Manufacturing and Processing of Fibre Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 4102

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Transilvania University of Brasov, 29 Eroilor Boulevard, 500036 Brasov, Romania
Interests: aerospace engineering; additive manufacturing; 3D printing; composite materials
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Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Machine Building, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Memorandumului 28, 400114 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: composite materials; fiber-reinforced polymer; mechanical behavior; structure analyses; application of FRP; morphology analyses; additive manufacturing; structure reparation; green composites; prototyping methods; motorsport application
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Department of Mechatronics, Politehnica University Timisoara, 300222 Timișoara, Romania
Interests: polymers; materials; mechanical properties; polymeric materials; material characterization; advanced materials; fracture mechanics; plasticity tensile testing; elasticity; nonlinear analysis; dynamic simulation; materials engineering; viscoelasticity; polymer composites; polyurethane; micromechanics; mechanics DMA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP) have found applications and developed continuously and rapidly in all industrial fields like aerospace, automotive and, industrial goods. The fiber–polymer formulation and interaction need to lead to a composite material with better mechanical properties. The various applications required the development of specific manufacturing processes for each composite component. There are numerous methods for manufacturing composite components. The automating manufacturing processes of FRP cut manufacturing time and the cost. Also, machining of composite materials is difficult to carry out due to the anisotropic and non-homogeneous structure.

This Special Issue is intended to gather original works related to manufacturing, machining, experimental studies, characterization and applications of FRP composites.

Dr. Razvan Udroiu
Prof. Dr. Paul Bere
Dr. Dan Serban
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • fibre reinforced polymer
  • manufacturing methods
  • processing
  • machining
  • design of experiments
  • composite 3D printing
  • thermoset polymers
  • thermoplastic polymers
  • testing
  • properties
  • applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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27 pages, 33153 KiB  
Article
Machine Learning Models in Drilling of Different Types of Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites
by Katarzyna Biruk-Urban, Paul Bere and Jerzy Józwik
Polymers 2023, 15(23), 4609; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15234609 - 3 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The aim of the research presented in this paper was to simulate the relationship between selected technological drilling parameters (cutting speed, vc, and feed per tooth, fz) and cutting forces and the delamination in machining of a new glass-fiber-reinforced [...] Read more.
The aim of the research presented in this paper was to simulate the relationship between selected technological drilling parameters (cutting speed, vc, and feed per tooth, fz) and cutting forces and the delamination in machining of a new glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite. Four different types of new materials were manufactured with the use of a specially designed pressing device and differed in the fiber type (plain and twill woven materials) and weight fraction (wf) ratio, but they had the same number of layers and the same stacking sequence. A vertical machining center Avia VMC800HS was used for drilling holes with a two-edge carbide diamond coated drill. Measurements of the cutting force Fz in the drilling process conducted with variable technological parameters were carried out on a special test stand, 9257B, from Kistler. The new ink penetration method, involving covering the drilled hole surface with a colored liquid that spreads over the inner surface of the hole showing damage, was used to determine the delamination area. The cause-and-effect relationship between the drilling parameters was simulated with the use of five machine learning (ML) regression models (Linear Regression; Decision Tree Regressor; Decision Tree Regressor with Ada Boost; XGBRF Regressor; Gradient Boosting Regressor). Gradient Boosting Regressor results showed that the feed per tooth had the greatest impact on delamination—the higher the feed was, the greater the delamination became. Push-out delamination factors had higher values for materials that were made of plain woven fibers. The lowest amplitude of the cutting force component Fz was obtained for the lowest tested feed per tooth of 0.04 mm for all tested materials, with the lowest values obtained for the materials with twill fibers. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 3418 KiB  
Review
Characteristics of Carbon and Kevlar Fibres, Their Composites and Structural Applications in Civil Engineering—A Review
by Ștefania Ursache, Camelia Cerbu and Anton Hadăr
Polymers 2024, 16(1), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16010127 - 30 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2774
Abstract
Kevlar and carbon fibres and fabrics have won a leading place in the structure market, although such materials are not cheap, and are increasingly used for reinforcing and strengthening structural elements in the civil engineering, automotive, aerospace and military industries, due to their [...] Read more.
Kevlar and carbon fibres and fabrics have won a leading place in the structure market, although such materials are not cheap, and are increasingly used for reinforcing and strengthening structural elements in the civil engineering, automotive, aerospace and military industries, due to their superior mechanical properties, especially in terms of strength. The mechanical characteristics of such composite materials must be known in order to numerically simulate the mechanical behaviour of such structures in terms of the distribution of stresses and strains. It has also become a necessity to understand the effects of reinforcement with both types of fibres (carbon fibres and Kevlar fibres) on the mechanical properties, especially on the impact properties of such composites. This review aims to expose the main advantages and disadvantages of the hybridization of carbon and Kevlar fibres. For this reason, an overview is presented concerning the main characteristics (tensile strength, flexural strength, impact strength, coefficient of thermal expansion and so on) for carbon and Kevlar fibres and also for hybrid Kevlar–carbon composite materials to aid in the design of such hybrid composite materials. Finally, some civil construction rehabilitation and consolidation applications of the composites reinforced with carbon fibre, Kevlar fibre or with hybrid Kevlar–carbon fabrics are highlighted in the last part of the paper. Full article
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