Special Issue "Mine Safety"

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bruce Hebblewhite

School of Minerals and Energy Resources Engineering, University of New South Wales Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mining engineering; mining methods; mine safety; strata control; mine geomechanics; subsidence; mining education
Co-Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Ting Ren

Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Development and application of advanced CFD modelling techniques in mining engineering, in particular, goaf gas flow characteristics for fire control and gas drainage, airflow patterns and dust controls on longwall face and drivages; innovative goaf inertisation methods for controlling gas explosion and spontaneous heating fires in longwall goafs; coal mine gas drainage and recovery technologies; Coal mine gas prediction and coalbed methane studies, particularly for multiple seams and abandoned coal mines/workings; mine ventilatin and innovative dust controls on modern longwall faces.
Co-Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Yosoon Choi

Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Mine Planning and Design; Open Pit Mining Operation; Mine Safety; Geographic Information Systems; 3D Geo-modeling and Geostatistics; Hydrological Analysis; Energy Analysis and Simulation; Design of Solar Energy Conversion Systems; Renewable Energy Systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Safety is focused on international mine safety. Mining, anywhere in the world, involves working in potentially-hazardous conditions, which require high levels of awareness of hazards and risks involved; well-designed mine plans and mining methods; and appropriate, proactive and responsive mine management approaches. A particular characteristic of mining hazards and associated risk management is that the level and nature of hazards can vary significantly from one day to another, as the mine develops through different regions of the rock mass where changing conditions prevail.

The approaches taken by mines to the important issue of mine safety can vary significantly around the world, as can the hazard levels and the different mining technologies and systems. However, the universal goal must be "zero harm" for all personnel.

This issue of Safety is dedicated to safety issues facing the mining industry and aims to showcase a range of safety-related mining environmental issues and hazard identification processes; case studies of proactive safety management initiatives; and analyses of, and insights into significant, industry-wide safety performance improvements and achievements.

Prof. Dr. Bruce Hebblewhite
Assoc. Prof. Ting Ren
Prof. Yosoon Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Safety is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mine safety
  • hazard assessment
  • risk management
  • core risks
  • mining conditions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
How Much Practice Is Required to Reduce Performance Variability in a Virtual Reality Mining Simulator?
Received: 11 December 2018 / Revised: 25 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
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Abstract
Virtual reality allows researchers to explore training scenarios that are not feasible or are potentially risky to recreate in the real world. The aim of this research was to examine whether using a tutorial session prior to using the mining simulator could adequately [...] Read more.
Virtual reality allows researchers to explore training scenarios that are not feasible or are potentially risky to recreate in the real world. The aim of this research was to examine whether using a tutorial session prior to using the mining simulator could adequately reduce the performance variability and increase the consistency of participant performance metrics. Eighteen participants were randomly assigned to a tutorial or a non-tutorial group. The tutorial group completed a five-minute tutorial that introduced them to the basics of the machine and virtual reality environment. All participants then completed five sessions in the simulator lasting five minutes each. Personality scores were recorded and participants answered questions to test their situational awareness after each session. Performance metrics such as number of collisions and perception response time were recorded by the simulator. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine at what point a significant difference in performance metrics was apparent across the five sessions. A mixed effects multilevel regression was done to evaluate the change in variability across time. There were no significant correlations between the personality questionnaire scores and the number of collisions or the perception response time. Both groups demonstrated high standard deviation scores for collisions and perception response time, but the tutorial group had decreasing variability across time. Both groups began to exhibit more consistent scores in the simulator after 10 min of use. Situational awareness questions require some refinement prior to further testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mine Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigating the Maturity of Incident Investigations of the Ghanaian Mining Industry and Its Effect on Safety Performance
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 4 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
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Abstract
Effective incident investigations have been recognised as a vital means of improving safety. Nevertheless, there has been little attempt to link incident investigations to actual safety performance. In this study, a framework for assessing the maturity of incident investigations and identifying areas for [...] Read more.
Effective incident investigations have been recognised as a vital means of improving safety. Nevertheless, there has been little attempt to link incident investigations to actual safety performance. In this study, a framework for assessing the maturity of incident investigations and identifying areas for improvements is described. The framework was developed based on a literature review and interviews with 41 investigators across five large-scale Ghanaian gold mines. The framework consists of 20 elements across four dimensions and five maturity levels. The dimensions (investigator competencies, system of investigation, stages of investigation and post-investigation findings) consider the most relevant aspects of practical investigation and for each dimension, elements that are more specific were defined across five maturity levels. Mapping the interview data collected from five mines into a maturity framework highlighted that the mines occupied different positions on the framework. Some occupied the advanced levels consistently and others consistently occupied the lower levels. Applying the interview data to the framework also identified priority areas for improvement. Finally, the maturity scores derived from mapping interview data onto the framework were correlated with the incidence rates of the mines to determine if any relationship existed between the two variables. The low incidence rate mines had higher maturity scores and the high incidence rate mines had lower maturity scores. It was found that the method was effective in practice, giving clear indications of areas where improvements are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mine Safety)
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