Shape Memory Polymer Materials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart and Functional Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 5152

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Marine Resource Utilization in South China Sea, Collaborative Innovation Center of Marine Science and Technology, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China
Interests: shape memory polymer composites; 4D printing; smart structures; covalent organic frameworks; COMSOL simulation
School of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209, China
Interests: shape memory polymers; self-healing polymers; multifunctional supramolecular polymers; environment adaptability of polymers materials

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Guest Editor
Center for Composite Materials and Structures, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080, China
Interests: shape memory polymer composite; deployable structure; metamaterials; solid mechanics; finite element modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The collaborative design of material, structure, and function has attracted increasing attention worldwide. Shape memory polymer materials and 4D printing offer a way to enable such collaborative design, and they have been used for self-adaptive devices, reversible shape changing components, and smart structures.

In recent years, 4D printing based on shape memory materials has been extensively investigated for the increased need for intelligent additive manufacturing. Furthermore, the developed finite element modeling and COMSOL simulation of shape memory polymer materials and 4D printing structures are expected to be instrumental in optimizing and simplifying their design. For example, shape memory large deformation structures of hinges, antennas, stents and other deformable structures can be applied in the fields of aerospace, biological medicine, robotics, and flexible electronics. In addition, shape memory polymer composites and metamaterials also provide new opportunities to realize applications of multifunctional smart structures in more fields such as marine resource utilization, energy, and photocatalysis.

In this Special Issue, we call for academic publications on scientific advancements in the area of the shape memory polymer materials. Topics may include, but are not limited to, shape memory polymers and composites, multifunctional shape memory polymers with self-healing, self-sensing, and/or other behaviours, 4D printing smart structures and devices, finite element simulation of self-adaptive devices and reversible shape changing components. Both original research manuscripts and reviews are accepted.

