Special Issue "Remote Sensing in Applied Geophysics"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Chiara Colombero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Politecnico di Torino, Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Torino, Italy
Interests: applied geophysics; passive seismic methods; landslide and glacier monitoring; rock mechanics; waterborne geophysics
Prof. Cesare Comina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Torino, Department of Earth Sciences (DST), Torino, Italy
Interests: applied geophysics; surface waves; seismic site characterization; geotechnical engineering; waterborne geophysics
Prof. Dr. Alberto Godio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Politecnico di Torino, Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Torino, Italy
Interests: applied geophysics; frequency and time-domain electromagnetic; magnetotelluric method; ground-penetrating radar; geophysical characterization of glaciers; water and contaminants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Applied geophysics analyzes the distribution of physical properties in the subsurface for a wide range of applications. Seismic, electrical, magnetic, and electromagnetic methods are the most applied and well-established geophysical techniques. These methods share the advantages of being non-invasive and exploring wide areas of investigation with respect to conventional methods (e.g., drilling). Although the main relevance is in prospecting for natural resources, geophysical methods are also used as a valuable aid to geological, engineering, and environmental investigations at different scales.

Geophysical surveys are usually carried out deploying or moving the appropriate instrumentation directly on the ground surface. However, recent technological advances have brought the development of innovative acquisition systems more typical of the remote sensing community (e.g., airborne surveys).

At the same time, while applied geophysics mainly focuses on the subsurface, typical remote sensing techniques have the ability to accurately image the Earth’s surface with high-resolution investigations carried out by means of terrestrial, airborne, or satellite-based platforms. The integration of surface and subsurface information is often crucial for several purposes, including the processing of geophysical data, the characterization and time-lapse monitoring of surface and near-surface targets, and the reconstruction of highly detailed and comprehensive 3D models of the investigated areas.

In this Special Issue, we invite contributions focusing on recent and upcoming advances in the combined application of remote sensing and applied geophysics. Contributions showing the added value of surface reconstruction and/or monitoring in the processing, interpretation, and cross-comparison of geophyiscal techniques are particularly welcome. Contributions discussing the results of pioneering geophysical acquisitions by means of innovative remote systems are concurrently of interest.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • The role of surface topography inferred by remote sensing techniques on the acquisition, georeferencing, processing, and interpretation of geophysical data;
  • Combined approaches for complex 3D characterization and modeling of surface and subsurface targets and/or processes;
  • Multimethodological approaches for the monitoring of landslides, unstable rock masses, and/or issues of glacialised regions;
  • Case studies showing critical comparisons between data derived from remote sensing, and on-site geophysical prospections for geological, hydrogeological, environmental engineering, rock mechanics, and culural heritage applications;
  • Geophysical results obtained with remote acquisitions (e.g., geophysical sensors mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles or drones).

Dr. Chiara Colombero
Prof. Cesare Comina
Prof. Alberto Godio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Integration of remote sensing and applied geophysics
  • 3D modeling
  • Geophysical data acquisition, processing, and interpretation
  • Seismic, electrical, magnetic, and electromagnetic methods
  • Photogrammetry, SAR, and laser scanning
  • Monitoring techniques
  • Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) applied to geophysical prospecting

