Special Issue "Plasma Medicine"

A special issue of Plasma (ISSN 2571-6182).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mounir Laroussi
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA
Interests: plasma science; biomedical applications of plasmas; gaseous electronics; EM waves interactions with plasmas; plasma processing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Michael Keidar
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
Interests: plasma medicine; micropropulsion for micro and nanosatellites; plasma nanoscience and nanotechnology
Prof. Dr. Masaru Hori
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic and Electric Engineering, Nagoya University, Japan
Interests: plasma processing; nano technology; electronic and electric materials engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasma medicine is a multidisciplinary field of research that focuses on studies on the interaction of low-temperature plasmas with biological cells and tissues. Many advances took place in the last decade that promise to make cold plasma technology a basis for new medical therapies. However, many of the mechanisms whereby plasma affects cells and tissues are still not well understood. For this Special Issue of the journal Plasma, reseachers active in all aspects of the field of plasma medicine are invited to submit their latest results. Papers covering fundamental studies as well as papers discussing applications are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Mounir Laroussi
Prof. Dr. Michael Keidar
Prof. Dr. Masaru Hori
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plasma is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Low temperature plasma
  • Cells
  • Tissues
  • Medicine
  • Reactive species
  • Plasma medicine

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Special Issue on Plasma Medicine
Plasma 2018, 1(2), 259-260; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1020022 - 17 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment Modulates Human Monocytes/Macrophages Responsiveness
Plasma 2018, 1(2), 261-276; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1020023 - 29 Oct 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Monocytes are involved in innate immune surveillance, establishment and resolution on inflammation, and can polarize versus M1 (pro-inflammatory) or M2 (anti-inflammatory) macrophages. The possibility to control and drive immune cells activity through plasma stimulation is therefore attractive. We focused on the effects induced [...] Read more.
Monocytes are involved in innate immune surveillance, establishment and resolution on inflammation, and can polarize versus M1 (pro-inflammatory) or M2 (anti-inflammatory) macrophages. The possibility to control and drive immune cells activity through plasma stimulation is therefore attractive. We focused on the effects induced by cold-atmospheric plasma on human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Monocytes resulted more susceptible than monocyte-derived macrophages to the plasma treatment as demonstrated by the increase in reactive oxygen (ROS) production and reduction of viability. Macrophages instead were not induced to produce ROS and presented a stable viability. Analysis of macrophage markers demonstrated a time-dependent decrease of the M1 population and a correspondent increase of M2 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). These findings suggest that plasma treatment may drive macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Treatment of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells with the Canady Cold Plasma Conversion System: Preliminary Results
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 218-228; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010019 - 15 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Triple-negative breast cancer is a phenotype of breast cancer where the expression level of estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptors are low or absent. It is more frequently diagnosed in younger and premenopausal women, among which African and [...] Read more.
Triple-negative breast cancer is a phenotype of breast cancer where the expression level of estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptors are low or absent. It is more frequently diagnosed in younger and premenopausal women, among which African and Hispanic have a higher rate. Cold atmospheric plasma has revealed its promising ant-cancer capacity over the past two decades. In this study, we report the first cold plasma jet delivered by the Canady Cold Plasma Conversion Unit and characterization of its electric and thermal parameters. The unit effectively reduced the viability of triple-negative breast cancer up to 80% without thermal damage, providing a starting point for future clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Plasma Treatment of Ovarian Cancer Cells Mitigates Their Immuno-Modulatory Products Active on THP-1 Monocytes
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 201-217; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010018 - 15 Sep 2018
Cited by 8
Abstract
Cancers modulate their microenvironment to favor their growth. In particular, monocytes and macrophages are targeted by immuno-modulatory molecules installed by adjacent tumor cells such as ovarian carcinomas. Cold physical plasma has recently gained attention as innovative tumor therapy. We confirmed this for the [...] Read more.
Cancers modulate their microenvironment to favor their growth. In particular, monocytes and macrophages are targeted by immuno-modulatory molecules installed by adjacent tumor cells such as ovarian carcinomas. Cold physical plasma has recently gained attention as innovative tumor therapy. We confirmed this for the OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines in a caspase 3/7 independent and dependent manner, respectively. To elaborate whether plasma exposure interferes with their immunomodulatory properties, supernatants of control and plasma-treated tumor cells were added to human THP-1 monocyte cultures. In the latter, modest effects on intracellular oxidation or short-term metabolic activity were observed. By contrast, supernatants of plasma-treated cancer cells abrogated significant changes in morphological and phenotypic features of THP-1 cells compared to those cultured with supernatants of non-treated tumor cell counterparts. This included cell motility and morphology, and modulated expression patterns of nine cell surface markers known to be involved in monocyte activation. This was particularly pronounced in SKOV-3 cells. Further analysis of tumor cell supernatants indicated roles of small particles and interleukin 8 and 18, with MCP1 presumably driving activation in monocytes. Altogether, our results suggest plasma treatment to alleviate immunomodulatory secretory products of ovarian cancer cells is important for driving a distinct myeloid cell phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
A New Cold Plasma Jet: Performance Evaluation of Cold Plasma, Hybrid Plasma and Argon Plasma Coagulation
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 189-200; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010017 - 11 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
The use of plasma energy has expanded in surgery and medicine. Tumor resection in surgery and endoscopy has incorporated the use of a plasma scalpel or catheter for over four decades. A new plasma energy has expanded the tools in surgery: Cold Atmospheric [...] Read more.
