Special Issue "Energy Efficiency in Water Distribution and Supply Systems"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Oreste Fecarotta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (DICEA), University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: energy efficiency of water systems; optimization of water systems; pump as turbines (PATs); CFD analysis of hydraulic devices; energy recovery; water structures; rheology of non-Newtonian fluids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mariana Simão
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georesources (DECivil) and CERIS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-004 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: environmental engineering; hydraulic engineering; energy efficiency
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water distribution and supply systems are generally characterized by low efficiency and high energy demand, with high levels of leakage, a strong carbon footprint and expensive management costs. New management policies are thus required, involving optimal strategies, smart devices and innovative control techniques to reduce water losses, increase the efficiency of the water systems, reduce the energy demand and the carbon footprint.

This Special Issue aims to collect new studies in the field, providing the scientific community with effective tools to improve the efficiency of the water industry. The authors are invited to present novel papers on this subject, including:

  • New studies on specific devices (i.e. pump as turbines—PATs, or micro turbines) to save energy and reduce leakage in water systems
  • New design solutions for plants or new plant operations for the smart control of the distribution and supply networks
  • New strategies to optimize the management of the whole network, i.e. the optimal location of smart devices, smart control techniques, new methods of analysis of the efficiency of the system

Prof. Dr. Oreste Fecarotta
Dr. Mariana Simão
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Efficiency of water systems
  • Energy recovery
  • Energy saving
  • Water saving
  • Smart control of water systems
  • Computational fluid dynamics
  • Micro-hydro power solutions
  • PAT performance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Combining Energy Management Indicators and Life Cycle Assessment Indicators to Promote Sustainability in a Paper Production Plant
Resources 2020, 9(6), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9060075 - 21 Jun 2020
Viewed by 1648
Abstract
This paper presents the application of an energy characterization method based on the ISO 50001 standard in a dry paper production plant. This plant operates using electricity, gas, and coal as energy sources. The last two energy sources are used to produce the [...] Read more.
This paper presents the application of an energy characterization method based on the ISO 50001 standard in a dry paper production plant. This plant operates using electricity, gas, and coal as energy sources. The last two energy sources are used to produce the steam and hot air used in the paper drying process. Through energy characterization, indicators such as energy baseline and consumption indicators were calculated for the plant, with which improvement opportunities were identified. These improvement opportunities were used as case studies for each energy source used and were based on the actual state of the plant. 2011 Midpoint+ ILCD method data was selected from the Ecoinvent database, using OpenLCA 1.7.0 for the energy assessment. The impact categories analyzed in this study were ecotoxicity, eutrophication of rivers and seas, climate change, and human toxicity. As a result of this work, it was found that energy-saving was possible by adjusting the production rate to a load factor of 77%, which implies a gas consumption of 1.6 kWh/kg and a value in the climate change category of 88.5 kg of CO2 equivalent. In addition, some technological improvement opportunities were economical and environmentally evaluated as a result of the sustainable improvement strategy implemented with energy management and life cycle assessment. The study of these technological opportunities showed that in order to achieve a sustainable industrial process, it is important to take into account energy, economic, and environmental criteria in the continuous improvement of the paper production process. In addition, it is of vital importance to analyze alternatives for technological change, which have a greater impact than operational alternatives according to energy, environmental and economic criteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficiency in Water Distribution and Supply Systems)
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Article
Optimal Pump Scheduling for Urban Drainage under Variable Flow Conditions
Resources 2018, 7(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources7040073 - 13 Nov 2018
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2028
Abstract
The paper is focused on the optimal scheduling of a drainage pumping station, complying with variations in the pump rotational speed and a recurrent pattern for the inflow discharge. The paper is structured in several consecutive steps. In the first step, the experimental [...] Read more.
The paper is focused on the optimal scheduling of a drainage pumping station, complying with variations in the pump rotational speed and a recurrent pattern for the inflow discharge. The paper is structured in several consecutive steps. In the first step, the experimental set-up is described and results of calibration tests on different pumping machines are presented to obtain equations linking significant variables (discharge, head, power, efficiency). Then, those equations are utilized to build a mixed-integer optimization model able to find the scheduling solution that minimizes required pumping energy. The model is solved with respect to a case study referred to a urban drainage system in Naples (Italy) and optimization results are analysed to provide insights on the algorithm computational performance and on the influence of pumping machine characteristics on the overall efficiency savings. With reference to the simulated scenarios, an average value of 32% energy can be saved with an optimized control. Its actual value depends on the hydraulic characteristics of the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Efficiency in Water Distribution and Supply Systems)
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