Alternative Solvents, Biomass, and Catalysis as Pivotal Tools in Green Chemistry

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 4149

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomass Science and Conversion Technology, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
2. Biological Systems and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Interests: sustainable process development; isolation of bioactives and biopolymers; transformation of waste biomass into valuable bioproducts; bioseparations; biomaterials; ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents
Department of Biomass Science and Conversion Technology, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
Interests: computational and theoretical chemistry; lignin valorization; phase equilibria of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents; biomass utilization and conversion to produce value-added chemicals

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Guest Editor
Department of Biomass Science and Conversion Technology, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; surface characterization; materials science; ionic liquids applications for agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, process development, separation, and biomass manipulation among others

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Green chemistry is an area of research that has received significant attention since its development in the 1990s to provide a framework for improving processes and systems in all of the chemical sciences. Among the 12 principles of green chemistry, the principles focusing on catalysis, renewable feedstocks, and safer solvents stand out for their significance, intersectionality, and foundational relevance. Therefore, these key areas have served as transformational tools in the field of green chemistry and have directed and guided the design and development of a significant research effort in the scientific community.

This Special Issue on “Alternative Solvents, Biomass, and Catalysis as Pivotal Tools in Green Chemistry” aims to cover the recent advances in the field of green chemistry, focusing on the use of (a) alternative solvents (ionic liquids, deep eutectic solvents); (b) renewable biomass feedstocks (lignocellulosic, chitinous, waste residues); and (c) catalysis (heterogeneous and homogeneous), in conjunction or individually, and thereby provide interdisciplinary, comprehensive, and insightful research in the area.
We welcome all kinds of high-standard articles (research and review papers) from academia, industries, and government agencies. We do hope that this Special Issue will draw together contributors from different fields to stimulate the exchange of ideas and spread knowledge on the current capabilities and the new possibilities for a sustainable future.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Experimental, theoretical, and computational research on process development and engineering;
  • Integrated process design and scale-up;
  • Biofuels, biorefineries, bioprocesses, and bioproducts: (bio)catalysis and fermentation;
  • Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyzed biomass conversion into chemicals/fuels;
  • Biomass valorization for commodity chemicals;
  • Extraction of chemicals from biomass using alternative solvents;
  • Phase equilibria and applications of alternative solvents (e.g., ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents);
  • Development of alternative solvents and green processes for sustainable applications;
  • Catalysis for a variety of feedstocks (e.g., biomass, polymeric materials, and synthesis);
  • Chemical and biochemical process modeling, simulation, optimization, and control.

Dr. Ezinne C. Achinivu
Dr. Mood Mohan
Dr. Hemant Choudhary
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green chemistry
  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • homogeneous catalysts
  • biomass
  • ionic liquids
  • deep eutectic solvents
  • process development
  • synthesis
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1628 KiB  
Article
Intensification Insights from Chemical Looping Combustion Using Coal–Biomass Mixtures with Fe-Based Oxygen Carrier
by Mayur D. Kevat and Tamal Banerjee
Processes 2022, 10(7), 1242; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10071242 - 22 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1315
Abstract
Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a modern technology that enables the mitigation of the CO2 concentration without any expense of energy. Experimental evidence shows that combustion of coal/biomass in CLC technology leads to negative carbon emission by replacing the portion of coal [...] Read more.
Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a modern technology that enables the mitigation of the CO2 concentration without any expense of energy. Experimental evidence shows that combustion of coal/biomass in CLC technology leads to negative carbon emission by replacing the portion of coal with biomass. In the present work, CLC was simulated using a mixture of coal/biomass in CLC; using their different proportions resulted in enhanced CO and CO2 fractions in the fuel reactor. The carbon capture and oxide oxygen fraction were also found to increase with the enhancement of the fuel reactor’s temperature with different proportions of coal/biomass. Increases in the carbon capture efficiency and oxide oxygen fraction of up to 98.86% and ~98%, respectively, were observed within the experimental temperature range. The simulated results of various parameters were predicted and validated with the published experimental results. The stated parameters were also predicted as a function of the different rates of solid circulation and gasification agents. Higher coal char conversion was confirmed in the fuel reactor with the presence of higher biomass concentrations. Full article
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13 pages, 3318 KiB  
Communication
Unsteady-State Mathematical Modeling of Hydrocarbon Feedstock Pyrolysis
by Igor Dolganov, Ajur Bunaev and Irena Dolganova
Processes 2020, 8(11), 1394; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8111394 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1742
Abstract
Hydrocarbon feedstock pyrolysis is an important method for obtaining monomers that are then used to produce various polymer materials. During this process, a mixture of hydrocarbons is heated at a high temperature and in the absence of oxygen. Because of the side reactions [...] Read more.
Hydrocarbon feedstock pyrolysis is an important method for obtaining monomers that are then used to produce various polymer materials. During this process, a mixture of hydrocarbons is heated at a high temperature and in the absence of oxygen. Because of the side reactions of polymerization and polycondensation, coke products are formed and settle on the inner walls of the coil. This decreases the technical efficiency of the hydrocarbon pyrolysis furnace during its operation, making the process unsteady. In the present research, we developed an unsteady-state mathematical model of hydrocarbon feedstock pyrolysis in order to improve the monitoring, forecasting, and optimization of this technological process. This model can calculate the rate of coke deposition along the length of the coil, considering the technological parameters and the composition of the supplied raw materials (the calculated value of coke deposition rate equals 0.01 mm/day). It was shown that with an increase in the propane/butane ratio from 4/1 to 1/4 mol/mol, the ethylene concentration decreases from 3.45 mol/L to 3.35 mol/L. Full article
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