Special Issue "Interfaith, Intercultural, International"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Claire Smith

College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cultural heritage; globalization; gender; religion; Indigenous archaeology; symbolic communication
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Amanda Kearney

College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, Flinders University, Australia
E-Mail
Interests: cultural heritage; globalization; Indigenous anthropology and archaeology; interculturalism; cultural wounding and healing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

One of the major challenges of our generation is to promote cross-cultural understandings at a time that the world is experiencing unprecedented change. Globalisation is simultaneously a threat and a promise. It promises the opportunity to achieve greater understandings between different peoples at the same time that it continues to increase inequities of wealth, power, and access to knowledge, both within and between countries. Globalisation encourages connections where previously there may have been only distance. That this challenges human life is certain, as witnessed by the tensions, enduring conflicts and assertions of increasingly bounded identities emerging in the contemporary world. What these times of change necessitate is a move away from logics of separation, and the exploration of life in a space of relational and interwoven experience. Cross-cultural understandings rely upon the realisation of distinct but intersecting futures whereby cultures, religions, and identities are not unknown to one another, instead they are apprehended by one another as deeply relational encounters of human life, expressed in myriad forms.

The interdisciplinary papers in this issue of Religions traverse boundaries relating to faith, culture, life forms and/or nations. This collection draws together current and sometimes ground-breaking scholarship regarding the barriers to, and facilitators of, enhanced understandings. Each article focuses on the challenges between faiths, between cultures, forms of life and/or between nations. Religion itself is conceived as one of a wide range of social practices, given practical, devotional, instrumentalist and educational expression. In some cases, religion can be a key to critical insights and a guide for actions and behaviour. In others, it is more peripheral, diffused across a range of imperceptible habits. Each of the contributions to this special issue will strive to break down social, cultural, ecological and economic divides, especially as they relate to fundamental human rights and responsibilities. The case studies highlighted in this issue are testament to a new approach to contemporary scholarship, one that places human responsiveness and rights at the core of academic theory and practice.

Prof. Dr. Claire Smith
Prof. Dr. Amanda Kearney
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interfaith
  • intercultural
  • international
  • globalisation
  • human rights and responsibility
  • cosmopolitan

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Interculturalism and Responsive Reflexivity in a Settler Colonial Context
Religions 2019, 10(3), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10030199
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract
This article explores interculturalism in Australia, a nation marked by the impact of coloniality and deep colonising. Fostering interculturalism—as a form of empathic understanding and being in good relations with difference—across Indigenous and non-Indigenous lived experiences has proven difficult in Australia. This paper [...] Read more.
This article explores interculturalism in Australia, a nation marked by the impact of coloniality and deep colonising. Fostering interculturalism—as a form of empathic understanding and being in good relations with difference—across Indigenous and non-Indigenous lived experiences has proven difficult in Australia. This paper offers a scoping of existing discourse on interculturalism, asking firstly, ‘what is interculturalism’, that is, what is beyond the rhetoric and policy speak? The second commitment is to examine the pressures that stymy the articulation of interculturalism as a broad-based project, and lastly the article strives to highlight possibilities for interculturalism through consideration of empathic understandings of sustainable futures and land security in Australia. Legislative land rights and land activism arranged around solidarity movements for sustainable futures are taken up as the two sites of analysis. In the first instance, a case is made for legislative land rights as a form of coloniality that maintains the centrality of state power, and in the second, land activism, as expressed in the campaigns of Seed, Australia’s first Indigenous youth-led climate network and the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, are identified as sites for plurality and as staging grounds for intercultural praxis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interfaith, Intercultural, International)
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