Special Issue "Satellite Observations on Earth’s Atmosphere"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Satellite Missions for Earth and Planetary Exploration".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2022 | Viewed by 1913

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Wan Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Science Directory, NASA Langley Research Center, Virginia, VA 23681, USA
Interests: atmospheric sounding; calibration and validation; radiative transfer; retrieval algorithm development
Dr. Likun Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, Maryland, MD 20740, USA
Interests: calibration and validation; hyperspectral sounder; climate data records; intercalibration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Satellite-based observations provide critical information about Earth’s atmosphere for weather forecasting and global climate change studies. Atmospheric remote sensing techniques have advanced rapidly in the past decades with significant improvements in spectral resolution and coverage, spatial resolution, and radiometric accuracy of satellite-based sensors. Today’s satellite observation network consists of sophisticated sensors on both polar orbiting and geostationary satellites. Atmospheric properties have been measured with increasingly improved vertical, spatial, and temporal resolutions using comprehensive methods, including infrared and microwave sounding and radio occultation as well as imaging techniques in the visible region. This issue is dedicated to newly developed data processing algorithms and calibration techniques to improve the observation of Earth’s atmosphere through fully exploiting the information provided by current or next-generation satellite sensors. Submissions are encouraged on such topics as atmospheric temperature and moisture sounding, trace gas retrieval, retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties, and advances in calibration, validation, and measurement uncertainty to facilitate weather forecasting or climate trend studies. We also invite papers that introduce impact studies and algorithm development for future satellite-based atmosphere observation systems, such as CubeSat-based sounders and geostationary satellite-based hyperspectral sounders.

Dr. Wan Wu
Dr. Likun Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • atmosphere
  • satellite
  • retrieval
  • radiative transfer
  • calibration and validation
  • algorithm development
  • impact study

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Comparison of the Potential Impact to the Prediction of Typhoons of Various Microwave Sounders Onboard a Geostationary Satellite
Remote Sens. 2022, 14(7), 1533; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs14071533 - 22 Mar 2022
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Abstract
A microwave radiometer onboard a geostationary satellite can provide for the continuous atmospheric sounding of rapidly evolving convective events even in the presence of clouds, which has aroused great research interest in recent decades. To approach the problem of high-spatial resolution and large-size [...] Read more.
A microwave radiometer onboard a geostationary satellite can provide for the continuous atmospheric sounding of rapidly evolving convective events even in the presence of clouds, which has aroused great research interest in recent decades. To approach the problem of high-spatial resolution and large-size antennas, three promising geostationary microwave (GEO-MW) solutions—geostationary microwave radiometer (GMR) with a 5 m real aperture antenna, geostationary synthetic thinned aperture radiometer (GeoSTAR) with a Y-shaped synthetic aperture array, and geostationary interferometric microwave sounder (GIMS) with a rotating circular synthetic aperture array—have been proposed. To compare the potential impact of assimilating the three GEO-MW sounders to typhoon prediction, observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) with the simulated 50–60 GHz observing brightness temperature data were conducted using the mesoscale numerical model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF Date Assimilation-Four dimensional variational (WRFDA-4Dvar) assimilation system for Typhoons Hagibis and Bualoi which occurred in 2019. The results show that the assimilation of the three GEO-MW instruments with 4 channels of data at 50–60 GHz could lead to general positive impacts in this study. Compared with the control experiment, for the two cases of Bualoi and Hagibis, GMR improves the average 72 h typhoon track forecast accuracy by 24% and 43%, GeoSTAR by 33% and 50%, and GIMS by 10% and 29%, respectively. Overall, the three GEO-MW instruments show considerable promise in atmospheric sounding and data assimilation. The difference among these positive impacts seems to depend on the observation error of the three potential instruments. GeoSTAR is slightly better than the other two GEO-MW sounders, which may be because it has the smallest observation error of the 4 assimilation channels. Generally, this study illustrates that the performance of these three GEO-MW sounders is potentially adequate to support assimilation into numerical weather prediction models for typhoon prediction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Satellite Observations on Earth’s Atmosphere)
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Article
Experimental OMPS Radiance Assimilation through One-Dimensional Variational Analysis for Total Column Ozone in the Atmosphere
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(17), 3418; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173418 - 27 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 854
Abstract
This experiment is the first ultraviolet radiance assimilation for atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere. The experiment has provided better understanding of which observations need to be assimilated, what bias correction scheme may be optimal, and how to obtain surface reflectance. A [...] Read more.
This experiment is the first ultraviolet radiance assimilation for atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere. The experiment has provided better understanding of which observations need to be assimilated, what bias correction scheme may be optimal, and how to obtain surface reflectance. A key element is the extension of the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) to handle fully polarized radiances, which presents challenges in terms of computational resource requirements. In this study, a scalar (unpolarized) treatment of radiances was used. The surface reflectance plays an important role in assimilating the nadir mapper (NM) radiance of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS). Most OMPS NM measurements are affected by the surface reflection of solar radiation. We propose a linear spectral reflectance model that can be determined inline by fitting two OMPS NM channel radiances at 347.6 and 371.8 nm because the two channels have near zero sensitivity on atmospheric ozone. Assimilating a transformed reflectance measurement variable, the N value can overcome the difficulty in handling the large dynamic range of radiance and normalized radiance across the spectrum of the OMPS NM. It was found that the error in bias correction, surface reflectance, and neglecting polarization in radiative transfer calculations can be largely mitigated by using the two estimated surface reflectance. This study serves as a preliminary demonstration of direct ultraviolet radiance assimilation for total column ozone in the atmosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Satellite Observations on Earth’s Atmosphere)
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