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Properties Analysis of Lunar Regolith at Chang’E-4 Landing Site based on 3D Velocity Spectrum of Lunar Penetrating Radar
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(4), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12040629 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
The Chinese Chang’E-4 mission for moon exploration has been successfully completed. The Chang’E-4 probe achieved the first-ever soft landing on the floor of Von Kármán crater (177.59°E, 45.46°S) of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin on January 3, 2019. Yutu-2 rover is mounted with [...] Read more.
The Chinese Chang’E-4 mission for moon exploration has been successfully completed. The Chang’E-4 probe achieved the first-ever soft landing on the floor of Von Kármán crater (177.59°E, 45.46°S) of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin on January 3, 2019. Yutu-2 rover is mounted with several scientific instruments including a lunar penetrating radar (LPR), which is an effective instrument to detect the lunar subsurface structure. During the interpretation of LPR data, subsurface velocity of electromagnetic waves is a vital parameter necessary for stratigraphic division and computing other properties. However, the methods in previous research on Chang’E-3 cannot perform velocity analysis automatically and objectively. In this paper, the 3D velocity spectrum is applied to property analysis of LPR data from Chang’E-4. The result shows that 3D velocity spectrum can automatically search for hyperbolas; the maximum value at velocity axis with a soft threshold function can provide the horizontal position, two-way reflected time and velocity of each hyperbola; the average maximum relative error of velocity is estimated to be 7.99%. Based on the estimated velocities of 30 hyperbolas, the structures of subsurface properties are obtained, including velocity, relative permittivity, density, and content of FeO and TiO2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Applied Geophysics)
Open AccessArticle
Automated Resistivity Profiling (ARP) to Explore Wide Archaeological Areas: The Prehistoric Site of Mont’e Prama, Sardinia, Italy
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(3), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12030461 - 01 Feb 2020
Abstract
This paper deals with the resistivity continuous surveys on extensive area carried out at the Mont’e Prama archaeological site, in Sardinia (Italy). From 2013 to 2015, new research was performed using both non-destructive surveys and traditional archaeological excavations. The measurements were done in [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the resistivity continuous surveys on extensive area carried out at the Mont’e Prama archaeological site, in Sardinia (Italy). From 2013 to 2015, new research was performed using both non-destructive surveys and traditional archaeological excavations. The measurements were done in order to find geophysical anomalies related to unseen buried archaeological remains and to define the spatial extension of the ancient necropolis. The electrical resistivity of soils was measured by means of the Automated Resistivity Profiling (ARP©) system. This multi-pole method provided high-resolution maps of electrical resistivity in the whole investigated area using a computer-assisted acquisition tool, towed by a small vehicle. Through this acquisition layout, a surface of 22,800 m2 was covered. The electrical resistivity data were derived in real time with centimetric horizontal precision through a differential GPS positioning system. Thanks to the simultaneous acquisition of ARP and GPS data, the rigorous georeferencing of the tridimensional experimental dataset was made possible, as well as the reconstruction of a detailed Digital Terrain Model. Here, the experimental results are analyzed and critically discussed by means of the integration of the results obtained by a high-resolution prospection performed with a multi-channel Ground Penetrating Radar system and taking into account other information derived from previous geological and archaeological studies. Geophysical results, jointly with topographic reconstruction, clearly permitted the identification of more interesting areas where future archaeological investigations could be focused. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Applied Geophysics)
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Open AccessArticle
Ice Thickness Estimation from Geophysical Investigations on the Terminal Lobes of Belvedere Glacier (NW Italian Alps)
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(7), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11070805 - 03 Apr 2019
Abstract
Alpine glaciers are key components of local and regional hydrogeological cycles and real-time indicators of climate change. Volume variations are primary targets of investigation for the understanding of ongoing modifications and the forecast of possible future scenarios. These fluctuations can be traced from [...] Read more.
Alpine glaciers are key components of local and regional hydrogeological cycles and real-time indicators of climate change. Volume variations are primary targets of investigation for the understanding of ongoing modifications and the forecast of possible future scenarios. These fluctuations can be traced from time-lapse monitoring of the glacier topography. A detailed reconstruction of the ice bottom morphology is however needed to provide total volume and reliable mass balance estimations. Non-destructive geophysical techniques can support these investigations. With the aim of characterizing ice bottom depth, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles and single-station passive seismic measurements were acquired on the terminal lobes of Belvedere Glacier (NW Italian Alps). The glacier is covered by blocks and debris and its rough topography is rapidly evolving in last years, with opening and relocation of crevasses and diffuse instabilities in the frontal sectors. Despite the challenging working environment, ground-based GPR surveys were performed in the period 2016–2018, using 70-MHz and 40-MHz antennas. The 3D ice bottom morphology was reconstructed for both frontal lobes and a detailed ice thickness map was obtained. GPR results also suggested some information on ice bottom properties. The glacier was found to probably lay on a thick sequence (more than 40 m) of subglacial deposits, rather than on stiff bedrock. Week deeper reflectors were identified only in the frontal portion of the northern lobe. These interfaces may indicate the bedrock presence at a depth of around 80 m from the topographic surface, rapidly deepening upstream. Single-station passive seismic measurements, processed with the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method, pointed out the absence of sharp vertical contrast in acoustic impedance between ice and bottom materials, globally confirming the hypotheses made on GPR results. The obtained results have been compared with previous independent geophysical investigations, performed in 1961 and 1985, with the same aim of ice thickness estimation. The comparison allowed us to validate the results obtained in the different surveys, supply a reference base map for the glacier bottom morphology and potentially study ice thickness variations over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Applied Geophysics)
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