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Applications of Remote Sensing Technology in Volcano Hazard Monitoring

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 797

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, Catania, Italy
Interests: UAS volcanology GIS remote sensing; volcanological monitoring; field work
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, Catania, Italy
Interests: volcanology GIS; topographic data

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, 95125 Catania, Italy
Interests: remote sensing application; analysis of the explosive activity and eruption dynamics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Remote sensing provides information about objects on or near the surface of the Earth and atmosphere based on their reflected or emitted radiation. Information is also typically captured at distances from a few to several meters in the form of image data. Generally, the provided information is essential in areas exposed to dangerous phenomena or those that are otherwise difficult to reach. Remote sensing systems span from ground to satellite; among them, unoccupied aerial systems (UASs, drones) are revolutionizing how imagery of Earth is captured.

Remote sensing data or their derivatives are often managed with other datasets within geographic information systems (GIS) aimed at conducting spatial analyses, generating quantitative distributed measurements, and mapping different processes and phenomena.

This Special Issue aims to show the progress of remote sensing applications in volcanological monitoring, hazard quantification, and risk mitigation. We also would like to encourage debates on how different remote sensing techniques can be synergically used to achieve the best possible investigation of volcanic processes.

This Special Issue welcomes academic articles about the applications of remote sensing systems aimed at discussing frontier application, and the developments of different remote sensing techniques and platforms in various branches of volcanology. This Special Issue invites contributions that enhance the understanding of eruptive dynamics, the estimation of the main eruptive parameters, and the associated hazards. The topics mainly include but are not limited to the following themes and techniques:

  • Data analysis of ground-based and satellite remote sensing systems;
  • Optical and TIR sensors;
  • UAS (unmanned aerial system) data analysis;
  • Analysis and monitoring of volcanic phenomena;
  • Morpho-structural analysis;
  • Integration of multiple sensor types;
  • Geological mapping;
  • Geomorphology;
  • Volcano-tectonics.

Dr. Emanuela De Beni
Dr. Cristina Proietti
Dr. Gaetana Ganci
Dr. Simona Scollo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • volcano monitoring and analysis
  • remote sensing systems
  • estimation of eruption parameters
  • ground-based, satellite, and UAS sensors
  • GIS

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

29 pages, 1171 KiB  
Review
Monitoring Volcanic Plumes and Clouds Using Remote Sensing: A Systematic Review
by Rui Mota, José M. Pacheco, Adriano Pimentel and Artur Gil
Remote Sens. 2024, 16(10), 1789; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs16101789 - 18 May 2024
Viewed by 503
Abstract
Volcanic clouds pose significant threats to air traffic, human health, and economic activity, making early detection and monitoring crucial. Accurate determination of eruptive source parameters is crucial for forecasting and implementing preventive measures. This review article aims to identify the most common remote [...] Read more.
Volcanic clouds pose significant threats to air traffic, human health, and economic activity, making early detection and monitoring crucial. Accurate determination of eruptive source parameters is crucial for forecasting and implementing preventive measures. This review article aims to identify the most common remote sensing methods for monitoring volcanic clouds. To achieve this, we conducted a systematic literature review of scientific articles indexed in the Web of Science database published between 2010 and 2022, using multiple query strings across all fields. The articles were reviewed based on research topics, remote sensing methods, practical applications, case studies, and outcomes using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Our study found that satellite-based remote sensing approaches are the most cost-efficient and accessible, allowing for the monitoring of volcanic clouds at various spatial scales. Brightness temperature difference is the most commonly used method for detecting volcanic clouds at a specified temperature threshold. Approaches that apply machine learning techniques help overcome the limitations of traditional methods. Despite the constraints imposed by spatial and temporal resolution and optical limitations of sensors, multiplatform approaches can overcome these limitations and improve accuracy. This study explores various techniques for monitoring volcanic clouds, identifies research gaps, and lays the foundation for future research. Full article
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