The use of plasma energy has expanded in surgery and medicine. Tumor resection in surgery and endoscopy has incorporated the use of a plasma scalpel or catheter for over four decades. A new plasma energy has expanded the tools in surgery: Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP). A cold plasma generator and handpiece are required to deliver the CAP energy. The authors evaluated a new Cold Plasma Jet System. The Cold Plasma Jet System consists of a USMI Cold Plasma Conversion Unit, Canady Helios Cold Plasma® Scalpel, and the Canady Plasma® Scalpel in Hybrid and Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) modes. This plasma surgical system is designed to remove the target tumor with minimal blood loss and subsequently spray the local area with cold plasma. In this study, various operational parameters of the Canady Plasma® Scalpels were tested on ex vivo normal porcine liver tissue. These conditions included various gas flow rates (1.0, 3.0, 5.0 L/min), powers (20, 40, 60 P), and treatment durations (30, 60, 90, 120 s) with argon and helium gases. Plasma length, tissue temperature changes, and depth and eschar injury magnitude measurements resulting from treatment were taken into consideration in the comparison of the scalpels. The authors report that a new cold plasma jet technology does not produce any thermal damage to normal tissue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
The Canady Helios Cold Plasma Scalpel Significantly Decreases Viability in Malignant Solid Tumor Cells in a Dose-Dependent Manner
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 177-188; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010016 - 07 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
To determine appropriate treatment doses of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), the Canady Helios Cold Plasma Scalpel was tested across numerous cancer cell types including renal adenocarcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinoma, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Various CAP doses were tested consisting of both [...] Read more.
To determine appropriate treatment doses of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), the Canady Helios Cold Plasma Scalpel was tested across numerous cancer cell types including renal adenocarcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinoma, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Various CAP doses were tested consisting of both high (3 L/min) and low (1 L/min) helium flow rates, several power settings, and a range of treatment times up to 5 min. The impact of cold plasma on the reduction of viability was consistently dose-dependent; however, the anti-cancer capability varied significantly between cell lines. While the lowest effective dose varied from cell line to cell line, in each case an 80–99% reduction in viability was achievable 48 h after CAP treatment. Therefore, it is critical to select the appropriate CAP dose necessary for treating a specific cancer cell type. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Possible Mechanism of Glucose Uptake Enhanced by Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Atomic Scale Simulations
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 119-125; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010011 - 08 Jun 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has shown its potential in biomedical applications, such as wound healing, cancer treatment and bacterial disinfection. Recent experiments have provided evidence that CAP can also enhance the intracellular uptake of glucose molecules which is important in diabetes therapy. In [...] Read more.
Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has shown its potential in biomedical applications, such as wound healing, cancer treatment and bacterial disinfection. Recent experiments have provided evidence that CAP can also enhance the intracellular uptake of glucose molecules which is important in diabetes therapy. In this respect, it is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of intracellular glucose uptake induced by CAP, which is still unclear. Hence, in this study we try to elucidate the possible mechanism of glucose uptake by cells by performing computer simulations. Specifically, we study the transport of glucose molecules through native and oxidized membranes. Our simulation results show that the free energy barrier for the permeation of glucose molecules across the membrane decreases upon increasing the degree of oxidized lipids in the membrane. This indicates that the glucose permeation rate into cells increases when the CAP oxidation level in the cell membrane is increased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
New Hopes for Plasma-Based Cancer Treatment
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 150-155; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010014 - 18 Aug 2018
Cited by 11
Abstract
Non-thermal plasma represents a novel approach in cancer treatment. Both direct and indirect plasma treatments are available, with clinical trials of direct plasma treatment in progress. Indirect treatments involve chemotherapy (i.e., plasma-activated medium) and immunotherapy. Recent studies suggest that integrated plasma treatments could [...] Read more.
Non-thermal plasma represents a novel approach in cancer treatment. Both direct and indirect plasma treatments are available, with clinical trials of direct plasma treatment in progress. Indirect treatments involve chemotherapy (i.e., plasma-activated medium) and immunotherapy. Recent studies suggest that integrated plasma treatments could be an extremely effective approach to cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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Open AccessReview
Plasma Medicine: A Brief Introduction
Plasma 2018, 1(1), 47-60; https://doi.org/10.3390/plasma1010005 - 19 Feb 2018
Cited by 31
Abstract
This mini review is to introduce the readers of Plasma to the field of plasma medicine. This is a multidisciplinary field of research at the intersection of physics, engineering, biology and medicine. Plasma medicine is only about two decades old, but the research [...] Read more.
This mini review is to introduce the readers of Plasma to the field of plasma medicine. This is a multidisciplinary field of research at the intersection of physics, engineering, biology and medicine. Plasma medicine is only about two decades old, but the research community active in this emerging field has grown tremendously in the last few years. Today, research is being conducted on a number of applications including wound healing and cancer treatment. Although a lot of knowledge has been created and our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that play important roles in the interaction between low temperature plasma and biological cells and tissues has greatly expanded, much remains to be done to get a thorough and detailed picture of all the physical and biochemical processes that enter into play. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine)
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