Special Issue "Earth Observations for Coastal Resilience"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Thomas R. Allen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Political Science & Geography, Institute for Coastal Adaptation and Resilience (ICAR), Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA
Interests: Coastal and Estuarine Mapping; Marine and Coastal GIS; Natural Hazards
Dr. Joanne Halls
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, 601 S. College Rd., Wilmington, NC 28403, USA
Interests: Remote sensing, coastal geomorphology, LiDAR, GIS
Dr. Christine Hladik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology and Geography, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460, USA
Tel. 9124780338
Interests: Habitat mapping, multi-sensor data integration; LiDAR DEM accuracy; tidal marsh restoration
Dr. Thomas Crawford
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
Interests: Coastal geography; Hazards; Spatial Analysis; Vulnerability and Resilience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal landscapes, communities and places, and component ecosystems are under increasing threat from a variety of chronic stressors and acute disasters. Recent issues of Remote Sensing and other journals have highlighted the strong capabilities for remote sensing to inventory, monitor and retrieve critical parameters pertaining to coastal resources and habitats, yet there remains a niche to be explored and research to be highlighted that specifically addresses “resilience” in coastal systems. Broad interpretations typical of the concept must be refined and operationalized in order to advance their application in remote sensing science and applied practice. We invite high quality and innovative research articles that explore, asses, or implement concepts of resilience in coastal systems, including natural or built coastal environments. An array of concepts directly or indirectly incorporating principles of resilience are highlighted below, and we encourage potential authors to correspond with the guest editors to refine submission foci and build toward a synthesis article to identify future remote sensing and resilience research. The following topics are particularly encouraged:

  • Exposure: Use of remote sensing to quantify the degree to which natural habitats, resources, or human populations or coastal development are potentially affected by hazards and threats (e.g., sea level rise).
  • Susceptibility: Quantitative estimation of coastal system sensitivity or adjustment to climate-sensitive changes in coastal processes which connote damage, disruption or reduce service or functional capacity (e.g., ecosystem functions under stressors such as estuarine water quality or salinization).
  • Vulnerability: Remote sensing assessments that quantify the diminished tolerance or coping capabilities to climate stressors, disasters, variability or extremes. Vulnerability assessments may include risk mapping or analytic approaches juxtaposing climate extremes and receptor systems (e.g., storm surges and transgression with sea level rise, increasing extremes in rainfall, or tidal inundation).
  • Resiliency: Systemic or multi-parameter studies that evaluate the ability of a coastal system to anticipate, prepare, respond, recover or adapt while minimizing damage to the system under threat (coastal environmental, economic, or social). Such articles may impart remote sensing data and methods within wider inter- or multi-disciplinary problems (e.g., integrated assessments, emergency management, or coastal planning.)

Dr. Thomas R. Allen
Dr. Joanne Halls
Dr. Christine Hladik
Dr. Thomas Crawford
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sea level rise
  • Storm surge
  • Shoreline change
  • Coastal geomorphology
  • Coastal land use/land cover change
  • Risk and vulnerability assessment
  • Resilience, adaptation and mitigation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Adjusting Emergent Herbaceous Wetland Elevation with Object-Based Image Analysis, Random Forest and the 2016 NLCD
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(20), 2346; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11202346 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
Emergent herbaceous wetlands are characterized by complex salt marsh ecosystems that play a key role in diverse coastal processes including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, flood attenuation and shoreline protection. Surface elevation characterization and spatiotemporal distribution of these ecosystems are commonly obtained from LiDAR [...] Read more.
Emergent herbaceous wetlands are characterized by complex salt marsh ecosystems that play a key role in diverse coastal processes including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, flood attenuation and shoreline protection. Surface elevation characterization and spatiotemporal distribution of these ecosystems are commonly obtained from LiDAR measurements as this low-cost airborne technique has a wide range of applicability and usefulness in coastal environments. LiDAR techniques, despite significant advantages, show poor performance in generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) in tidal salt marshes due to large vertical errors. In this study, we present a methodology to (i) update emergent herbaceous wetlands (i.e., the ones delineated in the 2016 National Land Cover Database) to present-day conditions; and (ii) automate salt marsh elevation correction in estuarine systems. We integrate object-based image analysis and random forest technique with surface reflectance Landsat imagery to map three emergent U.S. wetlands in Weeks Bay, Alabama, Savannah Estuary, Georgia and Fire Island, New York. Conducting a hyperparameter tuning of random forest and following a hierarchical approach with three nomenclature levels for land cover classification, we are able to better map wetlands and improve overall accuracies in Weeks Bay (0.91), Savannah Estuary (0.97) and Fire Island (0.95). We then develop a tool in ArcGIS to automate salt marsh elevation correction. We use this ‘DEM-correction’ tool to modify an existing DEM (model input) with the calculated elevation correction over salt marsh regions. Our method and tool are validated with real-time kinematic elevation data and helps correct overestimated salt marsh elevation up to 0.50 m in the studied estuaries. The proposed tool can be easily adapted to different vegetation species in wetlands, and thus help provide accurate DEMs for flood inundation mapping in estuarine systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earth Observations for Coastal Resilience)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Methodology to Assess Land Use Development, Flooding, and Wetland Change as Indicators of Coastal Vulnerability
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(19), 2260; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11192260 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
Coastal areas around the world are becoming increasingly urban, which has increased stress to both natural and anthropogenic systems. In the United States, 52% of the population lives along the coast, and North Carolina is in the top 10 fastest growing states. Within [...] Read more.
Coastal areas around the world are becoming increasingly urban, which has increased stress to both natural and anthropogenic systems. In the United States, 52% of the population lives along the coast, and North Carolina is in the top 10 fastest growing states. Within North Carolina, the southeastern coast is the fastest growing region in the state. Therefore, this research has developed a methodology that investigates the complex relationship between urbanization, land cover change, and potential flood risk and tested the approach in a rapidly urbanizing region. A variety of data, including satellite (PlanetScope) and airborne imagery (NAIP and Lidar) and vector data (C-CAP, FEMA floodplains, and building permits), were used to assess changes through space and time. The techniques consisted of (1) matrix change analysis, (2) a new approach to analyzing shorelines by computing adjacency statistics for changes in wetland and urban development, and (3) calculating risk using a fishnet, or tessellation, where hexagons of equal size (15 ha) were ranked into high, medium, and low risk and comparing these results with the amount of urbanization. As other research has shown, there was a significant relationship between residential development and wetland loss. Where urban development has yet to occur, most of the remaining area is at risk to flooding. Importantly, the combined methods used in this study have identified at-risk areas and places where wetlands have migrated/transgressed in relationship to urban development. The combination of techniques developed here has resulted in data that local government planners are using to evaluate current development regulations and incorporating into the new long-range plan for the County that will include smart growth and identification of risk. Additionally, results from this study area are being utilized in an application to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Community Response System which will provide residents with lower flood insurance costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Earth Observations for Coastal Resilience)
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