Next Article in Journal
The Scales Integral to Ecology: Hierarchies in Laudato Si’ and Christian Ecological Ethics
Next Article in Special Issue
“Whoever Harms a Dhimmī I Shall Be His Foe on the Day of Judgment”: An Investigation into an Authentic Prophetic Tradition and Its Origins from the Covenants
Previous Article in Journal
Christian Ethics and Ecologies of Violence
Previous Article in Special Issue
Drawing Spirits in the Sand: Performative Storytelling in the Digital Age
Open AccessArticle

Past as Prophecy: Indigenous Diplomacies beyond Liberal Settler Regimes of Recognition, as Told in Shell

Department of Anthropology and American Studies Program, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02453, USA
Religions 2019, 10(9), 510; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10090510
Received: 15 July 2019 / Revised: 27 August 2019 / Accepted: 28 August 2019 / Published: 2 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interfaith, Intercultural, International)
According to a prophecy told in a small, Muskogee-identified community in the US South, the seeds of Indigenous ways of knowing and relating to more-than-human kin will once again flourish in the ruins of colonial orders. Even settlers will be forced to turn to Indigenous knowledges because “they have destroyed everything else”. Following this visionary history-future, this article asks how Indigenous diplomacies and temporalities animate resurgent possibilities for making life within the fractures (and apocalyptic ruins) of settler states. This demands a rethinking of the global and the international from the perspective of deep Indigenous histories. I draw on research visiting ancestral landscapes with community members, discussing a trip to an ancient shell mound and a contemporary cemetery in which shells are laid atop grave plots. These stories evoke a long-term history of shifting and multivalient shell use across religious and temporal differences. They speak to practices of acknowledgement that exceed liberal settler regimes of state recognition and extend from much older diplomatic practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: archaeological ethnography; Southeastern United States; community-based research; Native American peoples; indigenous transnationalisms; trans-Indigenous; Indigenous diplomacies; mounds; resurgence archaeological ethnography; Southeastern United States; community-based research; Native American peoples; indigenous transnationalisms; trans-Indigenous; Indigenous diplomacies; mounds; resurgence
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bloch, L. Past as Prophecy: Indigenous Diplomacies beyond Liberal Settler Regimes of Recognition, as Told in Shell. Religions 2019, 10, 510.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop