Special Issue "Value and Potential of Remote Sensing Data for Food, Energy, and Water Nexus"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Biogeosciences Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mekonnen Gebremichael
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: hydrologic remote sensing; food-energy-water nexus; hydrologic forecasting; reservoir operation
Dr. Ruopu Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Environmental Resources, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA
Interests: spatial modeling; groundwater modeling; socio-hydrological systems; agricultural land use

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Food, Energy, and Water (FEW) nexus is emerging as a powerful approach to managing resources jointly in a sustainable manner. This requires understanding of the interactions amongst the nexus components, and development of innovative nexus-based solutions to existing problems. Several research projects are currently underway on this topic.

Remote sensing observations provide valuable insights into region-wide processes on land, atmosphere, water, energy, and food on a scale that can complement ground-based monitoring and modeling efforts to tackle FEW nexus problems. Remote sensing data have been used to study the individual components of the nexus. However, there are not many publications that focus on the value and potential of remote sensing data for understanding and managing the nexus. Innovative ways of utilizing remote sensing data may be necessary in the context of the nexus study. No Special Issue has been published on this topic. This Special Issue aims to fill this important gap.

The objective of the Special Issue is to showcase the state-of-the-art in utilizing remote sensing data for food–energy–water (FEW) nexus studies in different sectors (e.g., agriculture, water supply, energy) and different geographic regions.

Manuscripts for this issue should fulfil the following criteria:

  • Research encompassing all three components of the nexus are highly encouraged; however, studies focusing on two components of the nexus are also welcome.
  • Research should apply remote sensing data to address at least one of the components of the nexus.
  • Innovative ways of utilizing remote sensing data in the study of the nexus is highly encouraged.

Dr. Mekonnen Gebremichael
Dr. Ruopu Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food-Energy-Water nexus 
  • Remote Sensing 
  • Energy-Water nexus
  • Food-Water nexus 
  • Agriculture 
  • Hydrological modeling 
  • Energy 
  • Urban agriculture
  • Analytical Framework

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Remote Sensing-Based Assessment of the Crop, Energy and Water Nexus in the Central Valley, California
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(14), 1701; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11141701 - 18 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
An integrated assessment of crop-energy-water (CEW) nexus is critical to understand the tradeoffs and synergies for better management of sustainable agricultural systems. In this study, we evaluate the historic evolution of CEW interactions in the Central Valley, California, a critical agricultural region that [...] Read more.
An integrated assessment of crop-energy-water (CEW) nexus is critical to understand the tradeoffs and synergies for better management of sustainable agricultural systems. In this study, we evaluate the historic evolution of CEW interactions in the Central Valley, California, a critical agricultural region that produces approximately 50% of US fruits, nuts and vegetables. Specifically, we consider three nexus elements, including water use for irrigation (blue water), energy use for groundwater pumping, and crop yield (for all crops aggregated, almond and cotton). To quantify the interactions between CEW elements, we estimate the water use for cropping (water footprint) and energy use for cropping (energy footprint). We conduct the analyses for four historical periods, i.e., 2007–2009 (Drought 1), 2010–2011 (Post-drought 1), 2012–2015 (Drought 2) and 2016–2018 (Post-drought 2). We find that the southern regions (San Joaquin and Tulare) are susceptible to greater stress on energy and water, especially during droughts. The groundwater footprint (GWF) has been continuously increasing due to greater crop water use and a shift from row crops to profitable water-intensive tree crops. The GWF in Tulare during Drought 2 was around 60% higher than Drought 1, where the GWF in Tulare was almost twice that of Sacramento. The energy and water uses for almond production have increased during the recent periods, whereas their uses have mostly decreased for cotton. On average, energy and water footprints under almond crop scenario are around 3–3.5 times as much as the footprints under all crops scenario. Full article
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