Special Issue "(Nano)Cellulose in Biomedical Research"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Circular and Green Polymer Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 879

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Wei Zhang
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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Polymer Research Institute at Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China
Interests: nanofibers; UHMWPE fibers; electrospinning; gel spinning; 3D printing; polymer composites; water treatment; biomaterials; energy storage materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Bin Li
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Guest Editor
Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101, China
Interests: lignocellulose; nanomaterials from biomass; natural polymers; functional materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Ximu Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chongqing Municipal Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedical Engineering of Higher Education, Chongqing Medical University; Chongqing 401174, China
Interests: biopolymers; hydrogel; adhesive; tissue engineering;

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocellulose is abundant and renewable in nature, representing a very appealing material among various kinds of nanomaterials. Nanocellulose exhibits outstanding mechanical properties together with low density, high specific surface area, and tunable surface chemistry. In addition, its other coveted characteristics, such as it high hydrophilicity, low solubility, low toxicity, biodegradability, and biocompatibility, have made nanocellulose a promising material for use in different biomedical applications. This Special Issue is dedicated to promoting outstanding research concerning nanocellulose for biomedical applications, including wound dressing, drug delivery, tissue engineering scaffolds, biosensors, biomedical implants, and beyond, with a focus on state-of-the-art progress, development, and new trends. Perspectives, review articles, full paper, short communication, and technical papers on this topic are all welcome.

Dr. Wei Zhang
Dr. Bin Li
Dr. Ximu Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanocellulose
  • wound dressing
  • drug delivery
  • tissue engineering
  • biosensor
  • biomedical implant

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Tailoring Interfacial Adhesion between PBAT Matrix and PTFE-Modified Microcrystalline Cellulose Additive for Advanced Composites
Polymers 2022, 14(10), 1973; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14101973 - 12 May 2022
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Abstract
Cellulose materials have the potential to serve as sustainable reinforcement in polymer composites, but they suffer from challenges in improving interfacial compatibility with polymers through surface modification. Here, we propose adjusting the interfacial compatibility between microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and poly (butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) [...] Read more.
Cellulose materials have the potential to serve as sustainable reinforcement in polymer composites, but they suffer from challenges in improving interfacial compatibility with polymers through surface modification. Here, we propose adjusting the interfacial compatibility between microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and poly (butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) through the strategy based on surface energy regulation. Mechanical ball milling with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) powder was used to simultaneously pulverize, and surface modify MCC to produce MCC sheets with different surface energy. The modified MCC was used to reinforce PBAT composites by simple melt blending. The surface morphology, surface energy of MCC, and the amount of friction transferred PTFE during ball milling were characterized. The mechanical performance, composite morphology, crystallization behavior and dynamic thermomechanical analysis of the composites were investigated. The interfacial adhesion strength of composites closely relates to the surface energy of modified MCC. When the surface energy of MCC is closer to that of the PBAT matrix, it exhibits the better interfacial adhesion strength, resulting in the increased mechanical properties, crystallization temperature, storage modulus, and loss modulus. This work provides effective strategy for how to design fillers to obtain high-performance composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue (Nano)Cellulose in Biomedical Research)
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Article
Polyethylenimine-Functionalized Nanofiber Nonwovens Electrospun from Cotton Cellulose for Wound Dressing with High Drug Loading and Sustained Release Properties
Polymers 2022, 14(9), 1748; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14091748 - 26 Apr 2022
Viewed by 357
Abstract
Electrospun cellulose nanofiber nonwovens have shown promise in wound dressing owing to the highly interconnected pore structure, high hydrophilicity coupled with other coveted characteristics of biodegradability, biocompatibility and renewability. However, electrospun cellulose wound dressings with loaded drugs for better wound healing have been [...] Read more.
Electrospun cellulose nanofiber nonwovens have shown promise in wound dressing owing to the highly interconnected pore structure, high hydrophilicity coupled with other coveted characteristics of biodegradability, biocompatibility and renewability. However, electrospun cellulose wound dressings with loaded drugs for better wound healing have been rarely reported. In this study, a novel wound dressing with a high drug loading capacity and sustained drug release properties was successfully fabricated via electropinning of cellulose followed by polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalization. Remarkably, the grafted PEI chains on the surface of electrospun cellulose nanofibers provided numerous active amino groups, while the highly porous structure of nonwovens could be well retained after modification, which resulted in enhanced adsorption performance against the anionic drug of sodium salicylate (NaSA). More specifically, when immersed in 100 mg/L NaSA solution for 24 h, the as-prepared cellulose-PEI nonwoven displayed a multilayer adsorption behavior. And at the optimal pH of 3, a high drug loading capacity of 78 mg/g could be achieved, which was 20 times higher than that of pristine electrospun cellulose nonwoven. Furthermore, it was discovered that the NaSA-loaded cellulose-PEI could continuously release the drug for 12 h in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating the versatility of cellulose-PEI as an advanced wound dressing with drug carrier functionalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue (Nano)Cellulose in Biomedical Research)
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