Special Issue "Polymer Materials for Holography"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Izabela Naydenova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Interests: holographic recording materials, self-processing photopolymers,holographic structuring, holographic optical elements and sensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Suzanne Martin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Tel. 353 1 4024613
Interests: holographic recording materials, self-processing photopolymers, diffractive structures, holographic optical elements, holographic lenses, holographic diffusers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of novel applications of holography, such as the design and fabrication of versatile holographic optical elements for light collection, redirection and shaping, holographic sensors and actuators, information storage and processing systems have been closely related to the development of novel recording materials. Polymer-based photosensitive materials for holographic recording are at the centre of academic and industry research interests and some remarkable achievements have been reported in recent years. Theoretical modelling and an increased understanding of recording processes have allowed the design of materials with large variety of targeted properties.

This Special Issue focuses on materials for holography and will aim at demonstrating researchers’ ability to design, synthesise and manufacture polymer-based materials that address the challenges posed by long existing and emerging holographic applications.

Prof. Izabela Naydenova
Dr. Suzanne Martin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Self-processing photopolymers
  • Photopolymers for holographic recording
  • Holographic recording materials
  • Nanocomposite polymer materials
  • Photorefractive polymers
  • Polymers for holographic lithography
  • Theoretical modeling of photosensitive polymers
  • Applications of polymer holograms
  • Manufacturing processes for polymer holograms
  • Functionalised polymer holograms
  • Polymer dispersed liquid crystals for holograph
  • Anisotropic polymer materials
  • Polymer materials for polarization holography
  • Azo-dye based polymers for holography

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
On the Evaluation of the Suitability of the Materials Used to 3D Print Holographic Acoustic Lenses to Correct Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Aberrations
Polymers 2019, 11(9), 1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11091521 - 19 Sep 2019
Abstract
The correction of transcranial focused ultrasound aberrations is a relevant topic for enhancing various non-invasive medical treatments. Presently, the most widely accepted method to improve focusing is the emission through multi-element phased arrays; however, a new disruptive technology, based on 3D printed holographic [...] Read more.
The correction of transcranial focused ultrasound aberrations is a relevant topic for enhancing various non-invasive medical treatments. Presently, the most widely accepted method to improve focusing is the emission through multi-element phased arrays; however, a new disruptive technology, based on 3D printed holographic acoustic lenses, has recently been proposed, overcoming the spatial limitations of phased arrays due to the submillimetric precision of the latest generation of 3D printers. This work aims to optimize this recent solution. Particularly, the preferred acoustic properties of the polymers used for printing the lenses are systematically analyzed, paying special attention to the effect of p-wave speed and its relationship to the achievable voxel size of 3D printers. Results from simulations and experiments clearly show that, given a particular voxel size, there are optimal ranges for lens thickness and p-wave speed, fairly independent of the emitted frequency, the transducer aperture, or the transducer-target distance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Materials for Holography)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrically Tunable Fresnel Lens in Twisted-Nematic Liquid Crystals Fabricated by a Sagnac Interferometer
Polymers 2019, 11(9), 1448; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11091448 - 04 Sep 2019
Abstract
This paper presents an electrically tunable Fresnel lens in a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell fabricated by using a Sagnac interferometer. When the Fresnel-patterned green beam, formed by the Sagnac interferometer, is irradiated on the azo-dye doped liquid crystal mixture, the azo-dye molecules [...] Read more.
This paper presents an electrically tunable Fresnel lens in a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell fabricated by using a Sagnac interferometer. When the Fresnel-patterned green beam, formed by the Sagnac interferometer, is irradiated on the azo-dye doped liquid crystal mixture, the azo-dye molecules undergo transcis photoisomerization and then generate the photo-alignment effect in the bright (odd) zones. The director of the liquid crystal molecules in the odd zones reorients the direction perpendicular to the polarization direction of the linearly polarized green beam. The various structures of liquid crystals in the odd and even zones will result in a phase difference and thus, a Fresnel lens can be generated. The experimental results show that the proposed Fresnel lens has a high diffraction efficiency of 31.5% under an applied alternating-currents (AC) voltage. The focal length of the Fresnel lens can also be tuned by thermally erasing the photo-alignment effect of the azo dyes and rewriting by a different Fresnel-like pattern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Materials for Holography)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrically Controlled Diffraction Grating in Azo Dye-Doped Liquid Crystals
Polymers 2019, 11(6), 1051; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11061051 - 16 Jun 2019
Abstract
This research applies the non-linear effect of azo dye-doped liquid crystal materials to develop a small, simple, and adjustable beam-splitting component with grating-like electrodes. Due to the dielectric anisotropy and optical birefringence of nematic liquid crystals, the director of the liquid crystal molecules [...] Read more.
This research applies the non-linear effect of azo dye-doped liquid crystal materials to develop a small, simple, and adjustable beam-splitting component with grating-like electrodes. Due to the dielectric anisotropy and optical birefringence of nematic liquid crystals, the director of the liquid crystal molecules can be reoriented by applying external electric fields, causing a periodic distribution of refractive indices and resulting in a diffraction phenomenon when a linearly polarized light is introduced. The study also discusses the difference in the refractive index (Δn), the concentration of azo dye, and the rising constant depending on the diffraction signals. The experimental results show that first-order diffraction efficiency can reach ~18% with 0.5 wt % azo dye (DR-1) doped in the nematic liquid crystals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Materials for Holography)
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Open AccessArticle
Holographic Characteristics of Photopolymers Containing Different Mixtures of Nematic Liquid Crystals
Polymers 2019, 11(2), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11020325 - 13 Feb 2019
Abstract
A holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) is used to record holographic diffraction gratings. Several mixtures of nematic liquid crystals (LC) are used as components of the HPDLC to evaluate their influence in static and dynamic basic properties. The diffraction efficiency obtained in [...] Read more.
A holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) is used to record holographic diffraction gratings. Several mixtures of nematic liquid crystals (LC) are used as components of the HPDLC to evaluate their influence in static and dynamic basic properties. The diffraction efficiency obtained in the reconstruction of the holograms is evaluated to compare the influence of the different LC. Additionally, the samples are exposed to a variable electric field and the diffracted light intensity as a function of the applied voltage is measured to evaluate the influence of the LC. The results obtained show significant differences depending on the LC incorporated to the photopolymer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Materials for Holography)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Mechanism of material removal by fixed abrasive lapping of fused quartz glass

Z. Cao

2. Polymer composites for terahertz optical materials

A. Nakanishi

3. An article paper about polymer materials for holography by the guest editors, title pending preparation

I. Naydenova

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