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Special Issue "Biomedical Sensors-Recent Advances and Future Challenges"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. James F. Rusling
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, U-60 and Department of Surgery and Neag Cancer Center (Health Center) 55 N. Eagleville Rd., University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060, USA
Interests: biomedical diagostics, bioelectrochemistry; bioanalytical chemistry; biosensors and arrays; genotoxicity analysia; electrochemical catalysis; computer data analysis, automation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is devoted to original peer-reviewed papers covering all aspects of biomedical sensors. It is focussed on biomedical sensors, including source and detection technologies for the study, treatment, and prevention of various diseases and injuries; biomedical sensor design and fabrication, performance, processing approaches, and applications; new developments and recent improvements in designs; and the electronics, data processing, and materials of biomedical sensors. The articles should address the most recent advances and future perspectives and challenges in biomedical sensors.

In the Special Issue, we would like to publish high-quality manuscripts, particularly review contributions, that demonstrate the advances in biomedical sensors.

Prof. Dr. James Rusling
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomedical devices for disease diagnosis and treatment
  • Assistive systems/rehabilitation robotics with multi-sensor systems
  • Biomedical signals, image processing, and analysis
  • Multiplexed biomarker detection
  • Point-of-care testing and devices
  • Microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip technologies
  • Biosensors and biochips in diagnostics and treatment
  • Mobile health
  • Machine learning and artificial intelligence in biomedical sensors
  • Implantable sensors
  • Inertial sensors
  • Clinical applications: diagnostic, guiding therapy, patient monitoring, disease prevention, and risk assessment
  • Sensors in healthcare
  • Activity monitoring
  • Bioinstrumentation
  • Medical sensor development
  • Medical applications using IoT sensor
  • Sensors and telemedicine
  • Wearable sensors for sports and health monitoring

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
IMU-Based Effects Assessment of the Use of Foot Orthoses in the Stance Phase during Running and Asymmetry between Extremities
Sensors 2021, 21(9), 3277; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21093277 - 10 May 2021
Viewed by 511
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to determine the amplitude of movement differences and asymmetries between feet during the stance phase and to evaluate the effects of foot orthoses (FOs) on foot kinematics in the stance phase during running. In total, 40 males [...] Read more.
The objectives of this study were to determine the amplitude of movement differences and asymmetries between feet during the stance phase and to evaluate the effects of foot orthoses (FOs) on foot kinematics in the stance phase during running. In total, 40 males were recruited (age: 43.0 ± 13.8 years, weight: 72.0 ± 5.5 kg, height: 175.5 ± 7.0 cm). Participants ran on a running treadmill at 2.5 m/s using their own footwear, with and without the FOs. Two inertial sensors fixed on the instep of each of the participant’s footwear were used. Amplitude of movement along each axis, contact time and number of steps were considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the movement in the sagittal plane is symmetric, but that it is not in the frontal and transverse planes. The right foot displayed more degrees of movement amplitude than the left foot although these differences are only significant in the abduction case. When FOs are used, a decrease in amplitude of movement in the three axes is observed, except for the dorsi-plantar flexion in the left foot and both feet combined. The contact time and the total step time show a significant increase when FOs are used, but the number of steps is not altered, suggesting that FOs do not interfere in running technique. The reduction in the amplitude of movement would indicate that FOs could be used as a preventive tool. The FOs do not influence the asymmetry of the amplitude of movement observed between feet, and this risk factor is maintained. IMU devices are useful tools to detect risk factors related to running injuries. With its use, even more personalized FOs could be manufactured. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Sensors-Recent Advances and Future Challenges)
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Article
An Intraocular Pressure Measurement Technique Based on Acoustic Radiation Force Using an Ultrasound Transducer: A Feasibility Study
Sensors 2021, 21(5), 1857; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21051857 - 07 Mar 2021
Viewed by 491
Abstract
High intraocular pressure (IOP) is one of the major risk factors for glaucoma, and thus accurate IOP measurements should be performed to diagnose and treat glaucoma early. In this study, a novel technique for measuring the IOP based on acoustic radiation force was [...] Read more.
High intraocular pressure (IOP) is one of the major risk factors for glaucoma, and thus accurate IOP measurements should be performed to diagnose and treat glaucoma early. In this study, a novel technique for measuring the IOP based on acoustic radiation force was proposed, and its potential was experimentally demonstrated. The proposed technique uses the acoustic radiation force to generate axial displacement on the ocular surface while simultaneously measuring the degree of deformation. In order to verify that the ocular displacement induced by the acoustic radiation force is related to the IOP, the experiment was conducted by fabricating a 5 MHz single element transducer and gelatin phantoms with different stiffness values. Our experimental results show that there is a close relationship between the ocular displacement by the acoustic radiation force and the IOP obtained by a commercial tonometer. Therefore, the proposed acoustic radiation force technique can be a promising candidate for measuring the IOP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Sensors-Recent Advances and Future Challenges)
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Letter
Temperature Correction to Enhance Blood Glucose Monitoring Accuracy Using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy
Sensors 2020, 20(21), 6231; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216231 - 31 Oct 2020
Viewed by 908
Abstract
Electrical methods are among the primarily studied non-invasive glucose measurement techniques; however, various factors affect the accuracy of the sensors used. Of these, the temperature is a critical factor; hence, the effects of temperature on the electrical properties of blood components are investigated [...] Read more.
Electrical methods are among the primarily studied non-invasive glucose measurement techniques; however, various factors affect the accuracy of the sensors used. Of these, the temperature is a critical factor; hence, the effects of temperature on the electrical properties of blood components are investigated in this study. Furthermore, the changes in the electrical properties of blood according to the glucose level are corrected by considering the effects of temperature on the electrical properties. An impedance sensor is developed and used to measure whole blood impedance in 10 healthy participants at various temperatures and glucose levels. Subsequently, the conductivities of the plasma and cytoplasm were extracted. Changes in the electrical properties of the blood components are then analyzed using linear regression and repeated measures ANOVA. The electrical conductivities of plasma and cytoplasm increased with increasing temperatures (plasma: 0.0397 (slope), 0.7814 (R2), cytoplasm: 0.014 (slope), 0.694 (R2)). At three values of increasing glucose levels (85.4, 158.1, and 271.8 mg/dL), the electrical conductivities of the plasma and cytoplasm decreased. These tendencies are more significant upon temperature corrections (p-values; plasma: 0.001, 0.001, cytoplasm: 0.003, 0.002). The relationships between temperature and electrical conductivity changes can thus be used for temperature corrections in blood glucose measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Sensors-Recent Advances and Future Challenges)
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