Dr. Wenxin Wang
Dr. Fang Xie
Dr. Fengfeng Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • shape memory polymers
  • 4D printing
  • smart structures
  • self-adaptive devices
  • finite element modelling
  • COMSOL simulation
  • macromolecules
  • self-healing polymers
  • metamaterials
  • solid mechanics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2184 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Multiple Shape Memory Behaviors, Thermal and Physical Properties of Benzoxazine Blended with Diamino Polysiloxane
by Sunan Tiptipakorn, Chanikan Angkanawarangkana, Sarawut Rimdusit, Kasinee Hemvichian and Pattra Lertsarawut
Polymers 2023, 15(18), 3814; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15183814 - 18 Sep 2023
Viewed by 887
Abstract
In this research, benzoxazine (BA-a) and diamino polysiloxane (PSX750) blends were prepared at 0–50 wt% of BA-a. The interactions between two polymeric components were investigated via a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). The thermal properties of the blends were also determined with Dynamic [...] Read more.
In this research, benzoxazine (BA-a) and diamino polysiloxane (PSX750) blends were prepared at 0–50 wt% of BA-a. The interactions between two polymeric components were investigated via a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). The thermal properties of the blends were also determined with Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The mechanical properties and shape memory behaviors of the blends were also investigated. The FTIR spectra exhibited the shift of the peak from 1672 to the range of 1634–1637 cm−1, which could be identified as hydrogen bonds between two polymeric domains at the contents from 30 to 50 wt%. The DMA thermograms revealed two glass transition temperatures, which could indicate a partially miscible system. The char yield values were increased, while the decomposition temperatures were decreased with an increasing benzoxazine content. Interestingly, the blends at the contents of 10 and 20 wt% presented dual-shape memory behaviors, whereas triple- or multiple-shape memory behaviors were observed with benzoxazine contents of 30 to 50 wt%. For the high-temperature recovery state, a shape memory ratio of 97.5% with a recovery time of 65 s and a shape fixity ratio of 66.7% was recorded at the content of 50 wt%. For the low-temperature recovery state, a shape recovery ratio of 98.9% was observed at the same content. Moreover, the values of the recovery ratio for four shape-recovery cycles revealed multiple shape memory behaviors with high recovery ratios in the range of 95–98%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shape Memory Polymer Materials)
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14 pages, 9196 KiB  
Article
Design of Superhydrophobic Shape Memory Composites with Kirigami Structures and Uniform Wetting Property
by Zhe Zhao, Xinlin Li, Dongsong Wei, Jian Sun and Jinsong Leng
Polymers 2023, 15(18), 3738; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15183738 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1133
Abstract
With the continuous increase in human demand to improve aircraft performance, intelligent aircraft technologies have become a popular research field in recent years. Among them, the deformable skin structure has become one of the key technologies to achieve excellent and reliable performance. However, [...] Read more.
With the continuous increase in human demand to improve aircraft performance, intelligent aircraft technologies have become a popular research field in recent years. Among them, the deformable skin structure has become one of the key technologies to achieve excellent and reliable performance. However, during the service, deformable skin structures may encounter problems such as surface impact and adhesion of droplets in rainy weather or surface icing in low-temperature environments, which can seriously affect the flight safety of the aircraft. One way to overcome these issues is to use superhydrophobic shape memory materials in the structure. In this regard, first, shape memory composites were prepared with shape memory epoxy resin as the matrix and carbon fiber orthogonal woven fabric as the reinforcement material. Superhydrophobic shape memory composites (SSMCs) were then obtained by casting the kirigami composite with superhydrophobic carbon nanotube–polydimethylsiloxane (CNT@PDMS) mixture, and the surface was processed by laser micromachining. Shape memory performance and surface wetting performance were determined by material testing methods. The results showed that the shape memory recovery rate can reach 85.11%, the surface is superhydrophobic, the average water contact angle is 156.9 ± 4.4°, and the average rolling angle is 3 ± 0.5°. The three-point bending test of the specimens with different kirigami cell configurations showed that the shape memory composite based on the rectangular structure has the best deformability with an aspect ratio of 0.4. From the droplet impact test, it was found that the impact speed of water droplets and the curvature of the surface can greatly affect the dynamic performance of water. This work is expected to be of significant research value and importance for developing functional deformable skin materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shape Memory Polymer Materials)
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18 pages, 7825 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Characterization of Body-Temperature-Responsive Thermoset Shape Memory Polyurethane for Medical Applications
by Xiaoqing Yang, Zhipeng Han, Chengqi Jia, Tianjiao Wang, Xiaomeng Wang, Fanqi Hu, Hui Zhang, Jun Zhao and Xuesong Zhang
Polymers 2023, 15(15), 3193; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15153193 - 27 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1278
Abstract
Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are currently one of the most attractive smart materials expected to replace traditional shape memory alloys and ceramics (SMAs and SMCs, respectively) in some fields because of their unique properties of high deformability, low density, easy processing, and low [...] Read more.
Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are currently one of the most attractive smart materials expected to replace traditional shape memory alloys and ceramics (SMAs and SMCs, respectively) in some fields because of their unique properties of high deformability, low density, easy processing, and low cost. As one of the most popular SMPs, shape memory polyurethane (SMPU) has received extensive attention in the fields of biomedicine and smart textiles due to its biocompatibility and adjustable thermal transition temperature. However, its laborious synthesis, limitation to thermal response, poor conductivity, and low modulus limit its wider application. In this work, biocompatible poly(ε-caprolactone) diol (PCL-2OH) is used as the soft segment, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) is used as the hard segment, and glycerol (GL) is used as the crosslinking agent to prepare thermoset SMPU with a thermal transition temperature close to body temperature for convenient medical applications. The effects of different soft-chain molecular weights and crosslinking densities on the SMPU’s properties are studied. It is determined that the SMPU has the best comprehensive performance when the molar ratio of IPDI:PCL-2OH:GL is 2:1.5:0.33, which can trigger shape memory recovery at body temperature and maintain 450% recoverable strain. Such materials are excellent candidates for medical devices and can make great contributions to human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shape Memory Polymer Materials)
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12 pages, 3599 KiB  
Article
Effects of Accelerated Aging on Thermal, Mechanical and Shape Memory Properties of Cyanate-Based Shape Memory Polymer: III Vacuum Thermal Cycling
by Zhongxin Ping, Fang Xie, Xiaobo Gong, Liwu Liu, Jinsong Leng and Yanju Liu
Polymers 2023, 15(8), 1893; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15081893 - 14 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1358
Abstract
Shape memory polymers (SMPs) with intelligent deformability have shown great potential in the field of aerospace, and the research on their adaptability to space environments has far-reaching significance. Chemically cross-linked cyanate-based SMPs (SMCR) with excellent resistance to vacuum thermal cycling were obtained by [...] Read more.
Shape memory polymers (SMPs) with intelligent deformability have shown great potential in the field of aerospace, and the research on their adaptability to space environments has far-reaching significance. Chemically cross-linked cyanate-based SMPs (SMCR) with excellent resistance to vacuum thermal cycling were obtained by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) with linear polymer chains to the cyanate cross-linked network. The low reactivity of PEG overcame the shortcomings of high brittleness and poor deformability while endowing cyanate resin with excellent shape memory properties. The SMCR with a glass transition temperature of 205.8 °C exhibited good stability after vacuum thermal cycling. The SMCR maintained a stable morphology and chemical composition after repeated high–low temperature cycle treatments. The SMCR matrix was purified by vacuum thermal cycling, which resulted in an increase in its initial thermal decomposition temperature by 10–17 °C. The continuous vacuum high and low temperature relaxation of the vacuum thermal cycling increased the cross-linking degree of the SMCR, which improved the mechanical properties and thermodynamic properties of SMCR: the tensile strength of SMCR was increased by about 14.5%, the average elastic modulus was greater than 1.83 GPa, and the glass transition temperature increased by 5–10 °C. Furthermore, the shape memory properties of SMCR after vacuum thermal cycling treatment were well maintained due to the stable triazine ring formed by the cross-linking of cyanate resin. This revealed that our developed SMCR had good resistance to vacuum thermal cycling and thus may be a good candidate for aerospace engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shape Memory Polymer Materials)
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