Electrochemical and Photocatalytic-Based Degradation Technologies for the Treatment of Emerging Contaminants

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 893

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300350, China
Interests: environmental nanomaterials; water remediation technology; advanced oxidation technology
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300350, China
Interests: advanced oxidation processes; fenton; zero valent iron; chelating agents; wastewater treatment technologies; environmental health
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the urgent need for novel clean energy, electrochemical and photocatalytic technologies have been extensively employed in energy conversion, environmental governance, and other fields, providing strong technical support for the new energy industry and environmental protection industry; these technologies have also provided new opportunities for the innovative development of materials. In recent years, photocatalysis and electrocatalysis have led to innovative research on novel materials and reactions, playing a significant role in energy conversion, organic synthesis, environmental remediation and the treatment of emerging contaminants.

This Special Issue, entitled “Electrochemical and Photocatalytic-Based Degradation Technologies for the Treatment of Emerging Contaminants”, seeks high-quality papers focusing on the latest advances in electrochemical and photocatalytic technologies for the treatment of emerging contaminants. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Theory and mechanism of photocatalysis/electrocatalysis
  • Design, analysis, control, optimization or operation of photocatalysis/electrocatalysis system.
  • Treat of environmental emerging contaminants
  • Research on advanced oxidation technology
  • Catalytic materials and performance application
  • Conservation of renewable energy
  • Development and application of photocatalysis/electrocatalysis in industry

Thank you. I hope you consider participating in this Special Issue.

Sincerely,

Dr. Wei Wang
Dr. Ying Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electrocatalysis
  • photocatalysis
  • photoelectrocatalysis
  • advanced oxidation process
  • energy system
  • environmental functional materials
  • emerging contaminants
  • degradation technologies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 8170 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of Integrated Material with Activation and Oxidation Functions by Mechanical Milling of Activated Carbon and Persulfate for Enhanced Tetracycline Degradation over Non-Radical Mechanism
by Peng Tan, Nuo Meng, Xuxin Cao, Xiguo Zhang, Yuanyuan Huang, Tielong Li and Wei Wang
Processes 2024, 12(4), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12040672 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 707
Abstract
As an alternative to the traditional advanced oxidation process of adding potassium persulfate (PS) and its activator to the solution separately, in this study, M(AC-PS), an integrated activator and catalyst, was synthesized by vacuum ball milling of PS and activated carbon (AC) to [...] Read more.
As an alternative to the traditional advanced oxidation process of adding potassium persulfate (PS) and its activator to the solution separately, in this study, M(AC-PS), an integrated activator and catalyst, was synthesized by vacuum ball milling of PS and activated carbon (AC) to improve the PS’s utilization efficiency. The joint mechanical milling caused a change in the preferentially exposed crystal surface of the PS and the generation of more π-π* structures on the AC, leading to successful and stable connection of the PS onto the surface of the AC. Within 40 min, the M(AC-PS) achieved a degradation rate of 97.3% for tetracycline (TC, 20 mg/L), while the mixed system where AC and PS were separately ball milled achieved only a 53.1% removal of TC. Reactive oxygen species and electrochemical tests showed that M(AC-PS) mainly oxidized TC through non-free radical mechanisms. In M(AC-PS), AC provided oxygen-containing functional groups (e.g., C=O) to activate the PS and electron holes as an electron transfer medium, generating 1O2 and promoting electron donation from the TC to enhance the oxidation of the TC. Almost no catalytic components were detected in the solution, indicating that the obtained solid composite material avoids the limitations of solid–liquid interface contact and mass transfer, and then improves the efficiency of activation and catalysis. This study presents a simple and feasible method for obtaining efficient and convenient material for the advanced oxidation treatment of wastewater. Full article
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