Soil Pollution Characterization and Gentle Remediation Options

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 3041

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mining, Topography and Structural Engineering, University of León, Av/Silverio Fernández Tirador, 24007 León, Spain
Interests: environmental engineering; process engineering; mineral processing; environmental conditions in mines; risk assessment; geometallurgy; environmental geochemistry; soil pollution; soil washing; hazardous materials management

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Guest Editor
INDUROT and Environmental Technology, Biotechnology and Geochemistry Group, University of Oviedo, 33600 Mieres, Spain
Interests: nanoremediation; mine reclamation; soil remediation; environmental geochemistry; soil pollution; soil washing; biochar; magnetic separation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil plays a vital role in the stability of ecosystems and human survival and development. However, the intensification of human activity, caused by many factors, such as industrialization, agricultural techniques, or mining activities, has negatively affected soil quality. In this sense, soil pollution is a major global concern, which is dealt with using several soil remediation techniques. Gentle remediation options (GRO), such as bioremediation, phytoremediation, nanoremediation, or stabilization, have received attention in recent years as effective, environmentally friendly, and low-cost techniques. In this Special Issue, the role of GRO will be presented with a special emphasis on soil remediation. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Soil stabilization using organic amendments (compost, biochar, etc.);
  • Nanoremediation for inorganic and organic pollutants immobilization in soils;
  • Phytoremediation for metals and metalloids.

Authors are invited and welcome to submit original research papers, reviews, and short communications.

Dr. Carlos Sierra Fernández
Dr. Diego Baragaño Coto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • soil remediation
  • soil stabilization
  • nanoremediation
  • organic amendments
  • phytoremediation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 635 KiB  
Article
Metal Accumulation Profile of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don and Celosia argentea L. with EDTA Co-Application
by Muneeba Qurban, Cyrus Raza Mirza, Aqib Hassan Ali Khan, Walid Khalifa, Mustapha Boukendakdji, Belkacem Achour, Sohail Yousaf, Ismat Nawaz, Tayyab Ashfaq Butt and Mazhar Iqbal
Processes 2021, 9(4), 598; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9040598 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2229
Abstract
The problem of metal-induced toxicity is proliferating with an increase in industrialization and urbanization. The buildup of metals results in severe environmental deterioration and harmful impacts on plant growth. In this study, we investigated the potential of two ornamental plants, Catharanthus roseus (L.) [...] Read more.
The problem of metal-induced toxicity is proliferating with an increase in industrialization and urbanization. The buildup of metals results in severe environmental deterioration and harmful impacts on plant growth. In this study, we investigated the potential of two ornamental plants, Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don and Celosia argentea L., to tolerate and accumulate Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Cu. These ornamental plants were grown in Hoagland’s nutrient solution containing metal loads (50 µM and 100 µM) alone and in combination with a synthetic chelator, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (2.5 mM). Plant growth and metal tolerance varied in both plant species for Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Cu. C. roseus growth was better in treatments without EDTA, particularly in Ni, Cr, and Pb treatments, and Pb content increased in all parts of the plant. In contrast, Cd content decreased with EDTA addition. In C. argentea, the addition of EDTA resulted in improved plant biomass at both doses of Cu. In contrast, plant biomass reduced significantly in the case of Ni. In C. argentea, without EDTA, root length in Cd and Cu treatments was significantly lower than the control and other treatments. However, the addition of EDTA resulted in improved growth at both doses for Pb and Cu. Metal accumulation in C. argentea enhanced significantly with EDTA addition at both doses of Cu and Cd. Hence, it can be concluded that EDTA addition resulted in improved growth and better metal uptake than treatments without EDTA. Metal accumulation increased with EDTA addition compared to treatments without EDTA, particularly for Pb in C. roseus and Cu and Cd in C. argentea. Based on the present results, C. roseus showed a better ability to phytostabilize Cu, Cd, and Ni, while C. argentea worked better for Ni, Cd, Cu, and Pb. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Pollution Characterization and Gentle Remediation Options)
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