence microscope system. We conducted a series of DNA molecule detection experiments by using this encoding method. Control experiments confirmed the specificity of optical thickness-encoded SA in DNA detection. The concentration gradient experiments then demonstrated the response of the MQPs based SA to analyte concentration. Finally, we used the encoding method to detect three types of DNA in a single sample and confirmed the feasibility of the proposed optical thickness-encoded SA in multiplexed DNA detection. The detection results are stable, and the detection exhibits high specificity and good repeatability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMolecular Sensors)
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