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Indonesia’s Orphanage Trade: Islamic Philanthropy’s Good Intentions, Some Not So Good Outcomes

1
College of Education, Psychology and Social Work, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia
2
Social Work Alumni, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2020, 11(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11010001
Received: 13 October 2019 / Revised: 7 December 2019 / Accepted: 16 December 2019 / Published: 18 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interfaith, Intercultural, International)
In 2011, Indonesia commenced an orphanage deinstitutionalization strategy known as the paradigm change in child protection. The strategy responded to human rights protocols emphasizing institutional care of children as a last resort. Orphanage based social workers were trained by the Ministry of Social Affairs (MOSA) to implement the paradigm change, increase parenting capacity and strengthen local supports to enable children’s reunification with their families. The paradigm change intended to reduce children coming into institutional care; however, we found a persistent growth of non-orphaned children being recruited to orphanages since 2011 and more orphanages being built to accommodate them. Islamic philanthropic activities were identified as supporting and contributing growth to the orphanage trade. Despite the paradigm change, social workers were financially incentivization to recruit children to orphanages. There were no similar incentives to deinstitutionalize them. This paper uses selective quotes from the larger study, of social workers interviewed, to assist with theorizing the high potential of Islamic philanthropy in supporting Indonesia’s growing orphan trade. We propose that philanthropy, including where there are good faith and good intentions, may be contributing to some not so good outcomes, including trafficking and modern-day slavery. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indonesia; orphanage; institutional care; social work; child protection; Islamic philanthropy; trafficking; incentivization Indonesia; orphanage; institutional care; social work; child protection; Islamic philanthropy; trafficking; incentivization
MDPI and ACS Style

McLaren, H.; Qonita, N. Indonesia’s Orphanage Trade: Islamic Philanthropy’s Good Intentions, Some Not So Good Outcomes. Religions 2020, 11, 1.

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